allaboutgeorge + fiction   197

'Blade Runner 2049': Why some science fiction writers are tired of dystopias - CSMonitor.com
“The utility dystopian fiction used to serve was to bring problems to our attention and seek solutions. But the danger is that these stories can become a collective act of despair in response to current events.”
story  fiction  movies  attention  aesthetics  sciencefiction  scifi 
5 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Pynchon Takes On Silicon Alley - NYTimes.com
Mr. Pynchon, the secretive and widely followed author, is set to publish a new book titled “Bleeding Edge” that has Manhattan’s Silicon Alley as its setting, the publisher, Penguin Press, announced on Monday. The release date is Sept. 17.

The novel, set in 2001, takes place in “the lull between the collapse of the dot-com boom and the terrible events of September 11,” Penguin said in a release announcing its 2012 results.
nyc  technology  novels  writing  books  fiction  publishing  september11 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Seeing the Future in Science Fiction : The New Yorker
By 1964, when I was negotiating puberty in the chill deeps of the Cold War, history itself had become the Atomic Disintegrator. In those years, I was drawn to science fiction (and mainly to its prose forms) for the evidence it offered of manifold possibilities of otherness. To a curious, anxious, white male child coming of age in an incurious and paranoid white monoculture, there was literally nothing like it—though a great deal of science fiction, possibly the majority of it, I was starting to notice, depicted futuristic monocultures that were dominated by white males. The rest, however, had as much to do with making me the person I am today as anything else did. Things might be different, science fiction told me, and different in literally any way you could imagine, however radical.
sciencefiction  literature  newyorker  fiction  identity  1960s 
june 2012 by allaboutgeorge
Why You Love "The Wire," Explained In Fascinating Detail | Co.Create: Creativity Culture Commerce
"That’s a very interesting question, because one of the main reasons I wanted to explore the video essay format was that I felt it could help bridge the gap between academic and journalistic film criticism," says Lavik. "Film scholarship has become so highly specialized, and often esoteric, that much of it does not even attempt to speak to anyone outside of the research community. Journalistic film criticism, on the other hand, often lacks ambition, I think, and functions merely as a form of consumer guidance. Writers rarely give their readers anything to reach for. Everything is pre-digested for you. The video essay I made is obviously meant for people who have already seen The Wire, but I hope most of those who are familiar with the show will be able to follow my arguments and observations. I certainly don’t think anyone will find it totally incomprehensible. But so what if there’s something you don’t understand? You’re watching it online, so Google it! Coming across something you don’t comprehend is not a cause for offense, but an opportunity to learn.
video  film  criticism  television  baltimore  fiction  journalism  writing  media  story 
april 2012 by allaboutgeorge
The Millions : Embracing The Other I Am; or, How Walt Whitman Saved My Life
This is why Walt Whitman, or you, or I can cock our hats as we please indoors or out, because no matter who we are, we are just as good and just as necessary as everyone else. But for me it also offered a route out of my endless, self-constructed maze of Self. If there is no wall between I and you, if we are all one and the same, what’s the point of hiding one from the other? Why not acknowledge that part of myself that wanted to die? Why not tell someone that while I never wanted to drink again, I was afraid I might lose my mind if I didn’t? Why not tell my parents I wasn’t the perfect son I wanted them to think I was? Why not sit in a church basement full of strangers, as I did once toward the end of that summer, crying like a baby because a woman had left me and I couldn’t blame her? Why not, if only for this one day, dare to be fully and completely alive?
poetry  literature  behavior  fiction  attention 
july 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Spaces Between Stars: The secret connection between crime fiction and science fiction
Science fiction and crime fiction contextualised, explored and reported on rapidly changing and expanding modern conditions.  And they did it in ways that spoke to the felt experiences of our lives, to our hopes and our fears, in ways that other fictions, or even other reportage, couldn't approach.  Science fiction and crime fiction explained to us where we really are, and where we might be going.
fiction  writing  sciencefiction  crime  books 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Stefan Kanfer's Tough Without a Gun: What made Humphrey Bogart so great? - By Tom Shone - Slate Magazine
What lends singularity to Bogart's films is the sense of irreversible actions, with moral consequences, being borne by a man standing as if waist-high in a river, braced by events. The action held him in place. Once things happened to him, they didn't un-happen. He didn't get a do-over. When he got slugged, he rubbed his jaw like a kid coming away from the dentist. "When he sweated you could have wrung his shirt," said François Truffaut, doubtless thinking of the first scene The Big Sleep, in which Marlowe comes across Major Sternwood in his hothouse, living off heat like a newborn spider, surrounded by orchids whose flesh so reminds him of the rotten sweetness of corruption.

"Why did you have to go on?" Lauren Bacall asks him.
"Too many people told me to stop," he replies.
hollywood  identity  acting  movies  film  cinema  books  fiction 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
"Blue Valentine": An extraordinary and sexually frank romance - Andrew O'Hehir, Movie Critic - Salon.com
R.G.: Right. I think Derek didn't want it to be something that you can pin on one event. For him it was a study of: Where does love go? It's there and suddenly it's not, and each person has their own idea of what happened. You can't really pinpoint it as one specific event. It's all of these subtleties that you can't really talk about, and you have to watch and try to understand. He's asking the audience more than he's telling them. He's asking them: Here are these situations, what do you think is going wrong? What's the communication problem?
M.W.: And then it's like a poison. Like, it infiltrates everything. The smallest exchange you just can't get right. You don't know why, and you didn't set out to make it that way, but all the small things are wrong.
love  relationships  cinema  film  movie  fiction  marriage 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
I, Reader by Alexander Chee - The Morning News
The world remains beautiful and terrible at the same time, and either way, I know it doesn’t care what I think or feel about it. There are things to do to help others, and there are things that may never change. But if I learned anything from all of this, it’s my first, oldest lesson as a reader: There is always going to be a book that saves you. There is also a new lesson: You do not know how it will get to you.
writing  attention  books  culture  behavior  fiction  ipad  kindle  reading  nonfiction  relationships 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Scrawl of Duty: Novelists and Journos Defect to Video Game Industry | The New York Observer
"I'd been a journalist for 14 years. I had accomplished most of what I'd wanted to accomplish. I wrote cover stories, I'd written lots of features, I had this blog, I'd been on TV. It felt like there were structural changes affecting journalism, and going to another outlet would be a bit like same shit, different day. I felt like it was time to do something different; it was time to not be a journalist. The main thing to consider was, did I want to try to write games?"
journalism  media  writing  business  games  attention  fiction 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
‘The Walking Dead’ Unleashes Zombies on AMC - Review - NYTimes.com
The one good thing about the walking dead is that they don’t drive.

All it really takes to outrun a zombie is a car. Also, a bullet to the head will stop one cold. And that may explain why so many men prefer zombies to vampires: zombie stories pivot on men’s two favorite things: fast cars and guns. Better yet, zombies almost never talk. Vampires, especially of late, are mostly a female obsession. Works like “Twilight” and “True Blood” suggest that the best way to defeat a vampire is to make him fall so in love that he resists the urge to bite. And that’s a powerful, if naïve, female fantasy: a mate so besotted he gives up his most primal cravings for the woman he loves.

Vampires are imbued with romance. Zombies are not. (Zombies are from Mars, vampires are from Venus.)
zombies  television  amctv  fiction  story  gender  men  women  literature 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
'The Wire' writer David Simon among MacArthur genius grant winners
"I confess to a feeling that I can only describe as a vague sense of shame. It was exacerbated when I went online and looked at the people who'd gotten fellowships in the past. The majority of them are involved in endeavors which are very tangible -- efforts to combat poverty or economic disparities, or to improve the environment. And while I think storytelling is a meaningful way to spend your life . . . it does feel a little bit secondary or off-point. I definitely felt a little sheepish after looking at the list."
story  fiction  genius  awards  writing  journalism  creativity 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Maximus Clarke talks with William Gibson about his “speculative novels of last Wednesday” : Maud Newton
The surprising thing about it — I almost said the insidious thing, but I’m trying to be anthropological — the surprising thing, to me, is that once we have our gramophone, or iPad, or locomotive, we become that which has the gramophone, the iPad, or the locomotive, and thereby, are instantly incapable of recognizing what just happened to us, as I believe we’re incapable of understanding what broadcast television, or the radio, or telephony did to us.
I strongly suspect that prior to those things we were something else. In that regard, our predecessors are in a sense unknowable. Imagine a world without recorded music: I always come to the conclusion that it’s impossible for me to imagine that, because I have become that which lives with recorded music.
music  writing  technology  futurism  aesthetics  attention  identity  television  ipad  transportation  sciencefiction  novels  fiction 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Books of The Times - ‘Skippy Dies’ by Paul Murray - NYTimes.com
“Maybe instead of strings it’s stories things are made of, an infinite number of tiny vibrating stories; once upon a time they all were part of one big giant superstory, except it got broken up into a jillion different pieces, that’s why no story on its own makes any sense, and so what you have to do in a life is try and weave it back together, my story into your story, our stories into all the other people’s we know, until you’ve got something that to God or whoever might look like a letter or even a whole word....”
story  books  fiction  time  ireland  attention  beauty  physics 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
io9: China Miéville explains theology, magic, and why JJ Abrams hates you
I don't have any fantastic insight, but I think it's simply that cities to varying degrees are amazing palimpsests of history and cultures. They're coagulated together, a mixing of social norms. I like the temporal dislocation of cities, where you get 17th century buildings next to 21st buildings in London. The world is divided between people who like fractured mixed up stuff, and those who like clean aesthetic totality. I'm more the former.

The majority of humanity now live in cities. They are the site of most political and financial drivers - that's just a fact of economy. They are the site of this kind of chaotic aggregation of ideas that's going to translate into a sensation of the fantastic. That's why fantastic city fiction is so strong – it's about translating enchantment into a modern urban environment.
cities  urban  geography  population  fiction  economy  writing  sciencefiction  history  architecture 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
James Franco Fiction - Just Before the Black by James Franco - Esquire
I sit in the driver's seat of my grandfather's old DeVille. It is night out and cool. Me and Joe, we just sit.

We're out in front of the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course pro shop. It's a tan building with white trim. It's where Joe and I work during the day.

We sit here because it's dark here, and there are no lights outside this building. We're stopped for no reason except that the night is still going and we're drunk, and who wants to go home, ever, and this spot is as good as any to just sit in the shadows and let life slow.

My window is cracked, just a bit, and the air plays on my forehead like a cold whisper.
books  fiction  literature  writing  story  toread 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Mapping out alternative universes for Texas
What if we had made Cuba a state in 1902? A major Cold War near-catastrophe could have been averted, but would the United States have had to put down a socialist uprising in the late 1950s anyway?

What if water-rich northernmost California had split off to become Shasta in 1957 and got rich selling water to what was left of California? Humboldt County suddenly has a lot more money and power.

What if Brigham Young had gotten his wish for a state called Deseret, which would have encompassed modern-day Utah, nearly all of Nevada, most of Arizona, a hunk of New Mexico and the part of California that includes San Diego? Hard to see polygamy dying without a serious fight in a state that large.
geography  usa  politics  history  mapping  power  books  fiction  texas  california  cuba  time 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Journalists Who Write Novels - Moving From Newswriting to Fiction
"When a you're a reporter you're writing about the facts of the situation, about very specific incidents, and it doesn't go beyond that," he says. "When you're writing fiction it's all about meaning and how things feel to your characters.

"You have to get out of your own point of view. In a story, don't think about how you would respond to a certain situation; think about how your characters would respond."
journalism  creativity  fiction  writing  books  news 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Gen X Has a Midlife Crisis - NYTimes.com
“If I were the protagonist of a book or a movie,” Milo says to his onetime boss, “it would be hard to like me, to identify with me, to like me, right?” The response is devastating: “I would never read a book like that, Milo, and I can’t think of anyone who would. There’s no reason for it.”

A lot of people seem to feel that way about “Greenberg,” which has done modest business and inspired a great deal of ambivalence among audiences. “Funny People” was a big flop, and “Hot Tub Time Machine” has not done nearly as well as “The Hangover,” which offers up coarse humor and male immaturity without the slightest attempt at historical perspective. Since its publication in March, “The Ask” has sold around 7,000 copies. Disappointing? Of course. Our generation wouldn’t have it any other way.
aging  marriage  criticism  movies  1980s  1990s  relationships  fiction 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Illustrations for I-Hotel Book | lelandwong on Xanga
It's semi-fiction about the decade from 1967 to 1977 and the Asian American community. The book consists of ten novellas which has one of my illustrations at the beginning of each.

I used a technique that I never formally used before and that was with a Chinese brush and Chinese ink. Then going back in there with a wash to get the middle tones. I did some photoshopping on the images afterwards.
books  asian  asianamerican  sanfrancisco  novel  fiction  drawing  creativity  art  ethnicity  california 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Bringing vampires back home? | Reuters
"The new breed of vampires are far from monstrous, they are glamorous and sexy and have an emotional side," she said. "Their (teenagers') attraction to vampire figures provides a safe way for them to acknowledge these desires."
movies  books  fiction  creativity  sex  power  conferences 
april 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Summer reading - Page 3 - Salon.com
Forty years on, readers can look back at a plot trajectory -- boy meets girl; girl meets bad girl; girl meets good girl; girl meets closeted-superstar girl; girl finds true love -- that melds mistaken identities and molten love scenes, via melodramatic prose, into a satisfying whole.
books  fiction  gay 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Gene Weingarten - XXX for the XX Set: Women's erotica isn't just dirty. It's nice and dirty. - washingtonpost.com
Me: If men read these books, they'd be terrified.

Kate: Why?

Me: Because what it makes clear is that, in comparative literary terms, female sexuality is James Joyce's "Ulysses" and male sexuality is "The Hardy Boys."

Kate: I won't argue with that.

Me: How can we ever hope to compete with your expectations?

Kate: Interesting. That's what we say about the material you guys use for arousal.

Me: Maybe the answer is for men and women to abandon all these immature fantasies and work tirelessly to find joy and fulfillment in the simple reality of each other's love and understanding.

Kate: You're not very bright, are you? I like that in a man.
sex  writing  fiction  relationships  men  women  reading  creativity  identity  beauty  love  gender  story  art 
february 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Feature Fetishes: Sherlock Holmes vs. Avatar / Violet Blue: Gossip blogs chirp about Holmes' no-bro-mance while Avatar promises us a "sex tape"
[...] You can keep your pretend sex between two straight, nonhuman cartoon characters. That's a fetish in need of a little love, and certainly more widespread acceptance. The rest of us will keep a little something in our front pockets for the next time we're at Baker Street Station, thanks.
movies  cinema  film  fiction  sex  gay  queer 
january 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Douglas Coupland: 'Generation A' loneliness
"Storytelling is ultimately a creative act of pattern recognition," Coupland says. "Through characters, plot and setting, a writer creates places where previously invisible truths become visible. Or the storyteller posits a series of dots that the reader can connect. In times of information upheaval like right now, the attempt to locate patterns is one of the few ways to survive and not be dragged into the churn."
story  books  fiction  sciencefiction  futurism  writing 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Finding self in another culture - Sacramento Living - Sacramento Food and Wine, Home, Health | Sacramento Bee
"When an Indian American writer portrays India, a reader will already have seen five other portrayals in other books and inject what they've seen before," she explained. "That leads readers to overlook other aspects of an immigrant experience."
india  writing  fiction  literature  books  sacramento  identity  culture 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Kurt Vonnegut's 'Look at the Birdie' -- latimes.com
"Shameful days, shameful days," he murmured. "And to think that I was once a respected professional man."
fiction  shortstory  story  writing  losangeles  psychology  photography 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Cross Roads Blues - a novelette by Paul McAuley
he first time Turner heard Robert Johnson play was to a vast crowd in Washington, D.C., December 5th 1945, the night the desegregation bill went through, and just three weeks before Johnson was assassinated. The second time was on what was supposed to be a routine archive trip, June 3rd 1937, a jook joint just outside the little Mississippi town of Tallula, and it was something else.
sciencefiction  scifi  blues  music  fiction 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Why is sex so hard to put into words? - Telegraph
By now, though, I was beginning to learn a few lessons, the first of which is that being convincingly erotic is hideously difficult. It seems the writer can be erotic or convincing, but rarely both at the same time. For this, blame sex itself. The awkward truth is that real sex is often anything but erotic. It is awkward, kinky, funny, tender and messy.
writing  books  fiction  sex  creativity  story  novels  art 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
In recession, sexy paperbacks as cheap entertainment - ContraCostaTimes.com
"The romance industry is doing well ... because in tough times like these, people want to be entertained and they want it to be affordable. Our romance books ... have always guaranteed a happy ending," said Katherine Orr, a spokeswoman for Harlequin Enterprises.
books  love  relationships  fiction  story 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Jon Hamm | TV | A.V. Club
[F]or Don, specifically… he’s not a murderer, but he is an opportunist, and a lot of people can see that as being admirable in some ways. He knows the rules of the game, and he plays it very well.

He’s also often very upfront with what he wants and needs in a certain situation. It goes back to the pilot, when he tells Pete that if he keeps behaving the way he is, he may succeed briefly, but he’ll never truly succeed, because no one will like him, and in this industry, being liked is more important than being effective, in many ways. And that comes back, of course, to bite Pete. He doesn’t learn that lesson, or he learns it too late, when he tries to blackmail Don. So it’s an interesting thing. I don’t necessarily play it any differently. I don’t try to be any more likeable even as I’m doing these reprehensible things. You just hope that the audience has been given enough material and backstory to understand or at least rationalize the character’s behavior, and to see what drives it.
television  story  writing  acting  cable  interviews  fiction  ethics  business 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Salon.com Books | Sex and the (fortysomething) single girl
I've found that characters I've based on real people, if I've disguised them physically, people don't recognize themselves. It's hilarious. They just don't. It never occurs to them that I'm writing about them, because they're not blond. They're not 52. They're not rail-thin or overweight.

So people recognize their physical profile, but not their psychological profile?

Absolutely. And when the two go together, they recognize themselves physically and then they see what I'm saying about them. I've offended a couple of people. But I've never had a person recognize him- or herself whose physical description I've altered. I find that fascinating.
writing  fiction  style  aesthetics  identity  creativity 
july 2009 by allaboutgeorge
To Be Young And 'Fortunate' In 1990s Boomtime : NPR
A Fortunate Age, Joanna Smith Rakoff's sweeping debut novel about 20-something Oberlin grads living in New York City, may turn out to be the long-awaited book that perfectly captures the '90s, that time of social and financial excess that set the stage for the current economic collapse.
books  toread  novels  fiction 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
After newsroom layoff: It’s a mystery » Nieman Journalism Lab
"Google is the enemy of newspapers. Agree or disagree?" "Google doesn’t kill newspapers. People kill newspapers."
google  newspapers  media  novels  books  journalism  online  blogging  twitter  social  public  losangeles  writing  fiction 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
All About Bob: Alt-rock legend Bob Mould talks about his music, his writing and the uncertainty of life: Feature Story at Metro Weekly magazine - News articles from Washington DC newspaper
Rarely can we predict how life is going to go. There are parts of it that are autobiographical, certain lines or stanzas are things that literally happened to me. And then there are things that are completely observational, things that I've overheard at a bar or things that friends have confided. Inside of that, the needle goes back and forth between the two. As I've gotten older, I've realized that in art or in storytelling, there's really not that much difference between fiction and non-fiction. The job is to stand back and let the story unfold. It has to have an emotional connection so that you can tell that story. That's the core of where I'm at as a writer now. That's how life goes. You hope it's going to end better this time, whatever it is. Whether it's something as simple as a conversation, or something as complicated as the passing of a parent or a loved one, you hope the next time you're better equipped for the ending.
songwriting  story  writing  fiction  nonfiction  death  aesthetics  identity  music 
april 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Zack Snyder, 'Watchmen's' watched man - Los Angeles Times
"Twenty years ago my parents wouldn't know who the X-Men were, and now everybody knows that stuff," Snyder said. "It means that deconstruction of the superhero is something you can do. All those movies have led to a point where we can finally have 'Watchmen' with a Superman character who doesn't want to save the world and a Batman who has trouble in bed. Essentially, I want to kill the superhero movie because now we can."
movies  film  fiction  aesthetics  story  comics  cinema 
march 2009 by allaboutgeorge
As doctor and writer, Verghese brings humanity to the practice of medicine - ContraCostaTimes.com
Knowing that tuberculosis would soon kill him, Chekhov felt an urge to travel. His wife took him to a spa in Germany, where a crisis ensued. The spa physician decided to send for an oxygen pillow.

"What's the use, doctor?" Chekhov is reported to have said. "Before that arrives, I will be a corpse."

The doctor changed his mind and ordered champagne.

Chekhov emptied a glass, lay down quietly and died.

"I've done some very unusual things at the bedside," Verghese tells his listeners. "But I don't think I ever would have thought of ordering a bottle of champagne."

He sounds like a doctor who thinks he's been somehow remiss — and like a writer who wishes he'd conjured that ending himself.
medicine  health  death  writing  fiction  creativity  germany 
february 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com From the Author - Lauren Groff - Rooms
I have a friend who writes outdoors. He likes the fresh air, he says, the light, the thousand shifting changes in the world. Outside, his imagination can go wild, like a pet cat that escapes and imagines itself feral until kibble-time.

This friend is the kind of person who makes you drunk with exuberance, and after I heard about his method, I decided that I, too, would become a plein-air scribbler, sunburnt and prolific. For an afternoon, I sat at the park down the street and waited for inspiration to descend like Glinda the Good Witch and touch me with her twinkly wand.

Instead, the white sky above was too much like a blank page, infinite in possibility, and, terrified, I slunk on home. I do best in small, dark places, and would probably write well in a closet, if it weren't for the indignity of sitting amongst the coats.
writing  fiction  shortstory  story  creativity  space  work  aesthetics  memory 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The opinionated Mr. Damon - TV - MiamiHerald.com
''They could never make a James Bond movie like any of the Bourne films,'' Damon says scornfully. "Because Bond is an imperialist, misogynist sociopath who goes around bedding women and swilling martinis and killing people. He's repulsive.

"Steve [Soderbergh, who produced yet another of Damon's spy movies, Syriana] told me that years ago he was offered a Bond movie. He told them he'd do it if they gave him creative control. Absolutely not, they said. They have a formula, they stick to it, and it makes them a lot of money. They know what they're doing, and they're going to keep doing it.''
obama  interview  film  cinema  movies  politics  television  story  writing  fiction 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com From the Author - Jonathan Barnes - 24 and Me
"The two most recent James Bond films have been justly praised for their attempts to examine the effects that the lifestyle of a secret agent would have upon the psychology of their hero, but 24 got there first. Events do not leave Bauer untouched as they might have many of his fictional antecedents — earlier iterations of Bond, say, or Richard Hannay or Bulldog Drummond — but wound him irrevocably." I've seen both recent Bond movies. I've never seen an episode of "24."
movies  cinema  film  story  fiction  writing  creativity  television 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Why I've had enough literary sex - Telegraph
"It is even harder than writing comedy – it's all about pace and timing. And just as not everyone has the same sense of humour, not everyone has the same erotic triggers. But sex sells so sometimes the critical faculties disappear.

"It's the same with art. You can be the most amazing collector but when it comes to erotic pieces, the quality control goes out the window and you end up with something that looks as if it has come from Forum magazine circa 1970."
sex  writing  fiction  uk  humor  shortstory 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Amazon.com: George Kelly's review of Rachel Kramer Bussel's "Bedding Down: A Collection of Winter Erotica"
The blank page can look a lot like a snow-covered field. You enter with a sense of expansion and freedom, watch the trail you leave behind. [...]
sex  fiction  shortstory  reviews  writing  winter 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Wesley Morris' "How gay is that?" - The Boston Globe
To get more decent gay comedies or dramas, a filmmaker needs a delicate balance of frivolity and gravity, and reserve and recklessness - fearlessness, not too many speeches, and a respect for an audience that considers itself no different from other paying customers. Talent and a certain moderation are excellent tools to start transforming more movies you wouldn't see into movies you would.
gay  cinema  film  movies  aesthetics  identity  writing  fiction 
november 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Nerve.com: Obama in the History Books
Excerpted from the prologue of Kenneth Mondschein's America: The First Quarter Millennium, copyright 2026. Some rights reserved.
obama  politics  books  fiction  election  democrats  usa 
november 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com Interviews - Iain Banks
"[...] Presented with something like English, you're almost derelict in your duties if you don't have fun with it, because there's so much fun to be had. You shouldn't just think, 'This is my way of getting information across to you.' No. You should have fun with it. If the writer's having fun, unless you're being hopelessly self-serving, I think you can please other people at the same time, if you do it right. [...]"
english  language  beauty  speech  writing  fiction  creativity  uk  books  interviews 
october 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Wired Magazine: Novelist Neal Stephenson Once Again Proves He's the King of the Worlds
"I could never get that idea, the notion that society in general is becoming aliterate, out of my head. People who write books, people who work in universities, who work on big projects for a long time, are on a diverging course from the rest of society. Slowly, the two cultures just get further and further apart."
literature  libarry  writing  reading  books  fiction  culture  science  history  society  academia  education  philosophy  interview  sciencefiction  time  future 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Jennifer Nix: Resurrecting Literature: Sustenance for the Progressive Soul
"When people ask me why I put photos in The Lazarus Project, I say it is in the hope President Bush would flip through my book. Its main character is not a pet goat, but there is a picture of boobs in it."
bush  literature  history  creativity  writing  fiction  public  social  chicago  war  europe  iraq  police 
july 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powell's Books - PowellsBooks.BLOG - Notes on Narrative
"All the same, you may find much of what follows to be nothing more than common sense. But think of it as a pleasant, country-weekend drive right into the center of a fellow writer's professional advice."
story  writing  fiction  creativity  aesthetics  criticism 
july 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com Interviews - David Benioff
"To me, the best storytellers these days tend to be genre writers, because so much literary fiction has drifted away from the idea of telling a story. Narrative fiction is often looked down upon."
story  fiction  russia  war  creativity  writing  authors  novels  books  shortstory 
july 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Hancock, Obama and the summer of heroes - Los Angeles Times
"Who doesn't want somebody to come save the day when the world is a mess? Life is hard. We are going through bad economic times. The environment is in trouble. There are looming terrorists."
fiction  writing  story  politics  obama  elections  campaigns  creativity  cinema  film  movies 
june 2008 by allaboutgeorge
007 reborn: Exclusive extract from Sebastian Faulks' "Devil May Care"
"This Bond, this solitary hero with his soft shoes and single under-powered weapon, was a man in dreadful danger. You feared for him. And the style was clean, journalistic, devoid of cliché; it was occasionally playful, but it was never arch. It was fun.
writing  creativity  aesthetics  1950s  uk  novels  fiction 
june 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Lara Vapnyar’s Writing Mixes Food and Fiction - NYTimes.com
“Beginning writers often don’t give their characters enough particulars. Food is something that readers can understand.”
food  writing  creativity  aesthetics  russia  nyc  fiction  cooking 
june 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Film - Looking Back at James Bond’s Origins as the Franchise Continues With a New Novel - NYTimes.com
"The only difficulty I had was when I wanted to slow the story down, to allow a page or two for something significant to sink in. I thought that I could draw a little on Bond’s inner life, but I found that Bond doesn’t really have an inner life.”
writing  fiction  novels  books  creativity  uk 
june 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Desert Island: Q&A with Willy Vlautin - Nerve.com Screening Room
"[I]t's a really bad habit to sit there and beat the shit out of yourself. And I've done it. I'm really good at it. I'm trying to be better at that, but fuck man, that's like trying to change who you are."
writing  fiction  creativity  health  drinking  nevada  interviews 
may 2008 by allaboutgeorge
After the Apocalypse - The New York Review of Books
"The horror writer is not content to report on death as the universal system of human weather; he or she chases tornadoes. Horror is Stoicism with a taste for spectacle."
books  criticism  fiction  literature  reading  scifi  reviews  writing  creativity  aesthetics 
may 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Interviews: Scott Esposito Interviews Matthew Sharpe, author of Jamestown
"I’ve tried to communicate with non-human animals, with trees, with rocks and machines, and sometimes I think they’ve tried to communicate with me. The results have been even more uncertain than communications with humans."
writing  fiction  creativity  history  novels  e-mail  internet  blogging  social  yasns  genocide 
may 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com From the Author - Marisa Silver
"I was beginning to understand that people do not say what they mean, not simply because they are liars, but because they often don't know what they mean, or because what they mean is too dark, or too sad, or makes them too fragile."
fiction  creativity  psychology  story  writing 
may 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com Interviews - Jhumpa Lahiri
"I love reading poetry, and yet, at this point, the thought of writing a poem to me is tantamount to figuring out a trigonometry question. ... I feel like I could write a play more easily, because plays are dialogue, and dialogue is an aspect of fiction."
poetry  writing  fiction  novels  books 
april 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com From the Author - Howard Jacobson
"When the logic of your thinking leads you to take your life, you may win the admiration of other men, but you do not help them existentially."
thinking  writing  judaism  religion  israel  uk  novels  fiction  psychology  death 
april 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com Interviews - Willy Vlautin
"Writing at the track is the best. You're surrounded by horses and weirdoes and gamblers and drinkers. All of those things relax me to no end. Plus, whenever you get tired or burned out, you can always bet a race."
books  interview  interviews  portland  creativity  fiction  writing  novels  nevada  drinking 
april 2008 by allaboutgeorge
VF Daily: The Screenwriter’s Valentine: An Interview with Screen Plays Author David S. Cohen: Online Only: vanityfair.com
"'Caveman’s Valentine' is not a bad movie at all. It’s a little esoteric and not wildly commercial. If you rented it, you’d probably enjoy it."
cinema  film  writing  creativity  fiction  business 
april 2008 by allaboutgeorge
NYT: It's Not You, It's Your Books
“I think sometimes it’s better if books are just books. It’s part of the romantic tragedy of our age that our partners must be seen as compatible on every level.”
books  essay  literature  nytimes  reading  relationships  fiction  nonfiction  love  aesthetics  identity 
march 2008 by allaboutgeorge
What Is Jhumpa Lahiri's Hook? -- New York Magazine
"Does John Updike get asked this question? Does Alice Munro? It’s the ethnic thing, that’s what it is. And my answer is always, yes, I will continue to write about this world, because it inspires me to write, and there’s nothing more important than
identity  creativity  writing  fiction  literature  novels  shortstory  story 
march 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com From the Author - Gerard Woodward
"The troubled attitude of the English to alcohol seems often to stem from an anxiety about lack of supply. [...] Managed well, the drinking of alcohol is a beautiful experience — socially cohesive, possibly even enlightening."
alcohol  drinking  beverages  beer  wine  uk  writing  food  families  fiction  social 
march 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Raj, Bohemian: Fiction: The New Yorker
"My taste had been central to my identity. I’d cultivated it, kept it fed and watered like an exotic flowering plant. Now I realized that what I thought had been an expression of my innermost humanity was nothing but a cloud of life-style signals [...]"
newyorker  research  marketing  fiction  shortstory  story  business  corporations  identity 
march 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Abyss & Apex : Fourth Quarter 2007: Wikihistory
Note to self: Send Prometheus6.org a couple of beers for linking to this short story.
comedy  fiction  history  humor  internet  wiki  wikipedia  time  shortstory  story  nazi  scifi  writing 
march 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Lies and consequences | ajc.com
"How is the reading public to trust us as storytellers, historical and cultural documenters, reporters and opinion-shapers if we, the publishing industry, continue to appear unable to distinguish between fact and fiction, truth and mendacity?"
story  publishing  books  journalism  media  writing  fiction  nonfiction  history  culture  reading 
march 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com From the Author - Kim Sunée
"Hush, you'll say / light candles, break bread, / pour wine. Let's practice / the simple, small acts of the living. / Touch me, here / in this quiet kitchen of the night."
poetry  writing  fiction  books  food 
february 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Ian Fleming’s reflection on the limitations of love - Times Online
"[T]he quantum of solace, he says, is a precise figure defining the comfort, humanity and fellow feeling required between two people for love to survive. If the quantum of solace is nil, then love is dead."
cinema  love  relationships  marriage  movies  aesthetics  sex  writing  fiction  mathematics 
january 2008 by allaboutgeorge
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