allaboutgeorge + sciencefiction   27

'Blade Runner 2049': Why some science fiction writers are tired of dystopias - CSMonitor.com
“The utility dystopian fiction used to serve was to bring problems to our attention and seek solutions. But the danger is that these stories can become a collective act of despair in response to current events.”
story  fiction  movies  attention  aesthetics  sciencefiction  scifi 
5 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Seeing the Future in Science Fiction : The New Yorker
By 1964, when I was negotiating puberty in the chill deeps of the Cold War, history itself had become the Atomic Disintegrator. In those years, I was drawn to science fiction (and mainly to its prose forms) for the evidence it offered of manifold possibilities of otherness. To a curious, anxious, white male child coming of age in an incurious and paranoid white monoculture, there was literally nothing like it—though a great deal of science fiction, possibly the majority of it, I was starting to notice, depicted futuristic monocultures that were dominated by white males. The rest, however, had as much to do with making me the person I am today as anything else did. Things might be different, science fiction told me, and different in literally any way you could imagine, however radical.
sciencefiction  literature  newyorker  fiction  identity  1960s 
june 2012 by allaboutgeorge
The Spaces Between Stars: The secret connection between crime fiction and science fiction
Science fiction and crime fiction contextualised, explored and reported on rapidly changing and expanding modern conditions.  And they did it in ways that spoke to the felt experiences of our lives, to our hopes and our fears, in ways that other fictions, or even other reportage, couldn't approach.  Science fiction and crime fiction explained to us where we really are, and where we might be going.
fiction  writing  sciencefiction  crime  books 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Maximus Clarke talks with William Gibson about his “speculative novels of last Wednesday” : Maud Newton
The surprising thing about it — I almost said the insidious thing, but I’m trying to be anthropological — the surprising thing, to me, is that once we have our gramophone, or iPad, or locomotive, we become that which has the gramophone, the iPad, or the locomotive, and thereby, are instantly incapable of recognizing what just happened to us, as I believe we’re incapable of understanding what broadcast television, or the radio, or telephony did to us.
I strongly suspect that prior to those things we were something else. In that regard, our predecessors are in a sense unknowable. Imagine a world without recorded music: I always come to the conclusion that it’s impossible for me to imagine that, because I have become that which lives with recorded music.
music  writing  technology  futurism  aesthetics  attention  identity  television  ipad  transportation  sciencefiction  novels  fiction 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
io9: China Miéville explains theology, magic, and why JJ Abrams hates you
I don't have any fantastic insight, but I think it's simply that cities to varying degrees are amazing palimpsests of history and cultures. They're coagulated together, a mixing of social norms. I like the temporal dislocation of cities, where you get 17th century buildings next to 21st buildings in London. The world is divided between people who like fractured mixed up stuff, and those who like clean aesthetic totality. I'm more the former.

The majority of humanity now live in cities. They are the site of most political and financial drivers - that's just a fact of economy. They are the site of this kind of chaotic aggregation of ideas that's going to translate into a sensation of the fantastic. That's why fantastic city fiction is so strong – it's about translating enchantment into a modern urban environment.
cities  urban  geography  population  fiction  economy  writing  sciencefiction  history  architecture 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Music Is Science Fiction: An Interview With The Lisps | Lightspeed Magazine
Over the past two weeks, I’ve exchanged several e-mails with The Lisps. In the interview that follows, we touch on topics such as self-help songs, The Difference Engine, string theory, and, of course, The Singularity.
music  songwriting  sciencefiction  writing  creativity  art  indie  rock  literature  books  science 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
How Paul Krugman found politics : The New Yorker
Krugman explained that he’d become an economist because of science fiction. When he was a boy, he’d read Isaac Asimov’s “Foundation” trilogy and become obsessed with the central character, Hari Seldon. Seldon was a “psychohistorian”—a scientist with such a precise understanding of the mechanics of society that he could predict the course of events thousands of years into the future and save mankind from centuries of barbarism. He couldn’t predict individual behavior—that was too hard—but it didn’t matter, because history was determined not by individuals but by laws and hidden forces. “If you read other genres of fiction, you can learn about the way people are and the way society is,” Krugman said to the audience, “but you don’t get very much thinking about why are things the way they are, or what might make them different. What would happen if ?”
economics  politics  newyorker  interview  economy  writing  finance  sciencefiction  history 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Douglas Coupland: 'Generation A' loneliness
"Storytelling is ultimately a creative act of pattern recognition," Coupland says. "Through characters, plot and setting, a writer creates places where previously invisible truths become visible. Or the storyteller posits a series of dots that the reader can connect. In times of information upheaval like right now, the attempt to locate patterns is one of the few ways to survive and not be dragged into the churn."
story  books  fiction  sciencefiction  futurism  writing 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Cross Roads Blues - a novelette by Paul McAuley
he first time Turner heard Robert Johnson play was to a vast crowd in Washington, D.C., December 5th 1945, the night the desegregation bill went through, and just three weeks before Johnson was assassinated. The second time was on what was supposed to be a routine archive trip, June 3rd 1937, a jook joint just outside the little Mississippi town of Tallula, and it was something else.
sciencefiction  scifi  blues  music  fiction 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
io9 - Did Star Trek Change Your Life? - Star Trek
The fact is, stories are meant to be retold. You may like them less in the retelling, or you may suddenly like them more (hence the phenomenon of rebooted Battlestar Galactica). But nobody can take away the stories that changed your life. Those are always going to be yours, untouched, until the space worms nibble your ganglia. They will keep inspiring you, and keep being meaningful. Hopefully, new stories will come along that mean something to you later in life, or that spur you to action in a way you never expected.
story  sciencefiction  creativity  identity  writing  movies  film  cinema 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
SCIFI.COM / Tribute
Science fiction writers' responses to the September 11 attacks
september11  911  sciencefiction  essay  writing 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Wired Magazine: Novelist Neal Stephenson Once Again Proves He's the King of the Worlds
"I could never get that idea, the notion that society in general is becoming aliterate, out of my head. People who write books, people who work in universities, who work on big projects for a long time, are on a diverging course from the rest of society. Slowly, the two cultures just get further and further apart."
literature  libarry  writing  reading  books  fiction  culture  science  history  society  academia  education  philosophy  interview  sciencefiction  time  future 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
William Gibson Interview: William Gibson Talks to io9 About Canada, Draft Dodging, and Godzilla
"I believe people in the future will (sic) weild unimaginable tools of forensic transparency — and they'll aim them back at history. They'll find out about what every major player did all the way back with tools we can't imagine today. There will be no
scifi  sciencefiction  writing  history  blogging  privacy  security  canada  novels  books 
june 2008 by allaboutgeorge
cityofsound: The street as platform
"Freeze the frame, and scrub the film backwards and forwards a little, observing the physical activity on the street. But what can’t we see?"
academia  cities  computers  data  design  futurism  information  infrastructure  location  media  mobile  music  politics  presence  privacy  public  radio  research  scifi  social  sociology  society  software  story  technology  urban  web  wifi  writing  essay  film  sciencefiction 
april 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Nerve: Man vs. Machine
"Do you worry robots might be more attracted to other robots than to humans?" "That's just a matter of programming."
science  sciencefiction  research  love  relationships  sex  society 
january 2008 by allaboutgeorge
BLDGBLOG: Comparative Planetology: An Interview with Kim Stanley Robinson
"I’ve been working all my career to try to redefine utopia in more positive terms – in more dynamic terms."
toread  sciencefiction  archaeology  architecture  cities  environment  fiction  interview  interviews  literature  reading  science  writing 
december 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com Interviews - William Gibson
"If I knew what I was doing, I literally wouldn't be doing my job. That's what E. M. Forster said. He said if a novelist is in control of his or her characters, they're not even close to doing their job."
books  fiction  interview  interviews  sciencefiction  novels  writing  story 
august 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Space to think | By genre | Guardian Unlimited Books
"I had no way of knowing then that no book gets written by the guy who walks around thinking about writing books. [...] The book is what happens when your fingers are hitting the keyboard."
interview  books  sciencefiction  uk  writing  fiction  creativity  novels 
august 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Computer Crow's Nest: David Anthony Durham's "Acacia"
"My problem with being obligated to address the black experience is that my identity as an African American is only part of who I am."
race  sciencefiction  fantasy  writing  creativity  fiction  black  usa 
july 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Old interviews redefine "Star Wars" mythology | Entertainment | Entertainment News | Reuters.com
"Remember, science-fiction films do really great the first week, then they drop off to nothing. It's a good sign, but it doesn't mean anything. Let's wait a couple of weeks. [...] I don't want to count my chickens before they hatch."
sciencefiction  cinema  interview  interviews  1970s 
april 2007 by allaboutgeorge
WaPo: Doris Lessing Reflects on World, Change
"Quite a few people think it wouldn't take very much to return to a few warrior bands, with a few breeding women. Our society is dependent on some precarious mechanisms, and they are very dicey. They can easily collapse."
women  writing  novels  fiction  sciencefiction  religion  gender  society  power  feminism  identity 
october 2006 by allaboutgeorge
Salon.com Arts & Entertainment | Darkness becomes them
"[T]he networks have integrated sci-fi into the mainstream with shows that not only dig deeper into questions of community and the ways that communities react to outside threats, but also explore the responses of individuals to intense circumstances."
television  fiction  terrorism  media  story  sciencefiction  robots  community  society 
october 2006 by allaboutgeorge
Amardeep Singh: An Indian Speculative Fiction Writer: Vandana Singh
"[W]hat seems different (Indian?) in Vandana Singh's style is her juxtaposing of the ongoing reality of poverty in Indian life with the imaginative freedom of speculative metaphors from science."
india  asian  sciencefiction  poor  writing 
march 2005 by allaboutgeorge
Comparing Basque and the Dravidian Languages
I was looking for the meaning of the word "bikku" after watching a scene in Michael Winterbottom's "Code 46" and hearing it as a character's name
language  identity  india  cinema  sciencefiction  asian  religion 
january 2005 by allaboutgeorge

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