allaboutgeorge + books   246

Journalist Geeta Dayal on writing as an optimistic act – The Creative Independent
Writing means creating new possibility spaces for what could be, or what could happen. I think that’s a good thing. It’s a very hopeful way of looking at the world—that you have some ability to change the way things are, or that you hope that you can somehow make things better, you know?
writing  journalism  media  criticism  art  arts  music  electronica  books  creativity  research 
3 days ago by allaboutgeorge
Outgrowing Advertising: Multimodal Business Models as a Product Strategy – Andreessen Horowitz
What if, at the point of purchase, you had the option to only buy what you wanted, for the time frame you specified? This type of consumer power is the reality for netizens in China today—because Chinese internet companies have adopted business models that are drastically different than what we see here in the States, especially on mobile.
advertising  china  mobile  business  capitalism  marketing  music  books  video  education 
4 days ago by allaboutgeorge
Kim Stanley Robinson: The Good Anthropocene – Locus Online
The thing about climate change is it’s usually pretty slow. While it will include some quick catastrophes that just slap you in the face, like a big hurricane or fire or flood, it’s more often slow, like the five-year drought we had in California.
climate  literature  books  futurism  science  sciencefiction  writing  nyc  weather 
4 days ago by allaboutgeorge
N.K. Jemisin Is Trying to Keep the World From Ending | GQ
Jemisin is an author who conjures place by building a people. What they value, what they believe, what threatens to tear them apart from within. If people aren’t directly involved with it, odds are Jemisin will leave it to your imagination.
writing  creativity  fiction  cities  books 
13 days ago by allaboutgeorge
Read Jeff Tweedy from Wilco's New Let's Go (So We Can Get Back) Book Excerpt
The trick I was trying to teach myself at the time was how to find a balance between leaving enough room for someone to pour themselves into a song and giving them something concrete and engaging enough to want to be intimately collaborating with you on meaning.
songwriting  art  writing  creativity  books  rock  music 
4 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
The Proposal's Jasmine Guillory on How to Write Consent - The Atlantic
“There are so many hard things going on. [But] reading romances about women of color finding joy and finding love is just something so affirming to me and something that I need to read,” she said. “Because all day you’re looking at the news or you’re on Twitter and you’re seeing all of the bad things that are happening to women out there, and I just need to see men treating women well in a book, you know?”

“Women who have their voices heard and have joy and love and agency—that's the thing I really love about romance.”
writing  books  writers  love  relationships  power  gender  race 
6 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
How Stacey Abrams turned heartbreak into a side hustle as a romance novelist - The Washington Post
Leadership requires the ability to engage and to create empathy for communities with disparate needs and ideas. Telling an effective story — especially in romantic suspense — demands a similar skill set. Effective storytelling takes the reader into a life that is both familiar and foreign, enough of both to make space for others to feel empowered to tell their stories.
storytelling  story  writing  politics  language  leadership  novels  books  love  georgia 
7 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Kiese Laymon and Casey Gerald Confront American Success - The Atlantic
“It ain’t about making white folk feel what you feel,” she told him—advice that Gerald’s Granny seems to have lived by too. “It’s about not feeling what they want you to feel. Do you hear me? You better know from whence you came and forget about those folk.” Unlike the American Memoir, our stories must be honest. That is how we get free.
memory  books  nonfiction  writing  race  usa  academia  family  identity  presence 
10 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
'High Fidelity' Sequel: Nick Hornby Reveals What Would Happen | Hollywood Reporter
The arts are the most elaborate and most precise social network ever invented, but if it's going to work properly, you have to get out of the house sometimes and show who you are and what you love. You have to go to shows and galleries and bookstores, you have to ask for what you want out loud. And this expression of taste must involve an impulse that, at its heart, is anti-democratic: Somewhere you have to believe that what you like is better than what all those other losers like.
arts  books  music  aesthetics  criticism  beauty  social  socialnetworking  culture 
11 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Paris Review - Robert Caro, The Art of Biography No. 5
I can't start writing a book until I've thought it through and can see it whole in my mind. So before I start writing, I boil the book down to three paragraphs, or two or one—that's when it comes into view. That process might take weeks. And then I turn those paragraphs into an outline of the whole book. That's what you see up here on my wall now—twenty-seven typewritten pages. That's the fifth volume. Then, with the whole book in mind, I go chapter by chapter. I sit down at the typewriter and type an outline of that chapter, let's say if it's a long chapter, seven pages—it's really the chapter in brief, without any of the supporting evidence. Then, each chapter gets a notebook, which I fill with all the materials I want to use—quotations and facts pulled from all of the research I’ve done.
research  history  interview  biography  books  writing  journalism  authors 
august 2018 by allaboutgeorge
The Atlantic: The Enduring Appeal of the ‘Fake Relationship’ Rom-Com
It’s thus hard to react with anything but genuine glee as the smitten Peter twirls Lara Jean around in the cafeteria, makes a sojourn all the way across town to get her favorite yogurt drink from the Korean grocery store, and writes her daily notes with an increasing sense of urgency. None of these acts officially breaks the rules that Lara Jean established for their false union, but that’s the point. Even in the face of self-imposed barriers, love—teenage or otherwise—finds a way to make itself known.
movies  film  story  love  teenagers  books  southkorea  asianamerican  relationships 
august 2018 by allaboutgeorge
The meaning of life, according to a spaceship | The Outline
I have a hard time accepting care, attention and love as good responses to these horrifying events. In the middle of disaster, what is caring other than false hope?
fiction  storytelling  science  scifi  books  love  relationships  life  space 
february 2018 by allaboutgeorge
A Conversation With Dave Eggers and Mokhtar Alkhanshali About 'The Monk of Mokha'
One day I walked into a specialty coffee shop and had a cup of naturally processed coffee from Ethiopia’s Yirgacheffe region. I tasted blueberries, honeysuckle, and it had a sweet lingering aftertaste. The barista spoke to me about where it was grown, the elevation, varietal, how it was processed — but most of all, how their direct relationship to these growers make it possible for the farmers to make more money and live a better life. That part of it really became my entry point into the world of coffee.
coffee  drinking  africa  food  farming  culture  writing  nonfiction  books 
february 2018 by allaboutgeorge
Harry Potter 20th anniversary: Why Hufflepuff is the best house — Quartz
When a battle comes to Hogwarts in the final book of the series, she explains, Hufflepuffs stay and fight not because they want glory or attention, but because they want to do what’s right. “They didn’t want to show off, they weren’t being reckless,” she says. “That’s the essence of the Hufflepuff house.”
books  novels  reading  ethics  behavior  identity 
june 2017 by allaboutgeorge
Heyday — ABC Oakland
A is for Aviary, a home for the birds; B is for Broadway, from College to Third. C is for Cranes standing tall in the sky; D is for Dogs, wagging tails, saying “hi!”
Oakland  books  children  reading  sanfrancisco 
june 2017 by allaboutgeorge
Path — George Kelly
A reader of Mary Roach's "Gulp" enjoys a mention [pic] —
Oakland  books  from twitter
august 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Pynchon Takes On Silicon Alley - NYTimes.com
Mr. Pynchon, the secretive and widely followed author, is set to publish a new book titled “Bleeding Edge” that has Manhattan’s Silicon Alley as its setting, the publisher, Penguin Press, announced on Monday. The release date is Sept. 17.

The novel, set in 2001, takes place in “the lull between the collapse of the dot-com boom and the terrible events of September 11,” Penguin said in a release announcing its 2012 results.
nyc  technology  novels  writing  books  fiction  publishing  september11 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
George @ Barnes & Noble
Noticed under noteworthy non-fiction (@ Barnes & Noble) [pic]:
books  from twitter
december 2012 by allaboutgeorge
The Art of Fielding : NPR
Huh: "Now that he'd seen that kind of talent up close, he couldn't let it walk away."
novels  baseball  books  from twitter
december 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Black-Owned Beauty Shops Groom Political Activism : NPR
"So what exactly did beauticians do in the service of the movement or to support the movement?"
books  from twitter
december 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness? — By Touré — Book Review - NYTimes.com
"With so many ways of performing blackness, there is now no consensus about what it is or should be." h/t
books  from twitter
september 2011 by allaboutgeorge
New author Clemons sees no end for the E Street Band < PopMatters
"It's sad to see these old buildings go because they have so many memories, and it's a real personal kind of thing when you play these places. It's part of our history just gone.
"But we're just creating new history in new places."
obituaries  books  biography  music  rock  philadelphia 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
On Asian Parenting: 'Level Up' Seeks Middle Ground | Oakland, Berkeley & Bay Area Culture | Rachel Swan
Writing Level Up was Yang's way of sorting through some of these thoughts, and suffice it to say that the moral of the story is not that teenagers who love video games should pursue that obsession at the expense of everything else in their lives. But it also isn't that young people should subsume their will wholly to whatever life their parents have imagined for them. Yang is happy to occupy a more ambiguous middle ground, both in the fictional coming-of-age stories he writes as well as in his own life:

"I think this is true for both Thien and me, that in a lot of ways, even though we are both pursuing the arts, I think we want to do it in a much more thoughtful and practical way than maybe we see in some of our peers."
children  parenting  asian  asianamerican  books 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Spaces Between Stars: The secret connection between crime fiction and science fiction
Science fiction and crime fiction contextualised, explored and reported on rapidly changing and expanding modern conditions.  And they did it in ways that spoke to the felt experiences of our lives, to our hopes and our fears, in ways that other fictions, or even other reportage, couldn't approach.  Science fiction and crime fiction explained to us where we really are, and where we might be going.
fiction  writing  sciencefiction  crime  books 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Be f*****g nice to each other
‘Flink’ is the Danish word for ‘nice’, and as the son of an American father and Danish mother, Pedersen thinks he understands what the concept is all about.

‘Year after year Danes are rated as the happiest people in the world,’ he writes in the book. ‘But try standing in the supermarket queue on a Monday afternoon or driving during rush hour traffic. Danes can be some of the least tolerant people around.’
behavior  denmark  books  ethics  happiness  psychology 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Japan crises echo its pop culture disaster narratives - latimes.com
"That's sort of the key to understanding what's going on in Japan," LaMarre said, "this kind of sense that obviously you want to be bailed out, you want to be rebuilt, you want things reconstructed. But at the same time there's a desire for a definite break with the past.... And as we all know, Japan's been having a lot of economic problems for a long time, and there's growing problems with immigration, unemployment, aging. And so there's a strange sense of not knowing whether to want things to go back to the way they were or to really have change through these catastrophes."
japan  disaster  tsunami  earthquake  culture  books  movies 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Rob Sheffield's Eighties Odyssey | Rolling Stone Music
That pretty much sums up the Eighties to me, and I think that's why people still gravitate towards that period, when people were so open-eared and experimental. It's a sense that these boundaries had been crashed down by artists like Michael Jackson or Duran Duran or Grandmaster Flash. There was a sense that rock could be influenced by disco and hip-hop could be influenced by pop. There was this really kind of glorious moment where every station that was playing the Human League and the Clash was also playing the Pointer Sisters and Marvin Gaye. I thought that was going to be the future from now on.
music  1980s  radio  pop  rock  books  nonfiction 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
When a love for art turns into lust - Sex News, Sex Talk - Salon.com
Romanticizing the act of writing or any other art is not very helpful to the artist or the art. It's much better if one simply does. It worked better for me when I was just a writer, a working person. I've never felt that I needed a special desk with a special light coming in from the window at a special angle. It's work, not so different from that way you fix dinner or you pick up a child at school.
writing  sex  men  women  art  creativity  books  memoir  story  business 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Book Review - Harlem Is Nowhere - By Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts - NYTimes.com
“This is the evidence of an unnatural history–it was not always this way, it came to be that way for a reason.”
books  from twitter
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Francis Fukuyama’s New History of Human Social Structures - NYTimes.com
Much of what I read here reminded me strongly of Kim Stanley Campbell's "The Years of Rice and Salt."
books  nonfiction  science  behavior  power  culture  research 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Francis Fukuyama’s New History of Human Social Structures - NYTimes.com
“My argument is that the rule of law comes out of organized religion, and that democracy is a weird accident of history,” he said. “Parliaments in Europe had legal rights, and it was a complete historical accident that the English Parliament could fight a civil war and produce a constitutional settlement that became the basis of modern democracy.”
democracy  history  politics  power  europe  books  nonfiction  behavior 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
High on the Stones by Dan Chiasson | The New York Review of Books
I am not making an original point, but it cannot be reiterated enough: the experience of making and taking in culture is now, for the first time in human history, a condition of almost paralyzing overabundance. For millennia it was a condition of scarcity; and all the ways we regard things we want but cannot have, in those faraway days, stood between people and the art or music they needed to have: yearning, craving, imagining the absent object so fully that when the real thing appears in your hands, it almost doesn’t match up. Nobody will ever again experience what Keith Richards and Mick Jagger experienced in Dartford, scrounging for blues records. The Rolling Stones do not happen in any other context: they were a band based on craving, impersonation, tribute: white guys from England who worshiped black blues and later, to a lesser extent, country, reggae, disco, and rap.
culture  culturalstudies  memoir  writing  nonfiction  books  music  rock  blues  youtube  social 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Two books on blacks and the White House
"The symbolic removal of 'whites only' from the White House has been a long time coming."
reviews  books  from twitter
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Stefan Kanfer's Tough Without a Gun: What made Humphrey Bogart so great? - By Tom Shone - Slate Magazine
What lends singularity to Bogart's films is the sense of irreversible actions, with moral consequences, being borne by a man standing as if waist-high in a river, braced by events. The action held him in place. Once things happened to him, they didn't un-happen. He didn't get a do-over. When he got slugged, he rubbed his jaw like a kid coming away from the dentist. "When he sweated you could have wrung his shirt," said François Truffaut, doubtless thinking of the first scene The Big Sleep, in which Marlowe comes across Major Sternwood in his hothouse, living off heat like a newborn spider, surrounded by orchids whose flesh so reminds him of the rotten sweetness of corruption.

"Why did you have to go on?" Lauren Bacall asks him.
"Too many people told me to stop," he replies.
hollywood  identity  acting  movies  film  cinema  books  fiction 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Top Ten Must-Read Books for White Parents of Black Children | BlogHer
"As with most parenting questions, I think there are just about as many answers as there are families."
books  from twitter
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The decline of a legend | StarTribune.com
"I did not understand how this place had existed as haven and ghetto."
Harlem  books  from twitter
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Why the Kindle Is Losing Me, by Sarah Lacy - Techcrunch
Technology is about adding features and functionality to a thing that was limited before– not taking them away. The only way the Kindle survives in an iPad world is by appealing to hardcore readers and students. Amazon needs to fix this now.
education  kindle  books  ipad  reading  attention  behavior 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
I, Reader by Alexander Chee - The Morning News
The world remains beautiful and terrible at the same time, and either way, I know it doesn’t care what I think or feel about it. There are things to do to help others, and there are things that may never change. But if I learned anything from all of this, it’s my first, oldest lesson as a reader: There is always going to be a book that saves you. There is also a new lesson: You do not know how it will get to you.
writing  attention  books  culture  behavior  fiction  ipad  kindle  reading  nonfiction  relationships 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Chalmers Johnson, author of Blowback; The Sorrows of Empire, Dead at 79 | CommonDreams.org
In one of my fondest memories of Chalmers and Sheila Johnson at their home with their then Russian blue cats, MITI and MOF, named after the two engines of Japan's political economy -- Chal railed against the journal, Foreign Affairs, which he saw as a clap trap of statist conventionalism. He decided he had had enough of the journal and of the organization that published it, the Council on Foreign Relations. So, Chalmers called the CFR and told the young lady on the phone to cancel his membership.

The lady said, "Professor Johnson, I'm sorry sir. No one cancels their membership in the Council in Foreign Relations. Membership is for life. People are canceled when they die."

Chalmers Johnson, not missing a beat, said "Consider me dead."
foreign  empire  military  economy  japan  news  politics  power  geography  books  nonfiction  obituaries 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Pitchfork: Why We Fight: Why We Fight #8
We can probably spend a minute thinking about all the things that might be lost without the model of the album as a coherent statement-- the same way we can worry about what happens if people rarely sit down for deep, focused engagement with something like a book. But you can't really deny that this ongoing-stream version of following music is a good match for how people experience life and consume information. It's actually the same vantage on pop music that's always been held-- by radio listeners, party regulars, mixtape shoppers, pop-chart followers, folks everywhere. Packets and bursts and narratives.
business  celebrity  hiphop  music  pop  attention  story  radio  life  information  books  presence 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Imagine if Mick Jagger responded to Keith Richards about his new autobiography. - By Bill Wyman - Slate Magazine
It's about rock 'n' roll, of course, and playing guitar, and his tenure, and mine, in our unusual coalition. It's also about heroin and everything else he can't stop ingesting. But again it's about Keith himself, who once started never did stop—through the fame, the songs, the concerts and the women and the drugs; and the violence and senselessness, the addictions and the deaths, the ruined lives, the petty and large-scale cruelties. At the end Keith got Wayne Shorter to do a sax solo that is itself almost an out-of-body experience, perhaps the loveliest moment on one of our records. It goes on and on over the last two minutes of a very long track, and the end is almost a … an exaltation, perhaps? I am lost there. It's something I'm not sure I ever saw evidenced in real life, and something that isn't in his book. It's the sound—or at least the closest thing Keith Richards will ever admit to it—of a conscience.
music  books  humor  life  rock 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
James T. Kloppenberg Discusses His ‘Reading Obama’ - NYTimes.com
“To critics on the left he seems a tragic failure, a man with so much potential who has not fulfilled the promise of change that partisans predicted for his presidency,. To the right he is a frightening success, a man who has transformed the federal government and ruined the economy.”
obama  politics  books  philosophy  reading  power  nonfiction 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The 'Disintegration' Of America's Black Neighborhoods : NPR
"'Well, these people think so much of themselves, and they've moved away to their fancy places.'"
books  from twitter
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Max Eternity: Beauty Is Goodness: Deborah Willis on African-American Imagery 1890's to the Present
"I believe my response to beauty is in the experiences that people have. I'm not defining it. I'm reflecting."
books  from twitter
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The new preppy has nothing to do with tennis and Lacoste - latimes.com
Perhaps preppiness is less about demographics and style than it is about living decently in an often indecent world. As stuffy and elitist as its preoccupations can be, preppiness at its core is ultimately about self-respect. It's about pulling your pants up. It's about being able to come up with an acceptable answer when asked what book changed your life. It's about knowing that you don't necessarily need to have money to have class.

And what better time to be reminded of all this than now?
identity  power  class  aesthetics  money  behavior  books 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Books of The Times - ‘Skippy Dies’ by Paul Murray - NYTimes.com
“Maybe instead of strings it’s stories things are made of, an infinite number of tiny vibrating stories; once upon a time they all were part of one big giant superstory, except it got broken up into a jillion different pieces, that’s why no story on its own makes any sense, and so what you have to do in a life is try and weave it back together, my story into your story, our stories into all the other people’s we know, until you’ve got something that to God or whoever might look like a letter or even a whole word....”
story  books  fiction  time  ireland  attention  beauty  physics 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Book review: 'Bob Dylan in America' by Sean Wilentz - latimes.com
"Although reminiscent of the modernists' collages," Wilentz writes, "Dylan's method aimed not simply at allusion but at something very different, essential to his recent work — more emphatic, at times risky dissolution of distinctions between past and present, as well as between high and low, scholarly and popular, exotic and familiar, moving between and among them as if it required no effort."
books  bobdylan  nonfiction  criticism  music  1960s  history  art  creativity 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
James Franco Fiction - Just Before the Black by James Franco - Esquire
I sit in the driver's seat of my grandfather's old DeVille. It is night out and cool. Me and Joe, we just sit.

We're out in front of the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course pro shop. It's a tan building with white trim. It's where Joe and I work during the day.

We sit here because it's dark here, and there are no lights outside this building. We're stopped for no reason except that the night is still going and we're drunk, and who wants to go home, ever, and this spot is as good as any to just sit in the shadows and let life slow.

My window is cracked, just a bit, and the air plays on my forehead like a cold whisper.
books  fiction  literature  writing  story  toread 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Music Is Science Fiction: An Interview With The Lisps | Lightspeed Magazine
Over the past two weeks, I’ve exchanged several e-mails with The Lisps. In the interview that follows, we touch on topics such as self-help songs, The Difference Engine, string theory, and, of course, The Singularity.
music  songwriting  sciencefiction  writing  creativity  art  indie  rock  literature  books  science 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Mapping out alternative universes for Texas
What if we had made Cuba a state in 1902? A major Cold War near-catastrophe could have been averted, but would the United States have had to put down a socialist uprising in the late 1950s anyway?

What if water-rich northernmost California had split off to become Shasta in 1957 and got rich selling water to what was left of California? Humboldt County suddenly has a lot more money and power.

What if Brigham Young had gotten his wish for a state called Deseret, which would have encompassed modern-day Utah, nearly all of Nevada, most of Arizona, a hunk of New Mexico and the part of California that includes San Diego? Hard to see polygamy dying without a serious fight in a state that large.
geography  usa  politics  history  mapping  power  books  fiction  texas  california  cuba  time 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Listening to Van Morrison by Greil Marcus | Books | The Guardian
"How," he said, "can you write about Morrison's music without taking into account what a completely unpleasant person he is?"

I never know how to answer that kind of question, because it represents a whole way of being in the world that's foreign to me. I don't believe that a person's life necessarily has anything to do with what he or she creates, whether the person in question is a musician, a painter, an accountant, an engineer, a designer or a cleaner. A person's work is not reducible to his or her neuroses, and a person's neuroses are not the determinant of a person's work. In the act, the work can take over; it can produce its own momentum, its own imperatives, its own yarragh. It can create its own necessity, its own insistence that, in the act, the world conform to the demands the work is making on it. "I don't know that Van Morrison is a completely unpleasant person," I said. "But I don't really care. I don't see what one thing has to do with the other."
music  psychology  uk  rock  books  criticism  1960s  1970s  beauty  art 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Journalists Who Write Novels - Moving From Newswriting to Fiction
"When a you're a reporter you're writing about the facts of the situation, about very specific incidents, and it doesn't go beyond that," he says. "When you're writing fiction it's all about meaning and how things feel to your characters.

"You have to get out of your own point of view. In a story, don't think about how you would respond to a certain situation; think about how your characters would respond."
journalism  creativity  fiction  writing  books  news 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
"For Better": The science of marital unhappiness - Nonfiction - Salon.com
It's not that if you have a bad memory of your first date that you're headed for divorce, but I think it's a useful tool to listen to yourself and your partner, and when you start to hear the negativity creep in, it's a red flag.

I was in marriage counseling at one point and the counselor wanted to hear about our first date, and I thought it was a ridiculous question. I thought we needed to talk about what's happening now, not what happened 20 years ago. And I wish she had stopped to explain that it does matter. Later, I would tell the exact same story and there would be a few little negative fingers in there. There's a big difference between saying, "We got horribly lost on our first date," and, "Of course, you didn't stop to ask for directions." It's the same first date but by the time he's being accused of not getting directions, you can tell that the relationship is going south. You can see that the structure of the relationship has changed.
marriage  relationships  love  science  research  books  nytimes  memory  story 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Illustrations for I-Hotel Book | lelandwong on Xanga
It's semi-fiction about the decade from 1967 to 1977 and the Asian American community. The book consists of ten novellas which has one of my illustrations at the beginning of each.

I used a technique that I never formally used before and that was with a Chinese brush and Chinese ink. Then going back in there with a wash to get the middle tones. I did some photoshopping on the images afterwards.
books  asian  asianamerican  sanfrancisco  novel  fiction  drawing  creativity  art  ethnicity  california 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Bringing vampires back home? | Reuters
"The new breed of vampires are far from monstrous, they are glamorous and sexy and have an emotional side," she said. "Their (teenagers') attraction to vampire figures provides a safe way for them to acknowledge these desires."
movies  books  fiction  creativity  sex  power  conferences 
april 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Brava Theater: The Beebo Brinker Chronicles
Adapted from Ann Bannon's groundbreaking, award-winning pulp novels of the 1950s and 1960s, Beebo Brinker Chronicles follows the lives and loves of four friends in pre-Stonewall Greenwich Village. Beth and Laura, secret lovers in college, still pine for each other. Before they can reunite, they find themselves entangled in a web spun by Beebo Brinker, a butch denizen of the underground bar scene, and Jack, a flamboyant fop with caustic wit.
theater  gay  sanfrancisco  drama  books 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Summer reading - Page 3 - Salon.com
Forty years on, readers can look back at a plot trajectory -- boy meets girl; girl meets bad girl; girl meets good girl; girl meets closeted-superstar girl; girl finds true love -- that melds mistaken identities and molten love scenes, via melodramatic prose, into a satisfying whole.
books  fiction  gay 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Michael Chabon: Bonus Track 2: "Sailing By Ear"
The sound quality is probably still not anything close to what I used to get from the vinyl copy of Fragile that I picked up a couple of weeks after Bill took me shopping. And it’s definitely not everything that I need. Nothing is. That’s part of rock and roll, too, I suppose, and something that Bill and my mother and I all understood that day, without understanding it. And like Nemo at my keyboard, I will sail on, through 20,000 leagues or pages, chasing that mystery, and all the others that I can hear, once again, in the music.
music  writing  identity  aging  songwriting  beauty  books  parenting  technology 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Douglas Coupland: 'Generation A' loneliness
"Storytelling is ultimately a creative act of pattern recognition," Coupland says. "Through characters, plot and setting, a writer creates places where previously invisible truths become visible. Or the storyteller posits a series of dots that the reader can connect. In times of information upheaval like right now, the attempt to locate patterns is one of the few ways to survive and not be dragged into the churn."
story  books  fiction  sciencefiction  futurism  writing 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Powell's Books - PowellsBooks.BLOG - On Storytelling: The Powells.com Interview with Donald Miller
You can't tell a good story without conflict — the story can't be beautiful or meaningful. We're taught to run from conflict, and it's robbing us of some really good stories.
story  beauty  plot  writing  creativity  war  books  life 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Finding self in another culture - Sacramento Living - Sacramento Food and Wine, Home, Health | Sacramento Bee
"When an Indian American writer portrays India, a reader will already have seen five other portrayals in other books and inject what they've seen before," she explained. "That leads readers to overlook other aspects of an immigrant experience."
india  writing  fiction  literature  books  sacramento  identity  culture 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The key to his genius - Books, Canada - Macleans.ca
One can speculate endlessly about the causes of Gould’s late-career breakdown; everything from the recent death of his perfectionist mother to the routine pressures of middle age has been cited. And it is surely the case that his hypochondria, combined with the cycles of self-medication, anxiety, and (importantly) the means to indulge these, created its own toxic energy. But I think the simplest explanation is both the best and the most frightening. Gould was caught in a control freak’s nightmare. Even as he struggled to fix something he felt was broken, he was attacked by new waves of misgiving about whether the steps he was taking to solution were actually making the problem worse. Not only was his playing stalled by thought—in other words, he had become the centipede—but, far worse, the thought itself had become stalled, recursive and self-negating at every moment. This is the energy of consciousness bent back upon its bearer.
music  philosophy  behavior  thinking  health  psychology  classical  classicalmusic  canada  books 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
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