allaboutgeorge + marketing   393

TCCC Unity: A New Coke Classic - Print Magazine
The most important thing today for a brand is not the content that it talks about, but how it talks about it. The typeface becomes a critical part of that voice and DNA, with consistency, authenticity and believability becoming paramount requirements.
marketing  beverages  language  business  story  storytelling  reputation  authority 
january 2018 by allaboutgeorge
The True Story of "The Greatest Showman on Earth" | History | Smithsonian
“He had these new ways of making racism seem fun and for people to engage in activities that degraded a racially subjected person in ways that were intimate and funny and surprising and novel,” says Reiss. “That’s part of his legacy, that’s part of what he left us, just as he also left us some really great jokes and circus acts and this kind of charming, wise-cracking ‘America’s uncle’ reputation. This is equally a part of his legacy.”
race  entertainment  history  usa  marketing  capitalism  politics  movies  film 
december 2017 by allaboutgeorge
Monocle's View From Nowhere | New Republic
Capital, and with it cultural capital, floods to the place where it can most efficiently reproduce itself, places that Monocle takes pains to identify and share.
magazines  marketing  business  economics  style  fashion  globalization  publishing 
june 2017 by allaboutgeorge
Apple marketing executive Bozoma Saint John is joining Uber as its chief brand officer - Recode
I’m a change agent. I enjoy telling stories of brands at moments in time that [they] are going to change culture and I firmly believe that Uber is going to do that.”
labor  apple  corporations  marketing 
june 2017 by allaboutgeorge
A Dutch publisher talks about his new mobile app with subscriptions for individual writers — paidContent
“I’m quite certain we will lose money at the start, because everything you do in media tends to lose money at the start,” he said. “But I am optimistic that this could turn out to be a very significant business.”
reading  journalism  marketing  media  app  iphone  business  personal  subscription  publishing 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Dan Harmon and life after 'Community' - Grantland
The conversation we're not having is: "Hey, there's 250 million of us watching an average of six hours a day of a one-way transmission that only ever tells us that we are all animals and that we should buy Cottonell." That's the one conversation no one is having, not a single one of us. Well, I mean, there are a couple people having it; they're on street corners covered in tattoos with their dicks pierced, and they're holding signs saying, "Honk if you want to burn down the White House." Those people are not marketable; we put them in the same drawer as homeless people; they're weird characters, putting flyers on your windshield and walking around barefoot and freaking out about the fact that this Orwellian nightmare is happening, and we're all inside having these debates about whether or not liking 30 Rock makes us smart or stupid.
television  identity  marketing  advertising  business  narrative  reputation 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
The Sunday Conversation: Barry Manilow - latimes.com
So I was surprised to learn that you wrote the music for "Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there."

I wrote a lot of those in those days.

That's probably your biggest hit. Do you still get royalties on that?

I got $500. They buy you out. And in those days I was happy to get the $500.
songwriting  music  business  pop  marketing 
july 2011 by allaboutgeorge
How Can Jeans Cost $300? - WSJ.com
Jeans makers say that manufacturing in the U.S., in addition to appealing to consumers, allows them to move quickly. When Jeff Rudes, founder and chief executive of J Brand, saw designer Jil Sander's electric colors in New York's Jeffrey boutique earlier this year, he asked his designers to come up with a hot pink and an emerald green color for jeans. Five days later, the first, small run of jeans were shipping into Barneys New York. Mr. Rudes says it typically takes his company six to eight weeks to make a pair of jeans in the U.S., compared with three to six months in China.
business  marketing  fashion  mexico  china  usa 
july 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The ghettoisation of pink: how it has cornered the little-girl market | Society | The Observer
I wish I could tell you that I had reached my own goals: getting my daughter outside more, taking walks in the woods together, playing sports, making art. Occasionally I have – and I advocate all of that – but mostly I have just got a lot more canny about how we participate in the consumer culture. At bedtime we continue to read legends, mythology, and fairytales – all of which teem with complex female characters that fire a child's imagination. The path to womanhood is strewn with enchantment, but it is also rife with thickets and thorns and a Big Bad Culture that threatens to consume them even as they consume it. The good news is, the choices we make for our toddlers can influence how they navigate life as teens. I'm not saying we can, or will, do everything "right," only that there is power – magic – in awareness.
women  parenting  gender  sex  marketing  feminism  children 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Culture magazine provides powerful brand extension for newspaper
I believe the lesson learned is that brand extension is not only about capitalising on your brand, but also about using the new product to strengthen the mother brand. If the brand extension does not support or strengthen the mother brand in any way, you should probably not launch the product. The target should therefore always be both gaining commercial success and strengthening the mother brand and your market position.
norway  business  marketing  publishing  magazines  media 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Quick-response codes aim to capitalize on the boom in smartphones - WSJ.com
"QR codes are not the end-all, be-all," says Ryan Goff, vice president/director of social-media marketing at marketing firm MGH Inc. "They may not exist in two years. But they're a temporary solution to the problem of, 'How do you connect people to online things in the real world?' "
media  social  marketing  mobile  business  technology 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Richard J. Tofel: Someday, the sun will set on SEO — and the business of news will be better for it » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
[A]fter a decade of SEO, a lot of lowest common denominator is what we have.

But a focus on readers rather than advertisers as the heart of business model will, inevitably, create a more segmented dynamic, as the strongest appeals to readers tend to be in niches, and as, to venture an impolite reminder, some readers are a great deal more valuable than others. This is not only because some readers have more money to spend on content (as they do, admittedly, on the goods and services offered by advertisers), although that is true. But it is also, and ultimately more importantly true, that some readers are willing to spend more time, to develop greater loyalty to particular content, to value it more highly.

Improved search, and diminished SEO, should tend place a greater value on such readers, elevating content of higher value, higher quality and, therefore, higher cost.

That would matter a great deal.
search  google  media  online  technology  mobile  marketing  economics  attention  reading 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Microsoft: Consumers Should Think Twice Before Broadcasting Location | Ina Fried | Mobilized | AllThingsD
Microsoft’s research found that privacy concerns are a barrier for some to adopting location-based services, particularly in the U.S. About half of overall survey respondents said they would be more comfortable with such services if they had more information on just who was seeing the information being shared.

The company also found that while 94 percent of consumers find location-based services to be valuable, they weren’t terribly willing to pay, and those who were often weren’t willing to pay more than $10 for such services. That seems to indicate more promise for advertising-funded services, especially since nearly half of those who have seen a location-based mobile ad have taken action on the ad–vastly higher than the response rates seen on traditional online ads.
mobile  marketing  business  technology  social  location  privacy 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
No Opting Out Of Facebook Turning Your Check-Ins, Likes Into Ads | Epicenter | Wired.com
If you click the Facebook Like button on any given site, that data is transmitted to your own Facebook profile and can be promoted by marketers in ads to your friends.
facebook  privacy  marketing  business  technology  social 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
I’m the mayor! So what?
It’s not so much about where you are as it is about why you are there. Simply checking in at the grocery store might not supply anyone with useful information, but noting that the grocery store is playing your favorite band, or that there is an outrageous sale on delicious baked goods adds a layer to the check-in that can really excited people. It’s about sharing experiences, because other people can relate to experiences.

As for mayorships and badges – unless gaining rewards (which come around once in a while, but not frequently enough), these provide a very basic function, which is that of a simple reward. One might collect mayorships or badges similar to the way we collected things and played games when we were children. You never got any real reward from winning a game of Monopoly, but you had fun while playing, right?
marketing  business  mobile  technology  location  identity  privacy 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The $85 Smartphone and the imminent extinction of non-smartphones | asymco
Note that I’m not suggesting that the market for high-end smartphones is threatened yet–there is still a lot of innovation that still needs to happen to shape that market into one of mobile computing (vs. mobile phoning).

Instead, what I am suggesting is that the bottom of the phone market is very vulnerable to becoming smart. This may sound like an odd sort of disruption, but it’s a very sinister threat to companies who are in the business of selling brands and not platforms.
technology  mobile  business  nokia  android  google  apple  marketing 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Eleven Brands to Watch in 2011 - Allen Adamson - BrandSimple - Forbes
Last and absolutely not least, especially in this age of transparency, when assessing a brand’s staying power, I take into consideration whether it practices what it preaches. Is it authentic? Consumers want to know the who, what and why behind the brands they buy and they have the digital ways and means to find out. They want the genuine article, literally and figuratively, and any brand that isn’t what it claims to be can expect to feel the results.
marketing  future  technology  politics  transparency  business 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Groupon, Google, and value on the Internet : The New Yorker
When we think about the Internet, we often think of businesses in black-and-white terms: either they’re huge, world-changing hits or they’re flops. But that’s a false dichotomy. These days, the Web is full of good, solid businesses that may not be remaking the world but that are helping give people what they want. If that’s what Groupon ends up being, well, there are worse fates. 
business  google  online  technology  attention  marketing  social  money 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Logic+Emotion: Talk Isn't Cheap
Social technologies empower people to talk about what THEY want to and not about what YOU want them to. So, let's assume for the moment that this statement is a current reality. The next question becomes is there value to letting people talk about what they want to discuss? I believe there is. In fact, I believe that it's better than any focus group your company has ever conducted, and yet it's likely that your company still invests hundreds of thousands of dollars on traditional R&D and focus groups. In some cases these conversations (both positive and negative) leave a considerable "long tail" on the internet which can potentially grow your business or damage your reputation.
marketing  media  online  communication  publicrelations  power  internet  identity  relationships  business  social 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Kanye West Releases My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy and Develops New Side Businesses - The Daily Beast
"There aren’t a hundred brands interested in Kanye like they are Jay-Z. The partners that are interested in him are niche and select. But that’s not a bad thing. He can position himself with brands as exactly what he is, which is a curator of high-end lifestyle products. Instead of being a mile wide and an inch deep, his strategy is to be an inch wide and a mile deep."
hiphop  marketing  business  fashion  music  songwriting 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Is Social Media Driving the Economy? - Richard Florida - Technology - The Atlantic
While social media allows us to connect instantaneously to people all over the globe, the geography of its professional use in the United States is concentrated. The leading social media metros in the U.S. are richer, more technologically advanced, have higher levels of education and higher levels of the creative class, and are more open to diversity of all sorts. The geography of social media thus both reflects and reinforces the increasingly uneven and spiky nature of America's economic landscape.
media  marketing  social  business  economics  gay  diversity  demographics 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Stampede: Razorfish Reveals Latin America's Untapped Digital Consumer | Fast Company
Crump took his eager, former-journalist eyes into the favellas of Brazil to conduct consumer and digital ethnographies and found that a core part of reaching the vastly neglected consumer segment is via social media. Twitter, for example, is growing five times faster in Brazil than in the developed world, says Crump.
twitter  social  brazil  business  research  marketing  latinamerica  southamerica  mobile  facebook 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
‘Mad Men’ Is an Eerie Echo of Advertising Reality - NYTimes.com
“Despite all the changes in advertising, despite all the technological advances, some things never change. No matter how big you are, you’re still dependent on connections, office politics and the whims of the clients.”
marketing  television  1960s  amctv  reputation  attention  business 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Rapleaf’s Web: How You Are Profiled on the Web: Tech News «
To be clear, I don’t have old-fashioned notions about privacy on the Internet. I know the realities of today’s Internet life. In order to enjoy the convenience of using web-based services, one has to make some sacrifices, and living socially online will eventually lead to an erosion of privacy. However, what I find egregious is how the information is surreptitiously collected all over the web, then aggregated to be sold, without us having any control or ability to look into that data. Sure we can opt out, but only if we know that we’re being profiled. (Ironically, you have to register to opt-out.)
identity  internet  privacy  security  email  marketing  business  media  power  reputation 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Identity and The Independent Web - John Battelle's Searchblog
In other words, perhaps it's time for a Revealed Identity, as opposed to a Public or Dependent Identity. [...]

I think it's worth defining a portion of the web as a place where one can visit and be part of a conversation without the data created by that conversation being presumptively sucked into a sophisticated response platform - whether that platform is Google, Blue Kai, Doubleclick, Twitter, or any other scaled web service. Now, I'm all for engaging with that platform, to be sure, but I'm also interested in the parts of society where one can wander about free of identity presumption, a place where one can chose to engage knowing that you are in control of how your identity is presented, and when it is revealed.

One thing I’m certain of: Who I am according to Google, or Facebook, or any number of other scaled Dependent Web services, is not necessarily who I want to be as I wander this new digital world. I want more instrumentation, more nauance, and more rights.
identity  internet  privacy  reputation  marketing  business  power  social  relationships  technology  google  facebook  anonymity 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Poynter Online - The Biz Blog - USA Today's "Radical Restructuring" Means End of Newsroom Integration, Universal Desk
Part of the lengthy internal research that led to the changes, Hunke said, was a conclusion that USA Today and other newspapers may have gotten off track trying to woo young audiences or women with a something-for-everyone approach. He has concluded that the print edition should now mainly target an older, general news audience, who favor a traditional presentation.

By contrast, Hunke said, early data on digital tablet buyers indicate that they skew 10 to 15 years younger than the typical print reader. That suggests both a different style of presentation and a different content mix.
journalism  editing  business  media  news  tablet  ipad  newspapers  gannett  marketing 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Email Still Tops Facebook for Keeping in Touch - eMarketer
Email is a more targeted form of sending content; while content-sharers may shoot off mass emails to large distribution lists, most email shares are likely sent to a person or small group selected based on the specific content being shared.

Sharing via social networks like Facebook, by contrast, typically involves feeding items to an entire friends list. The youngest users, who care the least about whether the recipients of their content actually want to see it, are also most likely to disseminate the information to the widest group. And the seniors and older boomers who find the recipients' needs more important dramatically favor email for sharing, suggesting they are sending relevant items to only those who will want them.
email  facebook  social  news  media  journalism  marketing  research  socialmedia  demographics 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Corner Office - Turn Insecurity Into Strength, Starbucks’ Chief Says - Question - NYTimes.com
People ask me what’s the most important function when you’re starting an organization or setting up the kind of culture and values that are going to endure.

The discipline I believe so strongly in is H.R., and it’s the last discipline that gets funded. Marketing, manufacturing — all these things are important. But more often than not, the head of H.R. does not have a seat at the table. Big mistake.
business  ethics  culture  identity  marketing  starbucks  coffee 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
You Are What You Sell: A Look into the Ad World - Modern Luxury Manhattan - Style
“It is no longer good enough to market on the basis of a product’s superiority point. You’ve got to find a belief that a brand can own in a credible way, so people can feel a sense of shared value.”
marketing  identity  nyc  communication  ethics 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz: 'creepy' Facebook is biggest rival - USATODAY.com
Q: You are starting a local news operation for San Francisco. Tell us about your plans to offer local information.

A: We all live in a place. You live in small communities, and you are very interested in what happens in those communities from police blotters to what happened in the city council or the neighborhood watch. It is interesting to the consumer.

And it is interesting to the advertiser because it is the ultimate target. Statistics are 95% of our purchases are (made) within 2 miles of our house, 5 miles of our house.
media  local  journalism  yahoo  technology  mobile  marketing  information  news  sanfrancisco  bayarea  community  facebook  social 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Smartphones bring mixed blessings for newspapers | Media | guardian.co.uk
The report found that men were almost 50% more likely to access the mobile internet using some form of app than women. About 46% of men who access mobile media use an app to do so, whereas just 35% of women do. Overall about 70% of UK users of mobile internet devices did so using a traditional browser, similar to the percentage for PCs – with 55% also opting to use an app.

Steve Ricketts, the Orange head of mobile commerce and marketing, said that one reason for the preference for mobile browsers over apps was because in the UK brands and retailers had made significant investment into developing websites that were easy to use via a mobile phone.
mobile  newspapers  research  men  women  technology  media  journalism  marketing  business  shopping 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
CNN's research says 27% of us share 87% of news links | Media | guardian.co.uk
"Though recommended news seems highly unpredictable, we've have identified a number of key drivers and key motivations, so we do have some ways of understanding what people share and why they share," he said. "There's more engagement in emotional terms with content and advertising in the recommended scenario, as opposed to randomly consumed content advertising, and brands that are around recommended stories also benefit from stronger recognition and recall."
news  media  public  attention  journalism  newspapers  social  marketing  business 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Apple Logo Is an Agnostic's Crucifix, Star of David: Study | Fast Company
"Brands are a signal of self-worth," said Gavan Fitzsimons, professor of marketing and psychology at Duke. "We're signaling to others that we care about ourselves and that we feel good about ourselves and that we matter in this world. It's more than 'I'm hip or cool'...I'm a worthwhile person, and I matter, and you should respect me and think that I'm a good person, because I've got the D&G on my glasses."
marketing  apple  technology  religion  psychology  identity 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Why Media Companies Shouldn't Accept Apple's Subscription Plans (by @baekdal) #publishing
You are no longer selling newspapers; you are selling news. Content that cannot be limited to specific devices.

The job for media companies is to make highly valuable news articles, and monetized that in a way that doesn't limit, but enables.

For subscriptions that means; one subscription = use everywhere.

Not Apple's, "subscribe to an iPad only version, and give us 30%, loose direct contact with your audience."

My suggestion to the companies currently in talks with Apple is simple. If you cannot convince Apple to allow you to use your own subscription models, in your own apps, forget about the App store.

Create an amazing rich-media HTML5 web app instead, and use offline storage to allow people to read it on the go.
newspapers  media  magazines  ipad  apple  journalism  business  technology  marketing  attention  publishing 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
This Is Your Brain on Technophobia. Any Questions? | techyum ::
[...] The sickness, as I see it, is not tech addiction but consumerism. Disagree with me? Then explain why all discussions of technology in the media are governed by the assumption that there’s an “average” consumer — and that said consumer is professional, college-educated, middle-class, and presumably white? And then explain why, if you hang out at the emergency room in East Oakland at three in the morning, you see a hell of a lot more people texting than you’ll ever see at a high-end cafe?

These panicked discussions of technology focus on the behavior of those perceived as having average interests and “typical” behaviors. But this very idea is bankrupt, and assumes a life made fantastically rich by such “average” interests — by implication, said interests being family, God, and middle-of-the-road politics.

But I contain multitudes, bitch. What about the people, like me, for whom learning and reading were agony until computers made it interactive? [...]
technology  mobile  marketing  psychology  journalism  radio  npr  race 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Holman W. Jenkins, Jr.: Google and the Search for the Future - WSJ.com
Let's say you're walking down the street. Because of the info Google has collected about you, "we know roughly who you are, roughly what you care about, roughly who your friends are." Google also knows, to within a foot, where you are. Mr. Schmidt leaves it to a listener to imagine the possibilities: If you need milk and there's a place nearby to get milk, Google will remind you to get milk. It will tell you a store ahead has a collection of horse-racing posters, that a 19th-century murder you've been reading about took place on the next block.

Says Mr. Schmidt, a generation of powerful handheld devices is just around the corner that will be adept at surprising you with information that you didn't know you wanted to know. "The thing that makes newspapers so fundamentally fascinating—that serendipity—can be calculated now. We can actually produce it electronically," Mr. Schmidt says.
android  google  location  mobile  privacy  search  seo  future  marketing 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
On the Web's Cutting Edge, Anonymity in Name Only - WSJ.com
Calculating "bits" gets complex, as some facts about a person are more valuable—and thus have more "bits"—than others. ZIP codes and birthdates, for instance, are extremely valuable when zeroing in on individuals.

Bottom line: Mr. Eckersley determined Mr. Burney's location (the small town of Avon, Colo.) and his Nielsen demographic segment ("God's Country") together offered about 26.5 bits of information that could be used to identify Mr. Burney individually.

That's enough to narrow him down to one of just 64 or so people world-wide.
anonymity  privacy  online  marketing  identity  data  information 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Information That Is Needed to Identify You: 33 Bits - Digits - WSJ
How many pieces of information are needed to identify an individual? In the field of re-identification science, it’s 33 “bits,” specifically “33 bits of entropy.” (Information-science researchers refer to random pieces of information as “entropy.”)

Why 33? Because a “bit” is computer lingo for an on-off switch that can have only two values, 0 or 1. And 2 multiplied by itself 33 times is a bit more than the number of people on earth — 6.6 billion. Two to the 32nd power is lower than the world’s population. So, in theory, it takes at least 33 “bits” of information to uniquely identify someone — getting the pool of people down to 20, which equals one.

Each piece of information you add reduces the pool of possible individuals. But not every data point is worth the same number of “bits.”
privacy  twitter  mathematics  science  marketing  identity  technology 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Is BlackBerry Doomed to Be North America's Nokia? | Fast Company
They never hit home runs, either, but they don't strike out.
Nokia strikes out. Nokia releases misguidedly ambitious phones, phones with amazing advanced features and crippling inadequacies. Last year's N97 is a perfect example: The N97 has a two-way FM radio (so you can listen to radio or beam it out to a car, like an FM transmitter), tons of storage, full Flash playback, and 3D maps. Yet it's also ruined by lousy internals (a pokey processor and crappy screen), a terrible app store, a confusing interface, and inconsistent navigation. BlackBerry would never release a phone like that.
So is BlackBerry the next Nokia? No. But unless the company shakes things up for consumers, it's going to continue to lose ground (as it did last quarter) until the only ones left are corporate customers and die-hards.
mobile  nokia  technology  blackberry  marketing  northamerica 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Selling Sex And Symphonies: The Image Of Women In Classical Music : NPR
Do these images reflect what you see in the record stores for classical music? How do they compare to the album covers you see for male performers, if at all? Do these representations spill over into the concert-hall performances that you attend?
classical  classicalmusic  music  marketing  women  beauty  power  feminism  business 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Morning in America: It's All About the Local News | TheWrap.com
[...] The one most often spun by station managers is that lifestyles have changed: They’ll cite market research showing people are waking earlier for longer commutes and also building in time for pre-work routines such as the gym. And they have research showing these people want fresh news and information.

The more important reason is that these early risers are advertisers’ darlings. They’re usually employed, interested in what’s going on in the world, younger than news’ aging audiences and have some money to spend – whether at McDonald’s, the home decorating store or the cineplex. That’s why you’ll see big-brand advertisers all over the 5 a.m. broadcasts, while bail bondsmen and truck-driving training commercials populate 5 p.m. [...]
television  class  marketing  media  journalism  news  sleep  attention  radio 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The web isn't killing newspapers, advertisers are - CNN.com
The funny thing about Google is that it has tried to master almost every sort of business. It's investing in windmills, it's investing in mobile phones, it wants to lay cable for high speed internet connections, just to name a few. Yet, for all the businesses it has tried, there's one it says it has no interest in: print content like newspapers.

The reason? Making money on newspapers, and getting advertisers interested in spending again on print publications, has even the big brains at Google stumped.
journalism  media  newspapers  online  google  marketing  search 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
It's Time to Prepare for the End of the Web as We Know It - Advertising Age - Steve Rubel
Mobile devices, by their nature, force users to become more mission-oriented. As more internet consumption shifts to gadgets, it's increasingly becoming an app world and we just live in it. Innovation, fun, simplicity and single-purpose utility will rule while grandiose design and complexity will fall by the wayside.

It won't be enough just to build branded mobile applications that repurpose content across all of the different platforms. That's like newspapers taking the print experience and replicating it on the web as they tried back in the 1990s. Rather, we will need to rethink, remix and repackage information for an entirely different modality than platforms of yore.
computing  design  digital  future  internet  marketing  media  mobile  social  socialnetworking  strategy 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Tyler Brûlé, Media Maverick - BusinessWeek
"People are intrigued by how we manage to charge 50 percent more for subscriptions," he says. "Partly, the subscription gives people access to some Monocle extras, the website archive, and so on. But it is really based on the idea that people want to belong to something that says something about them. ... People will choose what denim they want to wear, and they will choose what newspaper they want to buy, and they want other people to be aware of that, too. Until an iPad is backlit, no one will have any idea that you read Der Spiegel or the Guardian or whatever."

To back this belief, Brûlé is planning a one-off newspaper in the summer full of essays and reportage, all printed on luxurious paper. "[...] Would you take an iPad to the beach? To the pool? No. It's too precious. You can leave your newspaper on your towel and no one will nick it. And the thing about good newsprint is that it actually gets more tactile with a bit of sun and moisture."
magazines  publishing  identity  ipad  newspapers  europe  media  marketing 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Hottest Job in Marketing Might Just Be Community Manager - Advertising Age - CMO Strategy
"One of the dangers of how it's being handled right now is the idea that every brand is going to have a community, and every community is going to have a community manager. The challenge is whether there's really a reason for that community to adhere."
community  engagement  internet  socialmedia  social  media  marketing  business 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
MediaShift . NBC's Ryan Osborn Wants to Use Social Media for Storytelling
Do you have a social media policy as far as what people can say and can't say on their feeds?

Osborn: We have a Standards & Practices which we've spent a long time looking at and our lawyers have worked on. I think my role is communicating that in accessible ways to our newsrooms. Simple things like if you're on a plane and you say you don't like this airline, and then you cover that airline the next week, how will that jeopardize your position as an unbiased reporter or producer? It's something I want our people to start thinking about. The policies are in place but I think we could do a much better job communicating them.

Are there similar rules against talking about competitors or the workplace?

Osborn: No. There are some technicalities, but we want people to be themselves and encourage that; we want them to know that in some way the new reality is that they are representing NBC News and need to think about that. [...]
journalism  marketing  news  socialmedia  television  twitter  story  media 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
This Life - Google Restricts Ads for ‘Cougar’ Sites - NYTimes.com
Google continues to allow similar advertising for the many sites that match older men and younger women, like DateAMillionaire.com, which assures its clients they can meet “sugar babies.”

So cougars and cubs are out, but sugar daddies and sugar babies are in.
dating  relationships  love  technology  google  men  women  power  internet  marketing  sex 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
1000heads :: The Word of Mouth People :: Media140 Oxford: Brand anthropomorphism
It’s all very easy to throw around buzzwords such as human, transparent and authentic, but what on earth do they really mean for a brand? Using my deck below I talked through the three dilemmas of brand anthropomorphism - self-perception clashing with reality, selective sociability and the complexity of authenticity - and offered some ways to build relationships with consumers as a personal, but efficient and consistent, company.
1000heads: Brand anthropomorphism
View more presentations from 1000heads .

The key takeaway? Authenticity is a construct, as much for an individual as a business. That can be hard to square with our ideas about ’natural’ self, but actually once you realise the tactics needed to make people feel an authentic connection with you - starting with listening to them, and adapting yourself to their needs - it’s a very liberating and indeed ‘real’ thing.
reputation  marketing  business  uk 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
M.I.A.: Unlike Lady Gaga, I won't be 'blindfolded with naked men feeding me apples' | Pop & Hiss | Los Angeles Times
We’re past the point in culture of really caring if our pop stars are “authentic” or not, and we derive a lot of genuine pleasure from the sounds and imagery of “faking it.” But M.I.A.’s take underscores a more valid criticism – that even if a star is contrived, at least be contrived to fascinating ends. No one really touches Gaga on red carpet photogenic qualities, and she’s got an undeniable instrument in that voice.
identity  music  aesthetics  marketing  attention  culture  business  power  pop 
april 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Apple’s iPad, General Motors, and the shrinking middle of the consumer market : The New Yorker
This doesn’t mean that companies are going to abandon the idea of being all things to all people. If you’re already in the middle of the market, it’s hard to shift focus—as G.M. has discovered. And the allure of a big market share is often hard to resist, even if it doesn’t translate into profits. According to one estimate, Nokia has nearly twenty times Apple’s market share, but the iPhone alone makes almost as much money as all Nokia’s phones combined. But making money by selling moderately good products that are moderately expensive isn’t going to get any easier, which suggests a slight rewrite of the old Highland ballad. You take the high road, and I’ll take the low road, and we’ll both be in Scotland afore the guy in the middle.
apple  business  marketing  economics  newyorker  design  globalization  ikea  ipad  nokia  mobile 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
OK Go's Damian Kulash on leaving Capitol Records | Pop & Hiss | Los Angeles Times
“We only want to understand the logistics of the record business as long as it keeps us afloat creatively,” Kulash said. “Whenever I read music business magazines or blogs, I get nauseous. With the op-eds, we’re usually just chugging along as band, and when something gets in the way, I’ll say, ‘This counters common sense’ and write about it. But my great fear now is that if every musician is their own business, we’ll be self-selective towards very calculating musicians. I don’t think that being a clear thinker and being a great musician are mutually exclusive, but that’s not historically the trend."
music  business  video  marketing  corporations  entrepreneurs  identity  online 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The iPad business model for news: Strategies publishers must embrace » Nieman Journalism Lab
One thing is for sure: No retailer, no marketing executive, no ad agency anywhere is looking to spend more money in any part of any newspaper. (Well, maybe you could find a few.) By and large, they’re looking to build more direct connections with consumers on digital platforms. And they see the iPad as the Next Big Thing.
news  journalism  newspapers  marketing  mobile  apple  publishing  media  social 
february 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Capitals continue to reach out to fans through social networking - washingtonpost.com
Ted Leonsis: "What's unique and different about us is that most organizations are managed [with the thinking], 'We're bricks and mortar, we're buildings, and we have this Web operation aside us' [...] We're kind of different. We look at the Web as being our basic power plant, kind of like electricity, so the Web and communicating in this fashion is second nature to us now. It's not like we go brochure, television, mail. It's Web, and then everything else. It's social media first, and everything else."
marketing  business  sports  socialmedia  social  washington  hockey  identity  blogging 
february 2010 by allaboutgeorge
PaidContent.org: What Many Media Companies Don’t Get About Building An Audience | paidContent
Distributing across multiple channels in real-time – and cannibalizing existing lines of business—isn’t just the right thing to do. History will reflect that this is the only thing to do. Here’s the key fact for media companies to remember: The value of a customer who doesn’t watch a TV show or a movie is $0.
media  journalism  marketing  business  internet  television  community  cable  attention  newspapers 
january 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Next Year in Media - The Daily Beast
The point is, those who diversified across platforms and invested in themselves in 2009 are now positioned to go on to the next thing. Is that disloyal to your employer? Of course not—smart employers will recognize the value in personal brand extension, and encourage it. It's only the weak and unconfident that are threatened by such things. 2010 has no time for you.
journalism  media  attention  identity  marketing  business 
january 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Vital Signs - Study Finds Women Wear Shoes That Cause Pain - NYTimes.com
“I think women need to really pay attention to how a shoe fits and realize that what you’re buying could have potential effects on your feet for the rest of your life,” said the paper’s lead author, Alyssa B. Dufour, a doctoral student in biostatistics at Boston University. “It’s important to pay attention to size and width, and not just buy it because it’s cute.”
fashion  marketing  women  men  health  science  research  massachusetts  beauty  gender 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Restaurants Use Menu Psychology to Entice Diners - NYTimes.com
“We thought long and hard about the psychology because this is a complete relaunch of a restaurant entirely through its menu and through the psychology of the menu,” Mr. Meyer said. “The chefs write the music and the menu becomes the lyrics, and sometimes the music is gorgeous and it’s got the wrong lyrics and the lyrics can torpedo the music.”
music  food  business  psychology  marketing  design  attention  songwriting 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
SFGate.com: Oakland gets a taste for gourmet
The best part, Hackett said, is that doing business in Oakland is about a third of the price of San Francisco, where the minimum wage is $1.79 more an hour. In addition, San Francisco businesses with more than 20 employees are required under the Health Care Security Ordinance to pay $1.23 an hour extra per worker. That amount goes up 8 cents in January, and rises to $1.96 for San Francisco restaurants with more than 100 employees. The city also requires restaurants to compensate full-time staff nine days of sick pay.
eastbay  bayarea  oakland  food  restaurants  marketing  sanfrancisco  business  employment  work  jobs 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The Song Decoders at Pandora - NYTimes.com
It’s the “social” theories of music-liking that get most of the attention these days: systems that connect you with friends with similar tastes, or that rely on “collaborative filtering” strategies that cross-match your music-consumption habits with those of like-minded strangers. These popular approaches marginalize traditional gatekeepers; instead of trusting the talent scout, the radio programmer or the music critic, you trust your friends (actual or virtual), or maybe just “the crowd.”
Pandora’s approach more or less ignores the crowd. It is indifferent to the possibility that any given piece of music in its system might become a hit. The idea is to figure out what you like, not what a market might like. More interesting, the idea is that the taste of your cool friends, your peers, the traditional music critics, big-label talent scouts and the latest influential music blog are all equally irrelevant. That’s all cultural information, not musical information.
media  music  internet  nytimes  pandora  attention  reputation  marketing  business  oakland  technology  listening  aesthetics 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Apple: Finding Even More Uses for iTunes - BusinessWeek
Rather than products that are downloaded on a one-way basis to a specific device, couldn't iTunes become the back end for a new generation of cloud-based services? Already there are scores of applications on the iPhone that tap Web data. Why not make iTunes part of that cloud?

Give app developers a set of unique services found only on iTunes they can put to work to make their applications smarter. Call it the iTunes Cloud.
apple  technology  software  itunes  osx  marketing 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Computerworld: Apple immune to Windows 7 impact, analyst says
"I analyzed the impact of the last four Windows launches and found no negative correlation between them and Mac sales," said Brian Marshall of Broadpoint AmTech. "In fact, [Microsoft's launches] almost act like a delayed accelerant on Mac sales."

After comparing Mac sales with the launches of Windows 98 in June 1998, Windows 2000 (February 2000), Windows XP (October 2001) and Vista (January 2007), Marshall found that in all but the case of Windows 2000, Mac sales either increased or stayed steady.
apple  mac  macbook  windows  computers  technology  marketing 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Computerworld: Google leak points to imminent iMac, MacBook refresh
Stephen Baker, an analyst with retail research firm NPD Group, echoed those comments today. "I think we'll see a $799 MacBook and a $999 MacBook in the next few days," Baker said Monday. "I can't see how Apple wouldn't go there."

Apple's current low-end notebook is the white-cased MacBook, which lists for $999, and is slightly discounted online by others, such as Amazon, which sells the laptop for $978.

Apple frequently introduces new products or tweaked existing lines on Tuesdays, something that has fueled speculation that the company could unveil new iMac, Mac Mini and MacBook models as soon as tomorrow.
apple  macbook  computers  imac  google  marketing  europe 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
WordPress, Twitter, the Elks Club: 10 new routines at a news startup » Nieman Journalism Lab
“I wouldn’t trade this job for anything,” he said. “Mary and I were both reflecting the other day on the fact that if there were an opportunity to become an employee of another entity doing pretty much the same thing, there would be no way.”

“I’m not a very good cog,” Askins went on. “If we had to apply for jobs, I wouldn’t hire me. I would say, ‘That guy’s tasted what it feels like to be his own boss.’”
journalism  media  marketing  newspapers  online  news  local  innovation  leadership  michigan  annarbor 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Hello baby, goodbye chemicals - The Globe and Mail
Food is major. But I can't afford to buy all organic and I don't think most people can. So [for] bananas or other things with thick rinds, which I know are less susceptible to pesticides, I don't buy organic. But meat products, it's always organic, especially the dairy. Second is any cleaning products. I get the organic stuff from the health-food store or I make my own, and that's with baking soda, water, vinegar and maybe a bit of lemon. If I use any shampoo or soap on my daughter, I buy them at the health-food store and the less ingredients, the better. And I got Song Ji [her daughter] an organic mattress – that was a big-ticket item for me but that's where she spends most of her life.
children  health  marketing  parenting  business  documentary  film  southkorea  canada 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Rating Attractiveness: Consensus Among Men, Not Women, Study Finds
"As far as we know, this is the first study to investigate whether there are differences in the level of consensus male and female raters have in their attractiveness judgments," Wood says. "These differences have implications for the different experiences and strategies that could be expected for men and women in the dating marketplace."
women  men  relationships  sex  gender  culture  psychology  science  beauty  marketing 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
FT.com / Telecoms - Nokia aims to seize the limelight in smartphone market
"You need products with that wow factor that people entering a store can aspire to, even if they cannot afford to buy it.

"Nokia has the challenge of young consumers saying, 'My dad has a Nokia, so why would I want one?' They've got to make themselves cool again."
nokia  mobile  marketing  youth  usa  apple  iphone  attention 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The Good Enough Revolution: When Cheap and Simple Is Just Fine
We get our breaking news from blogs, we make spotty long-distance calls on Skype, we watch video on small computer screens rather than TVs, and more and more of us are carrying around dinky, low-power netbook computers that are just good enough to meet our surfing and emailing needs. The low end has never been riding higher.
marketing  business  technology  economics  video  publishing  society  photography  computers  email  news  media  journalism 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
SwebApps, Mobile Roadie Try to Democratize iPhone Apps - TIME
"In a few years, mobile apps will be to businesses what sites are today," says Chocano. "They'll serve as a product catalog, a shopping tool, a social-media resource, a way to gather client information, a media gallery — all on the go, at your customer's fingertips."
mobile  marketing  shopping  business  cities  social  information  media  iphone  google  apple 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Feature Phones Comprise Overwhelming Majority of Mobile Phone Sales in Q2 2009
“Feature phones are taking on more of the physical characteristics of smartphones, and often offer greater exposure to carrier services,” Rubin said. “Although their user interfaces continue to improve, the depth of their applications generally lags behind those of smartphones. With the price gap between smartphones and feature phones narrowing, to remain competitive feature phones need to develop a better Web experience, drive utility via widgets, and sidestep the applications arms race.”
mobile  apple  nokia  marketing  technology  business  web 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Bauble economy / Does a fictional story written about a cheap thrift-store object make it more valuable?
"The funny thing is, whatever the real story of that fop figurine is, it's been completely obliterated ... Whoever really designed it, whatever they really had in mind, whatever their real target market was, whatever meanings preceded -- all that has been obliterated in a matter of a few hours. It enters into this new ecosystem, and the meaning comes out the other side, and it's completed by the buyer."
marketing  writing  creativity  economics  attention  online  story  money 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
NewsFuturist: The Myth of Regular Readership vs. 15 minutes of fame
Very few visitors are the diehard daily loyalists we imagine come to us for all the day's package of news. The web browsing experience does not involve long, deep stays on one domain.
News is shared via links among social networks and various types of aggregators and organizers.

Each site gets its 15 minutes of fame a month. If you think you can force users to pay for access, can you think of any service you use for 15 minutes a month that you would pay regular fees for? Especially if you could get a similar service elsewhere for free?
newspapers  journalism  media  reading  attention  online  blogging  marketing  business  web 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
AFTER STAFF - Nader Khouri, Commercial success with an emphasis on food | RESOLVE — the liveBooks photo blog
Many photographers don’t have much text on their websites, and I decided to use text to help put my work into context. Not all clients will look at the text, but I value it when photographers take the time to give some explanation. I believe in the power of images to give a point of view, but I also think that stating a mission helps complement the images. Not only that, but it helps set the stage for the kinds of expectations I have for myself and of the clients I want to work with.
photography  business  marketing  creativity  food  ethics  aesthetics 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
BBC NEWS | Business | Africa's mobile banking revolution
While countries like Kenya, South Africa and much of North Africa are approaching 100% mobile penetration, in Burundi, the Central African Republic, Eritrea, and Rwanda it is less than 30%.

Low incomes, illiteracy and large signal black spots are all obstacles to the sale and use of mobile phones. Taxes, which can be as high as 30% in countries like Tanzania and Uganda, are also a disincentive.
business  internet  mobile  africa  finance  marketing 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
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