allaboutgeorge + search   24

The Poetry of Headlines - Lingua Franca - The Chronicle of Higher Education
Newspaper headlines, as I said last week, are prose poetry. Not only do they have distinctive grammar and diction, they also have a tightly constrained form and even more tightly constrained content. Compared with a headline, a sonnet is a piece of cake.
newspapers  media  poetry  writing  creativity  search  editing  design 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Daytona crash video tests fair use, copyright for fans and journalists | Poynter.
Here is the kicker when it comes to the NASCAR/YouTube example: The U.S. Copyright Office says, “Copyright protects the particular way authors have expressed themselves. It does not extend to any ideas, systems, or factual information conveyed in a work.”
copyright  media  journalism  youtube  google  search  sports 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
An inside look at Google's news-ranking algorithm
Google itself has offered minimal insight about the algorithms it uses to discover and rank news stories. All the company will say publicly is that articles are selected and ranked based on metrics such as how often and on what sites a story appears; freshness of content; location; relevance; and diversity. The company has claimed that it constantly fine-tunes its news ranking to ensure high quality content is shown.
twitter  facebook  google  news  journalism  media  search  data 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Google’s Richard Gingras: 8 questions that will help define the future of journalism » Nieman Journalism Lab
While technology holds great promise, it’s important to recognize that while technology has value it has no “values.” Technology, in and of itself, is not the solution. Yes, it can provide the means for solutions, but it is up to us to determine how to make it so.

We need to rethink every facet of the journalism model in light of the dramatic changes in the architecture of the news ecosystem. I’m not suggesting that everything must change, but a comprehensive rethinking is a necessary and valuable intellectual process.
journalism  media  newspapers  news  google  content  narrative  writing  reporting  work  data  search  social  design  innovation 
april 2012 by allaboutgeorge
I Flunked My Social Media Background Check. Will You?
Your personal email address, especially if you've had it for a long time, could have all kinds of things tied to it that you'd rather an employer not see. Spend the nothing it costs to set up a dedicated job search email account, and list that one on your c.v.
business  jobs  work  web  online  social  socialnetworking  facebook  twitter  search  google 
july 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Evan Williams | evhead: Five Reasons Domains Are Getting Less Important
While a good .com name is still worth a lot, it's not as crucial to success on the internet as it used to be. And the forces that have made it less important will continue to make it less important over time (especially the mobile-related ones). I'd still opt (and pay up) for a nice, clean .com if I could get one, but I wouldn't consider it a must have.
names  technology  business  reputation  memory  search  web 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Shrinking of the Non-Social Web - Ben Elowitz - Voices - AllThingsD
When you exclude just Facebook from the rest of the Web, consumption in terms of minutes of use shrank by nearly nine percent between March 2010 and March 2011, according to data from comScore. And, even when you include Facebook usage, total non-mobile Internet consumption still dropped three percent over the same period.

We’ve known that social is growing lightning fast — notably, Facebook consumption, which grew by 69 percent — but now it’s clear that Facebook is not growing in addition to the Web. Rather, it’s actually taking consumption away from the publishers who compete on the rest of the Web.

And just what is the rest of the Web?

I have been calling it the “document Web,” based on how Google and other Web architectures view its pages as documents, linked together. But increasingly, it might as well be called the “searchable Web” since it’s accessed predominantly as a reference, and navigated primarily via search.
data  information  search  web  technology  facebook  social  business  attention  blogging  twitter 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
PBS plays Google’s word game, transcribing thousands of hours of video into crawler-friendly text » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
PBS’ radio cousin, NPR, still relies on humans for transcription, paying a third-party service to capture 51 hours of audio a week. In-house editors do a final sweep to ensure accuracy of proper names and unusual words. It’s expensive, though NPR does not disclose how much, and time-consuming, with a turnaround time of four to six hours.

“We continue to keep an eye on automated solutions, which have gradually improved over time, but are not of sufficiently high quality yet to be suitable for licensing and other public distribution,” said Kinsey Wilson, NPR’s head of digital media.
radio  npr  google  search  context  video  language 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Can Delicious Solve Our Information Discovery Problem?: Tech News and Analysis «
But think about the vast amount of content that has already been sucked in by Delicious over the years — arguably the single biggest asset that the company has, and the one Hurley and Chen were likely willing to pay up for. Those millions of shared bookmarks are a kind of social graph of content in a way: they are implicit signals from all the people who shared those links, or stored them for later, that there is valuable content there. Some of those links may be dead or changed, but it’s still a fairly substantial foundation for an information-discovery service to build on.
social  information  toread  yahoo  socialmedia  search  data  attention  youtube 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Augmented Reality Comes Closer to Reality - NYTimes.com
For consumers, the first application will be created by a movie studio that is working on an augmented reality game to accompany a new movie. It will be possible to hunt for hidden virtual reality objects in a city. However, by giving the underlying technology away Mr. Lynch is obviously hoping that he has an answer to the frequently asked question: “What comes after Google?”

There have already been dozens of companies who have tried to compete with Google’s search service, so far without success. However, there is also a broad consensus that the future of search will blend next generation search technologies with geographical location.
google  search  augmentedreality  mobile  technology  movies  location 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Google introduces search site blocking. Why not the reverse, too? | Knight Digital Media Center
“A tool like this could increase the Balkanization of a precious resource: attention. When you can choose your info-filter, you can filter out not just content farms, but ideological opponents, religious resources, and whoever’s content you’re boycotting this week or next."
information  attention  media  journalism  google  search  power  technology 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Richard J. Tofel: Someday, the sun will set on SEO — and the business of news will be better for it » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
[A]fter a decade of SEO, a lot of lowest common denominator is what we have.

But a focus on readers rather than advertisers as the heart of business model will, inevitably, create a more segmented dynamic, as the strongest appeals to readers tend to be in niches, and as, to venture an impolite reminder, some readers are a great deal more valuable than others. This is not only because some readers have more money to spend on content (as they do, admittedly, on the goods and services offered by advertisers), although that is true. But it is also, and ultimately more importantly true, that some readers are willing to spend more time, to develop greater loyalty to particular content, to value it more highly.

Improved search, and diminished SEO, should tend place a greater value on such readers, elevating content of higher value, higher quality and, therefore, higher cost.

That would matter a great deal.
search  google  media  online  technology  mobile  marketing  economics  attention  reading 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
AOL-HuffPo: Acquisition of means of production without being revolutionary at all | Capital New York
Search engines improve by delivering you more of the results that you were hoping for when you search for something; so it gets better when it relies on social networks than it does when it relies on algorithms. And this is where the future starts to look brighter for "original content" producers: This is a road that leads, ultimately, to the people who produce what they produce and get their readers without tricking them into reading. Which means Arianna Huffington will get better at her job, and your readers will get better at finding you, will stay longer when they get there, and, if you play your cards right, will start going straight to you instead of waiting for Arianna to tell them to. Then, maybe you can capture a sliver of the business she's going to be getting.

It's that sliver that is going to grow next. And as it does, the scale will even out, potentially putting Arianna herself, and places like AOL, on the defense once again.
aol  technology  search  google  social  news  media  journalism  business 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Holman W. Jenkins, Jr.: Google and the Search for the Future - WSJ.com
Let's say you're walking down the street. Because of the info Google has collected about you, "we know roughly who you are, roughly what you care about, roughly who your friends are." Google also knows, to within a foot, where you are. Mr. Schmidt leaves it to a listener to imagine the possibilities: If you need milk and there's a place nearby to get milk, Google will remind you to get milk. It will tell you a store ahead has a collection of horse-racing posters, that a 19th-century murder you've been reading about took place on the next block.

Says Mr. Schmidt, a generation of powerful handheld devices is just around the corner that will be adept at surprising you with information that you didn't know you wanted to know. "The thing that makes newspapers so fundamentally fascinating—that serendipity—can be calculated now. We can actually produce it electronically," Mr. Schmidt says.
android  google  location  mobile  privacy  search  seo  future  marketing 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The web isn't killing newspapers, advertisers are - CNN.com
The funny thing about Google is that it has tried to master almost every sort of business. It's investing in windmills, it's investing in mobile phones, it wants to lay cable for high speed internet connections, just to name a few. Yet, for all the businesses it has tried, there's one it says it has no interest in: print content like newspapers.

The reason? Making money on newspapers, and getting advertisers interested in spending again on print publications, has even the big brains at Google stumped.
journalism  media  newspapers  online  google  marketing  search 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Patch vs. MediaNews: One Little, Instructive Story | Newsonomics
The story quality is one thing; the ability to SEO and draw community comment may be another. That’s an emerging gulf worth paying attention to.
journalism  local  search  media  medianews  danville  newspapers  attention  patch  contracostatimes 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
A Conversation With Hunch Cofounder Caterina Fake
[...] But from our perspective, the social graph is actually less informative and actually gives you less valuable information on you than what we’re calling the taste graph because you may – I may be in contact with my co-workers, who are kind of like male engineer types and, with my mom, I have a very close relationship with. But our tastes are very different, the things that we like, the sushi restaurants or (unintelligible) that we’d be interested in…

Mr. ARRINGTON: Yeah.

Ms. FAKE: Or the clothes that we would wear and so, what we’re – our assumption is that there’s people out there who share similar taste. They have a similar aesthetic to you or they have, say, you’re kind of looking for a blog or a news show, your political position or political stance would inform that choice as well. So, that’s really what…

Mr. ARRINGTON: And this actually works?

Ms. FAKE: And this actually works, yes.
interviews  news  search  video  interview  internet  aesthetics  identity  attention  data 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
ABC News: AP: Don't Bet Newspapers Will Get Rich Shunning Google
"We are in no shape or form at odds with Google," said William Dean Singleton, chief executive of MediaNews Group Inc., a private company that owns more than 50 daily newspapers, including The Denver Post and San Jose Mercury News. "There is no question that Google provides us with a large audience for our content, which we monetize with ad revenue."

Singleton probably will block Google from showing more than mere snippets from two MediaNews newspapers, the York Daily Record in Pennsylvania and the Enterprise-Record in Chico, Calif., that plan to start charging to read some of their content early next year. The rest of MediaNews' newspapers will remain fully available to Google, according to Singleton, who is also the AP's chairman.
medianews  newspapers  journalism  media  business  attention  search 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Inquisitr: The hashtag jungle of real time search
Rather than having to deal with old news and the built up reaction to past events companies now have a chance to see these negative events, or even positive ones, as they are happening. By being able to deal with consumer reactions as they develop in real time companies are able in the short run to save money that they would have otherwise had to spend on things like lawyers, public relations, and crisis management.

In the long run it puts a human face to the companies who step in early due to their monitoring of social media and in turn presents the company to consumers as one who cares and is worth spending our money on.

This kind of use of real time search might only return savings or make millions for those involved which might not be as sexy as making billions but sometimes reputation is more important than short term dollars in the bank.
search  google  twitter  facebook  media  reputation  attention  information  data  business 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
How Twitter Will Change the Way We Live -- Printout -- TIME
At its heart, Google's system is built around the slow, anonymous accumulation of authority: pages rise to the top of Google's search results according to, in part, how many links point to them, which tends to favor older pages that have had time to build an audience. That's a fantastic solution for finding high-quality needles in the immense, spam-plagued haystack that is the contemporary Web. But it's not a particularly useful solution for finding out what people are saying right now, the in-the-moment conversation that industry pioneer John Battelle calls the "super fresh" Web. Even in its toddlerhood, Twitter is a more efficient supplier of the super-fresh Web than Google. If you're looking for interesting articles or sites devoted to Kobe Bryant, you search Google. If you're looking for interesting comments from your extended social network about the three-pointer Kobe just made 30 seconds ago, you go to Twitter.
twitter  online  attention  web  google  search 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge

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