asteroza + calcium   12

Bacterially Produced, Nacre‐Inspired Composite Materials - Spiesz - - Small - Wiley Online Library
Using bacteria to lay down synthetic nacre layers, in a bottom up manufacturing approach. Surprisingly stiff and bendable.
artificial  synthetic  nacre  calcium  carbonate  composite  biomimicry  biomanufacturing  bacteria  secretion  biology  materials  science  research  technology 
april 2019 by asteroza
Could the humble sea urchin hold the key to carbon capture? - Press Office - Newcastle University
So they obviously patented this but, if they plan on bubbling flue gases through a water column (which has a big energy cost due to increased back pressure on the power production system), one problem is sourcing the dissolved calcium for the water column, and the other is the catalyst recover. Nickel nanoparticles seem to be recoverable via magnetic separation, but during the calcium carbonate production process, wouldn't the catalysts get trapped in the carbonate itself, requiring you to ball mill grind the carbonate outputs of the system to recover the catalyst? The other problem is getting that calcium into the water column itself. Easy way would be relatively clean seawater, and keep cycling in fresh seawater into the column as the calcium gets depleted. But inland, you won't have a convenient body of water with usable calcium content. So how would you go about seeding the column then?
water  calcium  carbonate  nanoparticle  carbon  column  capture  nickel  mineralization  CO2  CCS  Delicious 
february 2013 by asteroza
Nickel nanoparticles catalyse reversible hydration of carbon dioxide for mineralization carbon capture and storage - Catalysis Science & Technology (RSC Publishing)
Interesting research related to carbon capture. Scientists set out to better understand carbonic acid creation, and needed a catalyst for speeding up experiments. Chance discovery of high surface area nickel on Sea Urchin exoskeletons led to the discovery that nickel nanoparticles catalyze the formation of calcium carbonate from dissolved CO2 and calcium in water, mimicking a carbonic anhydrase enzyme but without the pH limitations . It appears the process leads to direct calcium carbonate, without much carbonic acid byproducts. It may be possible to do this via a seawater column bubbling flue gas with suspended nickel nanoparticles, since the nickel particles can be separated magnetically (though wouldn't that require grinding the recovered carbonate?)
calcium  water  technology  CO2  research  science  carbonate  materials  nanoparticle  carbon  capture  nickel  column  mineralization  CCS  catalyst  nanotechnology  Delicious 
february 2013 by asteroza
0314.pdf (application/pdf Object)
I wonder how graphite flouride batteries compare to the molten liquid electrode battery research?
graphite  calcium  flouride  battery  energy  storage  high  temperature  materials  science  research  filetype:pdf  media:document  Delicious 
february 2010 by asteroza

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