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Budget 2017: Hammond to tell us the Brexit vote could have been worse | Business | The Guardian
consumers carried on spending and businesses continued to expand.

The picture for the public finances is also looking rosier compared with Hammond’s maiden autumn statement in November. [...] But here’s what the chancellor will not tell you: living costs have gone up and will continue to do so. The poorest will be hit hardest as the cost of essentials such as food and heating take a growing chunk out of already tight family budgets. Wages will struggle to match rises in inflation and the government’s benefit cuts mean that incomes will fall for the poorest people in Britain. In short, unless the government does something significant to improve living standards this week, inequality will start rising again.
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march 2017 by asterisk2a
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