asterisk2a + changes   6

Limbic Revision: How Love Rewires the Brain | Brain Pickings
In a relationship, one mind revises the other; one heart changes its partner. This astounding legacy of our combined status as mammals and neural beings is limbic revision: the power to remodel the emotional parts of the people we love, as our Attractors [coteries of ingrained information patterns] activate certain limbic pathways, and the brain’s inexorable memory mechanism reinforces them. Who we are and who we become depends, in part, on whom we love. [...] Real, honest, complete love requires letting go.
relationship  lifelessons  partnerships  environment  partners  book  social  science  lifelesson  relationships  social  study  personality  changes 
october 2013 by asterisk2a
You Can't See It, But You'll Be A Different Person In 10 Years : Shots - Health News : NPR
[A]ccording to fresh research that suggests that people generally fail to appreciate how much their personality and values will change in the years ahead — even though they recognize that they have changed in the past.

"The problem with that is, it takes 10 years,"

[...] "Life is a process of growing and changing, and what our results suggest is that growth and change really never stops," says Gilbert, "despite the fact that at every age from 18 to 68, we think it's pretty much come to a close."

Personality changes do take place faster when people are younger, says Gilbert, so "a person who says I've changed more in the past decade than I expect to change in the future is not wrong."
science  people  change  outlook  future  lifelesson  life  lesson  lifehacks  lifehacker  personality  changes  teens  adulthood  growing  up  psychology  change  aging  culture  society  values  value  personality 
january 2013 by asterisk2a
US consumer spending: Hard times | The Economist
AMERICANS are spending less on clothes and eating out and more on household fuel bills and healthcare, according to data from the Bureau of Labour Statistics. Between 2007 and 2010, average annual consumer spending per unit—defined as a family/shared household or single/financially independent person—fell by 3.1% to $48,109. Average prices over this period have risen by 5.2%, so real consumer spending has fallen by almost 8%.
change  changes  consumption  consumer  USA  statistics  greatrecession  2007  2010  deleveraging 
october 2011 by asterisk2a

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