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The Sensualist - The New Yorker
"Seducing another man’s wife could be forgiven; a bad poem, clumsy handwriting, or the wrong perfume could not."

"In Chapter 4, titled 'Yugao,' Genji comes across a run-down house, the abode of a young woman he is about to seduce.

Waley describes the entrance like this: 'There was a wattled fence over which some ivy-like creeper spread its cool green leaves, and among the leaves were white flowers with petals half-unfolded like the lips of people smiling at their own thoughts.'

Seidensticker: 'A pleasantly green vine was climbing a board wall. The white flowers, he thought, had a rather self-satisfied look about them.'

Tyler: 'A bright green vine, its white flowers smiling to themselves, was clambering merrily over what looked like a board fence.'

Washburn: 'A pleasant-looking green vine was creeping luxuriantly up a horizontal trellis, which resembled a board fence. White flowers were blooming on the vine, looking extremely self-satisfied and apparently without a care in the world.'”
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march 2016 by cluebucket

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