allaboutgeorge + attention   233

The Economics Of Getting Heard: Guest Op-Ed | Billboard
When choice is unlimited, the authentic and the intangible become most valuable. Putting out a great record is the required start, but building and maintaining the conversation is -- more than ever before -- paramount to getting your music heard.
music  economics  attention 
5 days ago by allaboutgeorge
'Blade Runner 2049': Why some science fiction writers are tired of dystopias - CSMonitor.com
“The utility dystopian fiction used to serve was to bring problems to our attention and seek solutions. But the danger is that these stories can become a collective act of despair in response to current events.”
story  fiction  movies  attention  aesthetics  sciencefiction  scifi 
5 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
the fear is necessary
People who read a lot of internet news might feel like they're in danger; people living in these areas actually live and experience daily danger. But just as Trump isn't concerned about facts, he's not concerned about that experience. The fear is necessary; it, along with the refusal to believe that the world has and will continue to change, is his power source. Eliminate it, and there'd be no need for him. 
journalism  attention  power  internet  media  politics 
8 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Richard Hell Interview - Richard Hell Very Clean Tramp Book Autobiography - Esquire
When you're young, you don't especially think of yourself as being young. You're just alive and everything's interesting and you don't think of things in terms of age because you're not conscious of it. But then you hit your 40s and you realize, well, you're still alive but you're not young anymore. And things start taking a different kind of aspect. And you start getting curious about what it all adds up to. What does it mean to outlive your youth? I wanted to hold my life in my hands and turn it around and look at it in different ways to figure out what the hell had happened, to see if I could put it outside of myself and make it into a material object that I could grasp. So that was part of it. And the other part was I like writing books.
aging  punk  music  rock  writing  biography  nonfiction  history  attention 
march 2013 by allaboutgeorge
On Keeping a Notebook in the Digital Age — Architecting A Life — Medium
If I go back through my ersatz spark file now, each note triggers the memory of something I was thinking at the time, but the fragments look disjointed and nonsensical. It’s a text that is, per Didion, meaningful only to me.
digital  memory  writing  attention  data  information 
march 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Snapchat and the Erasable Future of Social Media - Businessweek
“Unarchived communication is our most primal form of communication,” she says. “It’s natural for us to go back to it for things like communicating with our friends and family, and not having to think about the fact that the Internet is forever. Ephemeral data is the future.”
twitter  facebook  privacy  photography  mobile  memory  law  presence  reputation  attention 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Sepia Mutiny’s Closure Is a Reminder: Blogging While Brown Ain’t Easy - COLORLINES
For Mukhopadhyay, the shift in blogging culture signals a lack of infrastructure for people who want to talk about important issues in ways that don’t generate income. She suggests a progressive startup plan that’s funded by big non-profits and advocacy groups whose campaigns are often supported by bloggers and that can generate income. “The larger activist community needs to come together to figure out how to support our voices, since they matter.”
blogging  race  ethnicity  attention  social  socialmedia  media  journalism 
april 2012 by allaboutgeorge
Pretentious? It's a compliment - Telegraph
I'm interested in trying to demystify as many things as possible. There's a prejudice against this in the arts community, the idea that if you poke around too much you'll burst the balloon and all the magic will be gone. My feeling is that if you can make the magic disappear, you should. It'll appear somewhere else - you can't get rid of it.
"So when I'm working I'm always alternating between two frames of mind, and they are quite different. One is the delighted child wandering around gasping with pleasure, and the second one is the reflective person saying, 'Why am I excited by that?'
"I don't just want to be the reactive child, which was so much the history of early rock'n'roll. It was so frightened of losing that feeling of delight and wonder that it just looked the other way when it came to adulthood."
attention  uk  writing  thinking 
july 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Millions : Embracing The Other I Am; or, How Walt Whitman Saved My Life
This is why Walt Whitman, or you, or I can cock our hats as we please indoors or out, because no matter who we are, we are just as good and just as necessary as everyone else. But for me it also offered a route out of my endless, self-constructed maze of Self. If there is no wall between I and you, if we are all one and the same, what’s the point of hiding one from the other? Why not acknowledge that part of myself that wanted to die? Why not tell someone that while I never wanted to drink again, I was afraid I might lose my mind if I didn’t? Why not tell my parents I wasn’t the perfect son I wanted them to think I was? Why not sit in a church basement full of strangers, as I did once toward the end of that summer, crying like a baby because a woman had left me and I couldn’t blame her? Why not, if only for this one day, dare to be fully and completely alive?
poetry  literature  behavior  fiction  attention 
july 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Everything is a Remix Part 3 | Everything Is a Remix
For instance, all artists spend their formative years producing derivative work.

Bob Dylan’s first album contained eleven cover songs.

Richard Pryor began his stand-up career doing a not-very-good imitation of Bill Cosby.

And Hunter S. Thompson re-typed The Great Gatsby just to get the feel of writing a great novel.

Nobody starts out original. We need copying to build a foundation of knowledge and understanding. And after that… things can get interesting.

After we’ve grounded ourselves in the fundamentals through copying, it’s then possible to create something new through transformation. Taking an idea and creating variations. This is time-consuming tinkering but it can eventually produce a breakthrough.
attention  curation  music  art  creativity 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Gay Talese: What I Read - Business - The Atlantic Wire
There's only so much you can devote in any one day to reading. But you must read. That's why I feel I must read the newspapers first. Why? Because I really want to know what is going on. But I don't have more than one main paper that I can rely upon, and that is The Times. That is the paper of record and the paper of significance. It does the best job of any paper in the whole world of covering the world. And of covering the world of the artist, and of covering the world of the athlete, and of covering the world of the interior decorator, and the statesman, and the politician, and the politician that sends pictures of himself nude to some women who don't even know him. These worlds are reflected everyday by the writers and columnists, and shaped by editors who are top analyzers of the news.
newspapers  reading  attention  writing  journalism  media 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Shrinking of the Non-Social Web - Ben Elowitz - Voices - AllThingsD
When you exclude just Facebook from the rest of the Web, consumption in terms of minutes of use shrank by nearly nine percent between March 2010 and March 2011, according to data from comScore. And, even when you include Facebook usage, total non-mobile Internet consumption still dropped three percent over the same period.

We’ve known that social is growing lightning fast — notably, Facebook consumption, which grew by 69 percent — but now it’s clear that Facebook is not growing in addition to the Web. Rather, it’s actually taking consumption away from the publishers who compete on the rest of the Web.

And just what is the rest of the Web?

I have been calling it the “document Web,” based on how Google and other Web architectures view its pages as documents, linked together. But increasingly, it might as well be called the “searchable Web” since it’s accessed predominantly as a reference, and navigated primarily via search.
data  information  search  web  technology  facebook  social  business  attention  blogging  twitter 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Rise and Inglorious Fall of Myspace - BusinessWeek
"The thing about user adoption and user departure is that it's not a steady flow," says Boyd. "Think of it as, you're knitting a beautiful scarf, and you're knitting and knitting, and you get a bigger and bigger scarf. Then someone pulls a loose thread at the bottom. And it all unravels."
myspace  social  technology  attention  business 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and the Terrifying Truth About New Technology - WSJ.com
I'm not saying you have to keep up. But at the moment you choose to stop growing, your world will begin to shrink. You'll be able to communicate with fewer people, especially the young. You will only see reruns. You will not understand how to pay for things. The outside world will become a frightening and unpredictable place.
As they say, the only constant is change.
Each new generation builds on the work of the previous one, gaining new perspective. New verbs are introduced. We Google strange and dangerous places. We tweet mindlessly to the cosmos. We Facebook our own grandmothers.

I, for one, don't want to be left behind.
social  technology  internet  psychology  culture  innovation  attention  youth  twitter  foursquare  aging  memory  future 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Jason Calacanis: "Blogging Is Dead" & Why "Stupid People Shouldn't Write"
"The concept of journalism is going away," Calacanis said. "It is not enough to be a writer. You need to be a writer and an expert."

Calacanis brings up the idea of local news as something that people do not care about. In that vein, he thinks that AOL local news effort Patch, which the company has poured millions of dollars into, will ultimately fail. Instead of just the news of a local McDonalds being built, people want how much that new franchise will cost, what benefit it will have for the local economy etc.

"People bring up the edge case of the local town meeting," Calacanis said. "Who gives a f***l? Nobody cares anymore."
news  hyperlocal  journalism  media  newspapers  patch  business  attention 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Looking for a 'Hangover' cure
Here's how it might work: Get together a group of smart, influential tastemakers -- journalists, critics, student leaders, bloggers. Have them select five indie Asian American creators -- writers, filmmakers, musicians -- from an open call that includes anyone with a brand-new, brashly different and commercially viable product.

Send these creators on a collective national barnstorming tour of the college campuses with the biggest Asian American student representation -- reading, performing, speaking, and showing their work and their potential. The costs of the tour would be covered by student organization funds and corporate sponsors.

Here's the kicker: Although attendance at these events would be free, every attendee would have to purchase one of the five products these artists are promoting on the spot, while enrolling in an online community that gives the artists long-term engagement with their consumers.
film  movies  art  culture  asian  asianamerican  race  ethnicity  attention  creativity 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
How to De-Crapify Your Home: A Start-to-Finish Guide - Lifehacker
We're not talking about going ultra-minimalist here, but rather making a concentrated effort to only keep the things in your life that you use and actually matter to you. To do this, we're first going to take a look at identifying the crap in your home, then how to get rid of it so you're not always just throwing it away, and finally discuss some methods for actually maintaining your crap-free lifestyle. Let's get to it.
diy  howto  gtd  Home  work  attention 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Why The New York Times replaced its Twitter ‘cyborg’ with people this week | Poynter.
“The metrics went up considerably and almost immediately after switching from automated to personal. We’ve seen the same effect with several other accounts.”

“What we’ve seen by measuring it closely,” he said, “is that human-powered feeds do much, much better than automated ones, by any relevant metric.”
twitter  social  technology  media  journalism  newspapers  attention  audience  communication  online  presence  reputation 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
How Drudge "stays on top"? Pandering on race, right-wing paranoia | Philly | 05/16/2011
We should by all means talk about Matt Drudge, but we need to be honest about who he is, who he influences and how -- and that is a far uglier picture that the one that New York Times readers got today. Of all the exaggerated, half-bogus story lines that have been spun on the Drudge Report, none has been more successful or more enduring than the legend of Matt Drudge himself.
journalism  media  race  bigotry  politics  bias  online  attention  research 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
On the Floor Laughing: Traders Are Having a New Kind of Fun - James Somers - Technology - The Atlantic
The trick seems to be that games are constrained in a way that the real world isn't: there is a board, field, pitch, court, area, table, ring or other enclosure that bounds the action in space; clocks that bound it in time; and rules that restrict the space of allowable moves.

In some ways those constraints are what make games mentally satisfying, because they relieve us of what existentialists called "the anxiety of freedom." By giving us obvious, well-defined goals, they save us from having to define success; and with points, leaderboards, heads-up displays, indicators, badges, etc., they tell us exactly when we've achieved it.

[...] It's a lot harder to say whether you "have a healthy romantic relationship" or "are making a lasting contribution to something bigger than yourself" than that you've "lined up the yellow gemstones," "scored more points than the other team in twenty minutes," or "collected forty pounds of silver."
games  attention  technology  money  business  power  work 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Real time, All the time: Why every news organisation has to be live « Emily Bell(wether)
Live is not ‘yet another thing’ for a working journalist to understand , it is the great journalistic challenge of our time. The skill involved in providing real time valuable information for audiences around stories as they happen is crucial to being a credible journalist and a resilient news organisation. For those who question whether this kind of journalism can be valuable or high quality, there are three examples I can immediately think of to show them which rebuts the idea (if anybody realy still holds it)  that working in real time degrades good journalism.
journalism  technology  attention  reputation  news  media  social 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Baltimore band Wye Oak: Juggling loneliness and aloneness on their new 'Civilian' | Pop & Hiss | Los Angeles Times
“I used to keep a journal," she said, “but I would always forget to carry it around, and my ideas come when I’m out and about. My iPhone, though, is the one thing I have on my person at all times. So when I think of a guitar part or a vocal line or some lyrics, I put them on my iPhone. That way, when I have time to work on songs, I don’t face that blank-page syndrome like I used to. I played back that guitar riff and started singing scat syllables over it.
songwriting  art  iphone  mobile  memory  attention  creativity  technology 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Can Delicious Solve Our Information Discovery Problem?: Tech News and Analysis «
But think about the vast amount of content that has already been sucked in by Delicious over the years — arguably the single biggest asset that the company has, and the one Hurley and Chen were likely willing to pay up for. Those millions of shared bookmarks are a kind of social graph of content in a way: they are implicit signals from all the people who shared those links, or stored them for later, that there is valuable content there. Some of those links may be dead or changed, but it’s still a fairly substantial foundation for an information-discovery service to build on.
social  information  toread  yahoo  socialmedia  search  data  attention  youtube 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Pitchfork: Poptimist: Poptimist #38
Music's digital availability means we're currently in a happy position where our distance from the Milton Point is utterly apparent: the past is too big for anyone to get much of a handle on it. It's easy to think of history-- of pop or anything else-- as a kind of map, whose final bits of terra incognita are now being glumly filled in. But there's a better way of thinking about history-- as a network, scaling up in complexity as more and more nodes are added and more pieces of information link to one another.
music  criticism  writing  history  attention  mapping  technology 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Mindfulness - Fully experiencing the present: a practice for everyone, religious or not - Page 2 - Los Angeles Times
"It's about people waking up, not being confined by any belief system. Awareness is bigger than a belief system."
attention  spirituality  religion  buddhism  research  health  behavior 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
A Colorful Weekend
Whereas apps like Instagram, Picplz, and Path are great for sharing one-off photos, that’s not what Color is doing. Their specialty is the ability to rapidly document an event with multiple pictures (and short videos) from multiple perspectives. The result is actually quite fascinating when it all comes together. You get a sorta living, breathing photo album for an event.

Some of the photos are good, but many of them are mediocre to bad. But it doesn’t matter. It’s about the album as a whole, not a single picture.
location  social  photography  video  journalism  attention  technology  business  travel  documentary 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Unlit Social Graph - TNW Location
Ubiquitous smartphones and always on access to umbrella social graphs are suddenly making these sort of tools possible.

And the opportunity is far larger than pick-up basketball, or even sports.  Every school is a network, every employer is a network, every bar is a network, every office building is a network, every hobby is a network, every neighborhood is a network, and at an extreme level, every shared interest is a network, regardless of location.

This doesn’t even get at the disposable, or elastic networks as discussed by companies like Nearverse and Color – people that happen to just be nearby each other for a snapshot of time.

All of these networks share two common characteristics.  1) They are not yet graphed in a mainstream way by Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Jive, or any other dominant, online social service; and 2) They are all mappable with a smartphone.
mobile  location  social  work  attention  socialnetworking  behavior  data  information 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Bank of Facebook: Currency, Identity, Reputation « emergent by design
Money is a tool we use for arms-length transactions, where there isn’t an assumption of any kind of relationship or trust between parties. But as data is being mapped at an accelerating rate – from self-quantifiation, to the contextual and relational data about our location and interactions, to our preferences and opinions, to our exchanges and transactions – we are being granted access to a much richer base of information in our decision-making toolkit.

What this means is that money isn’t the only kind of currency that can facilitate a transaction anymore. Trust networks are able to be tapped for recommendations and referrals, while predictive analysis algorhithms can suggest the kinds of people, products, services, or events that would resonate with our personalities or value set. A new set of filtering tools are emerging that are shaping where we direct our attention and resources, namely intentions and actions.
facebook  social  data  information  money  business  attention  reputation  behavior 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Decline, plateau, decline: New data on The Daily suggests a social media decline and a tough road ahead » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
Its activity on Twitter seems to match my own perceptions of how they’re doing — an early rush of excitement; a decline as people lost interest and the app struggled with technical problems; a plateau once the tech got sorted out; and then another decline once the app started charging users.

In the nearly two months we’re looking at, only 6,026 tweets were generated within The Daily app. But much more discouraging is the trend.
ipad  twitter  social  technology  tablet  mobile  attention  app  software 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
News innovation isn't just about writing code, it is about how we use that code to tell stories
Technical innovation in software is not about writing code from scratch. There is a huge body of prior art available that developers use to get their ideas to function.

And journalism has a huge body of prior art in story-telling techniques, in synthesising complex problems into something our audience can grasp quickly over breakfast, and in engaging our audiences and making them passionate about issues that affect their day-to-day lives. The innovative news organisations today are the ones constantly experimenting with new digital tools as new ways to source stories, address their audience, and engage with the public.
journalism  media  news  story  software  technology  engagement  attention  DFMchat 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
A VC: Curation
If you are building a marketplace or a social platform, make sure to build curation into your model. It will make the service easier for everyone to navigate, particularly new users.
attention  technology  social  mobile  business  reputation  curation 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Call it the Frank Rich Discount: The Sunday New York Times moves from premium product to loss leader — and the best deal for digital access » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
Want the digital bundle? Subscribe to the Sunday paper, get the digital bundle for (less than) free — but have the Sunday Times delivered to a local library instead of your house. Or a community center, or a nursing home. Or, if you’re feeling cheeky, maybe directly to a recycling center, or a Boy Scout camp for kindling? That moves the Frank Rich Discount from win-win to win-win-win.
library  newspapers  nytimes  media  journalism  attention  paywall  business 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Caterina.net» Blog Archive » FOMO and Social Media
FOMO —Fear of Missing Out— is a great motivator of human behavior, and I think a crucial key to understanding social software, and why it works the way it does. Many people have studied the game mechanics that keep people collecting things (points, trophies, check-ins, mayorships, kudos). Others have studied how the neurochemistry that keeps us checking Facebook every five minutes is similar to the neurochemistry fueling addiction. Social media has made us even more aware of the things we are missing out on. You’re home alone, but watching your friends status updates tell of a great party happening somewhere. You are aware of more parties than ever before. And, like gym memberships, adding Bergman movies to your Netflix queue and piling up unread copies of the New Yorker, watching these feeds gives you a sense that you’re participating, not missing out, even when you are.
attention  social  media  conferences  behavior  games  sxsw  facebook 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The 'gamification' of news, and how it can be relevant | Old Media, New Tricks
Imagine a reader using her smart phone to open your news app while she’s sitting at a coffee shop. Instead of just the latest, or even hand-picked top stories, appearing on the main page, what if it had a section that showed news that was relevant to the area around that coffee shop? What if the “game” were that users get points for reading the news about all sections of the city (as they travel and check your stories, a map fills in, showing they saw the latest news for that area)? The game mechanic added in could also just be to show which of their Facebook friends had read the same stories, at the same location. So when you log into the app at that coffee shop, it tells you that three of your friends read the news from your site from that same shop. Users could also leave comments on the story that are location-specific or just a tip about the coffee shop (which could be displayed next to your news organization’s review, which also could appear thanks to location tagging).
news  media  newspapers  information  data  journalism  social  location  games  attention  community  mapping  presence 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Google introduces search site blocking. Why not the reverse, too? | Knight Digital Media Center
“A tool like this could increase the Balkanization of a precious resource: attention. When you can choose your info-filter, you can filter out not just content farms, but ideological opponents, religious resources, and whoever’s content you’re boycotting this week or next."
information  attention  media  journalism  google  search  power  technology 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Errol Morris: Profiles
Quotidian lies, the little fabrications that make the commerce of daily life possible, if not always palatable, are laid on the surface by the speaker. A muted strain of implicit skepticism - the silent voice of the filmmaker - bubbles along just beneath that. Peripheral stuff turns out to matter. "I like the idea of making films about ostensibly absolutely nothing," Morris says. "I like the irrelevant, the tangential, the sidebar excursion to nowhere that suddenly becomes revelatory. That's what all my movies are about. That and the idea that we're in possession of certainty, truth, infallible knowledge, when actually we're just a bunch of apes running around. My films are about people who think they're connected to something, although they're really not."
film  cinema  story  newyorker  documentary  media  attention  presence 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Software Rants & Other Miscellany: Foursquare, Facebook, Founders, and Passion
The Passion Gap is evident when you see a founder or product manager so deeply engaged in their product that they can’t help but think about it all the time, and, as a result, they see all the fine details that are required to make a product that exactly matches what the market needs. This is true even when the market hasn’t yet realized the need.
business  beauty  social  foursquare  attention  identity  software  technology  location 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Richard J. Tofel: Someday, the sun will set on SEO — and the business of news will be better for it » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
[A]fter a decade of SEO, a lot of lowest common denominator is what we have.

But a focus on readers rather than advertisers as the heart of business model will, inevitably, create a more segmented dynamic, as the strongest appeals to readers tend to be in niches, and as, to venture an impolite reminder, some readers are a great deal more valuable than others. This is not only because some readers have more money to spend on content (as they do, admittedly, on the goods and services offered by advertisers), although that is true. But it is also, and ultimately more importantly true, that some readers are willing to spend more time, to develop greater loyalty to particular content, to value it more highly.

Improved search, and diminished SEO, should tend place a greater value on such readers, elevating content of higher value, higher quality and, therefore, higher cost.

That would matter a great deal.
search  google  media  online  technology  mobile  marketing  economics  attention  reading 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
TED 2011: Junk Food Algorithms and the World They Feed Us | Epicenter | Wired.com
“It’s your own personal, unique universe of information that you live in online,” Pariser said. “What’s in it depends on who you are and what you do. But the thing is, you don’t decide what gets in, and you don’t see what gets edited out.”
attention  politics  social  facebook  twitter  technology  reputation  aggregation  curation 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Voices: News organizations must become hubs of trusted data in a market seeking (and valuing) trust » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
The maximum size of money moved by trust is the combined value of all advertising, PR, and the millions of hours people spend searching for a reliable piece of information or good advice on what product they should get. In other words, it’s huge, and no one who is just in for a quick dollar can compete. If media companies find a winning combination of data and good stories to fulfill that need, they will be vaulted out of a dying market defined by technology (printing presses, radio stations, satellites) and into the trust market.

In a multiplatform world, “trust” is the defining attribute that moves goods and services. Most marketing and advertising can’t be trusted: The system behind it does not allow buyers to learn if the newest camera from a company is actually any good. Advertising will always try to create a good impression for a product and service, but eventually people learn that it’s not the looks of a product that makes it valuable, but its day-to-day usability.
attention  media  journalism  technology  power  news  relationships  ethics  behavior 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Ni Hao's Your Chinese? - James Fallows - International - The Atlantic
Linguistically, things in other foreign languages that are easy to forget in seven months, like verb conjugations or noun declensions, are just not an issue in Chinese. The grammar lacks the baggage of endings in Romance and Germanic languages, and certainly Russian and Japanese that can go in one ear and out the other of language learners. I am grateful every day for the lightness, by contrast, of throwing out a string of simple Chinese words, one after the other, and not really caring if they're nouns, verbs, or adjectives because they can often be all of the above!

I know, I know, there are some other constraints and some regulated word order, but by comparison with most other languages, Mandarin grammar is easy. And the Chinese somehow grasp the gist behind clumsy word order, and quickly rearrange my words for me, like tiles in a game of anagrams.
language  china  asia  education  learning  speech  attention 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
I Will Check My Phone At Dinner And You Will Deal With It
Is part of it antisocial? Sure. Can it lead to distractions if you read a work-related email that you need to respond to? Of course. But this is the way the world works now. We’re always connected and always on call. And some of us prefer it that way.
dinner  food  mobile  technology  friendship  relationships  culture  attention  presence  social 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
How journalists are using metrics to track the success of tweets | Poynter.
“The thing is, I am insistent that my tweets be very human-sounding and a genuine representation of myself, so it might sound counterintuitive to make decisions based on data,” Victor told me. “But I don’t think there’s a conflict there, and I don’t think it makes you a robot. Looking at the data is just listening to what your followers are silently telling you.”
data  information  journalism  media  blogging  twitter  news  attention  audience  curation  reputation  business  technology 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Web of Popularity, Achieved by Bullying - NYTimes.com
Using the maps, the researchers tracked the students most often accused of aggressive behavior. They found that increases in social status were associated with subsequent increases in aggression. But notably, aggressive behavior peaked at the 98th percentile of popularity and then dropped.

“At the very top you start to see a reversal — the kids in the top 2 percent are less likely to be aggressive,” Dr. Faris said. “The interpretation I favor is that they no longer need to be aggressive because they’re at the top, and further aggression could be counterproductive, signaling insecurity with their social position.

“It’s possible that they’re incredibly friendly and everybody loves them and they were never mean, but I’m not so convinced by that, because there are so many kids right behind them in the hierarchy who are highly aggressive.”
children  education  teenagers  status  attention  reputation  power  school  social  celebrity 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Economics of Blogging and The Huffington Post - NYTimes.com
One reason that The Huffington Post gets a lot of criticism for not paying its bloggers is because most people think of it as a publishing company, when really — like Facebook — it is more of a technology company. Whether the content is paid or unpaid, the site is able to generate a comparatively large amount of revenue from it because of things like search engine optimization, and the way that its editors use their page space: a poorly-performing article will all but disappear from the site almost as soon as it is posted, while a strong one can hold its 32-point headline for hours. The Huffington Post, also, makes itself “stickier” by providing an abundance of links to other articles and to social networking tools.
data  blogging  news  journalism  media  newspapers  technology  business  aol  attention  economics 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Foursquare Learns Spanish, Japanese, Italian, German and French - NYTimes.com
“Why can’t you save art exhibits that you see on Tumblr to Foursquare,” he said. “The next time you’re in Boston, your phone can buzz and say, oh hey, here are five things you said you wanted to do.”

“Devices are getting smarter,” he said. “They’re changing the way we experience the world and our physical space.”
location  local  technology  twitter  geography  mapping  urban  attention  presence 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Why The New York Times Will Lose to The Huffington Post | Epicenter | Wired.com
Rather than learning from or trying to emulate HuffPo’s hugely valuable editorial technology, then, the NYT is sticking its head in the sand and retreating to a defensive stance of trying to make as much money as possible from its core loyal readers. There’s no growth in such a strategy. Indeed, the opposite is true: the NYT is making it both hard and expensive to become a core loyal reader. Meanwhile, the open web will become ever more accessible and social, with friends pointing friends to news in a site-agnostic manner. The NYT is distancing itself from that conversation, standing proud and aloof. It’s a strategy which is doomed to fail.
nytimes  journalism  media  newspapers  blogging  attention  social  reading  business  paywall  technology 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Reflections of a Newsosaur: Prime time for iPad may be prime time
While these findings suggest interesting ways to release, package and market content for the iPad, it also must be noted that the research is limited to a sample of people who are sufficiently motivated to time-shift content to use this particular app.

Until someone researches consumption patterns across the entire universe of iPad owners, we won’t know whether this group of users is typical or exceptional.

If a broader study finds that prime time indeed is the prime time for iPad use, newspaper publishers may want to consider producing products that come out early in the evening, instead of in the morning or after their print products are put to bed at midnight.

Fresh news timed to arrive at dinnertime would be an interesting blast from the past for those of us who once worked on afternoon newspapers.
mobile  ipad  news  journalism  media  tablet  apple  technology  attention 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
AriannaOL « BuzzMachine
I crosspost on HuffPo — see this post there (how meta can you get?) — because I get more attention from a wider audience.

In the link economy, there are two creations of value and two opportunities to make use of that value: the creation of the content and the creation of the audience for it, via links. HuffPo brings me links to people and for me, it’s worth it to post there. No one — not even the quite persuasive Arianna — is forcing me. I do it out of my self-interest. Huffington Post was smart enough to build a business, a scalable and efficient business, out of that self-interest.

To think that content must be something that is created only by content companies that pay content people to create it is, like or not, outmoded. Content is no longer scarce, people. It is abundant. Google understands that. Twitter understands that. Huffington Post understands that. Sadly, old content people from old content companies still do not. Therein lies a lesson in this acquisition.
attention  blogging  business  aol  creativity  media  google  twitter 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Creator of Instant Messaging Protocol to Launch App Platform for Your Life
Your personal data will likely be of interest on its own, as a type of diary, but it's probably going to be much more interesting and useful when cross-referenced with other sets of data. Those other sets of data will provide context, surfacing correlations and patterns that would otherwise be invisible. Recommendations, personalization, alerts, benchmarks, social and self assessment: the types of value adds that can be built on top of a good data set are just beginning to be explored. And there are few data sets as interesting, to you, than you.
data  information  attention  identity  technology  social  presence 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Joho the Blog » We are the medium
It is easy to slip back into the old paradigm in which there is a human sender, a message, a medium through which it travels, and a human recipient. It’s easy because that’s an accurate abstraction that is sometimes useful. It’s easy because the Internet is also used for traditional communication. But what is distinctive and revolutionary about the Internet is the failure of the old diagram to capture what so often is essential: We are not users of the medium, and we are not outside of the medium listening to its messages. Rather, we are the medium.
mcluhan  media  audience  theory  attention  reputation  internet  social  JournoCensus 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Sue de Beer’s Latest Video, at Park Avenue Armory - NYTimes.com
“As an artist, you shed all these objects which were the ‘you’ back in the moment when you made them,” she said. “And then you go back and hardly recognize them and feel like the person who made them wasn’t you but someone else, like a sister or something. And you wonder ‘What was she like?’ ”
memory  art  creativity  attention  identity  beauty  nyc  nytimes  video 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Pitchfork: Poptimist: Poptimist #35
The provisional quality of choices is a hot topic in a world where design and services are highly iterative. Facebook has become something close to a global constant by continually changing and tweaking its service based on the real-time user data it receives-- a giant ongoing experiment in the kind of cybernetics which so fascinated Eno in the 70s. The simultaneous rise of the app as a software delivery system pushes this idea further out into consumer culture. People get used to the software they buy as iterative-- subject to continuous tinkering, upgrades, and improvements. And as that becomes the norm in one area of culture, it changes expectations everywhere else. Again, it's not unfinished-- you expect Facebook, or an app-- to work. But it's unfixed-- you don't expect it to stay the same for long.
technology  music  attention  facebook  social  business  software  design 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The economics of love - Coupling: Dating, marriage and other relationships - Salon.com
"Economics is the study of how people and societies allocate scarce resources. Relationships involve two people who are sharing scarce resources -- whether that's time, energy, libidos, money, ambition, patience, whatever -- and that's of course going to involve trade-offs."
economics  relationships  love  technology  data  information  men  women  sex  marriage  beauty  attention  money  dating 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Breaking Down the DNA of a Hit Song - Speakeasy - WSJ
Going the way of long intros, at least in pop, is the ballad. In a field littered with thumping club tracks (see Taio Cruz’s “Dynamite”) and mid-tempo “sex jams,” as Frank calls them, the top-selling ballad was “If I Die Young” by the young country act The Band Perry—which topped out at only No. 59. With only a handful of rock bands represented in the top 100, including Paramore and Neon Trees, rockers vying for crossover success should take cues from prevailing pop trends, Frank says: “Now is not the time to go esoteric or to go heavy. No power ballads, for sure.”

Murphy and Frank also delved into subject matter, breaking lyrics down into some thematic categories. In pop, Frank found that 21% of the top 100 sellers dealt with maneuvering someone into bed (typically from the dancefloor); testifying about love was less common (17%); followed by falling out of love (16%), partying (16%) and sheer boasting (9%).
songwriting  pop  music  writing  attention  research 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
How Lady Gaga Just Reinvented Eye Contact
Maybe it won't catch on. Maybe kids will go nuts with it. I don't know! But I do know that this gadget dovetails perfectly with what the future is starting to smell like: Less the crisp clear world of touch interfaces with meta data on everything, everywhere. And more like the micro broadcasted one we contribute to every time we tweet, post or share.
technology  fashion  style  psychology  social  presence  attention 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Kanye West - ‘My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy’ - NYTimes.com
Welcome to 2011, a year that — once the last of the snow is scraped away — will bring new hope, the promise of renewal, a chance to wake up in a world in which Kanye West’s “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy” is not the consensus pick for album of the year. [...]
attention  reputation  music  criticism  pop  hiphop  art  creativity  social  power 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
NYT: Sustainable Love - Tara Parker
While the notion of self-expansion may sound inherently self-serving, it can lead to stronger, more sustainable relationships, Dr. Lewandowski says.

"If you're seeking self-growth and obtain it from your partner, then that puts your partner in a pretty important position," he explains. "And being able to help your partner's self-expansion would be pretty pleasing to yourself."

The concept explains why people are delighted when dates treat them to new experiences, like a weekend away. But self-expansion isn't just about exotic experiences. Individuals experience personal growth through their partners in big and small ways. It happens when they introduce new friends, or casually talk about a new restaurant or a fascinating story in the news.
psychology  love  marriage  relationships  power  work  creativity  science  education  identity  attention  presence 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Boredom Enthusiasts Discover the Pleasures of Understimulation - WSJ.com
Journalist and author Naomi Alderman spoke about the difficulty of having to observe the Jewish Sabbath as a child. Her talk, "What It's Like to Do Almost Nothing Interesting for 25 Hours a Week," ended on an unexpected, touching note. "When we learn to tolerate boredom," she said, "we find out who we really are."
religion  spirituality  attention  psychology  judaism  conferences  uk 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Searching for Sustainable Habits in Journalism « Groundswell
There is not going to be one business model, the future of news will be diverse and multifaceted, but there will be some core practices and habits that should infuse what we do. I believe these new news habits can help create a more sustainable journalism.
journalism  media  newspapers  online  attention 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Groupon, Google, and value on the Internet : The New Yorker
When we think about the Internet, we often think of businesses in black-and-white terms: either they’re huge, world-changing hits or they’re flops. But that’s a false dichotomy. These days, the Web is full of good, solid businesses that may not be remaking the world but that are helping give people what they want. If that’s what Groupon ends up being, well, there are worse fates. 
business  google  online  technology  attention  marketing  social  money 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Readers With Plenty to Say - NYTimes.com
Having opened Pandora’s box of comments, The Times now faces a huge challenge meeting reader expectations. Some of the problems could be fixed, I believe, by more communication from The Times — more frequent and prominent explanation of things like comment cutoffs.

But the larger problem is capacity. The Times needs to supplement its comment moderation staff to meet the demand, either with more people or additional analytical tools, or both.

Failing that, it will not capture the full value, and loyalty, of an engaged readership that isn’t content merely to read.
comments  community  nytimes  reading  newspapers  moderation  attention  behavior  business 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Internet Now as Popular as TV, Survey Shows - Digits - WSJ
So what are people doing less? Listening to the radio and reading things like newspapers and magazines offline, according to the survey. (We at Digits guess they might be spending less time doing other things too, like “going outside.”)
radio  newspapers  media  magazines  television  online  research  technology  shopping  business  attention 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Songs They Carried: Music at War - Americana and roots music - No Depression
As personal technology spread into the field alongside military technology, soldiers blast into earbuds what they previously would have shared with comrades on Vietnam-era 45s and radio, and Gulf War I-era cassette Walkmen hooked to PAs. While decreasing fighting in the barracks about what music to play, Ricks does worry about unit cohesiveness, because the battlefield is "the loneliest place on earth... you don't want soldiers feeling alone, you want a group feeling." The fractured music landscape created by personal technology doesn't the create the opportunity for group feelings, just as our professional, volunteer military reduces shared experiences between soldier and civilian.
war  military  music  technology  psychology  attention 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Burghound, For the Love of Port, and other great niche wine sites. - By Mike Steinberger - Slate Magazine
It is one part opportunity, one part necessity. Thanks to this global quality revolution, there are more wine-growing areas than ever that merit undivided attention, and the Internet has given wine journalists a cheap and easy platform from which to peddle that kind of particularized knowledge. But because of the Internet, there are also probably more people than ever writing about wine. Anyone with a computer and a corkscrew can be a critic now; offering regional expertise is a way of standing out in an increasingly crowded field.
wine  socialmedia  beverages  attention  blogging  social  drinking  alcohol 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Why the Kindle Is Losing Me, by Sarah Lacy - Techcrunch
Technology is about adding features and functionality to a thing that was limited before– not taking them away. The only way the Kindle survives in an iPad world is by appealing to hardcore readers and students. Amazon needs to fix this now.
education  kindle  books  ipad  reading  attention  behavior 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
I, Reader by Alexander Chee - The Morning News
The world remains beautiful and terrible at the same time, and either way, I know it doesn’t care what I think or feel about it. There are things to do to help others, and there are things that may never change. But if I learned anything from all of this, it’s my first, oldest lesson as a reader: There is always going to be a book that saves you. There is also a new lesson: You do not know how it will get to you.
writing  attention  books  culture  behavior  fiction  ipad  kindle  reading  nonfiction  relationships 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Pitchfork: Why We Fight: Why We Fight #8
We can probably spend a minute thinking about all the things that might be lost without the model of the album as a coherent statement-- the same way we can worry about what happens if people rarely sit down for deep, focused engagement with something like a book. But you can't really deny that this ongoing-stream version of following music is a good match for how people experience life and consume information. It's actually the same vantage on pop music that's always been held-- by radio listeners, party regulars, mixtape shoppers, pop-chart followers, folks everywhere. Packets and bursts and narratives.
business  celebrity  hiphop  music  pop  attention  story  radio  life  information  books  presence 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Why spreadable doesn’t equal viral: A conversation with Henry Jenkins » Nieman Journalism Lab
NU: What is spreadable media?

HJ: The concept of spreadable media rests on the distinction between distribution (the top-down spread of media content as captured in the broadcast paradigm) and circulation (a hybrid system where content spreads as a result of a series of informal transactions between commercial and noncommercial participants.) Spreadable media is media which travels across media platforms at least in part because the people take it in their own hands and share it with their social networks.
media  journalism  news  culture  web  socialnetworking  theory  socialmedia  libraries  social  attention  public 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Curation And The Human Web... - SVW
Aggregation looks like curation but it's not.

I define curation as a person, or a group of people, engaged in choosing and presenting a collection of things related to a specific topic and context.

Aggregation employs software (algorithms) and machines (servers) to assemble a collection of things related to a specific topic and context.

Aggregation tools can be employed by curators but the human act of curation adds a layer of value that aggregation alone cannot provide.
media  social  web  publishing  socialmedia  curation  attention  journalism  technology 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Scrawl of Duty: Novelists and Journos Defect to Video Game Industry | The New York Observer
"I'd been a journalist for 14 years. I had accomplished most of what I'd wanted to accomplish. I wrote cover stories, I'd written lots of features, I had this blog, I'd been on TV. It felt like there were structural changes affecting journalism, and going to another outlet would be a bit like same shit, different day. I felt like it was time to do something different; it was time to not be a journalist. The main thing to consider was, did I want to try to write games?"
journalism  media  writing  business  games  attention  fiction 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Cleve Jones on youth activism and his early years with Harvey Milk » North by Northwestern
Now, I think that there are certain fundamentals to organizing that have remained constant throughout all of the changes: the importance of building committees, the importance of crossing boundaries and barriers between people.

If you’re organizing workers, you have to tell their stories. If you’re working on repealing Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, it’s so important to hear the stories of military personnel and military families gay and straight alike. Whatever the issue, if you can focus as much as possible on daily lives of ordinary people, that’s what has remained unchanged.

But there’s a whole lot that’s different now: the communications technology, the growing gap between rich and poor, the financial free fall that we’re enduring right now. And I do want to say to your readers, who I assume are all on Facebook: if you think you’re going to change the world by clicking a mouse, I’m sorry, but you’re mistaken.
facebook  activism  gay  history  unions  power  technology  attention  story 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Henryk Gorecki, Polish Composer of Hit Symphony, Dies at 76 - NYTimes.com
“I think about my audience, but I am not writing for them. If I were thinking of my audience and one likes this, one likes that, one likes another thing, I would never know what to write. Let every listener choose that which interests him. I have nothing against one person liking Mozart or Shostakovich or Leonard Bernstein, but doesn’t like Gorecki. That’s fine with me. I, too, like certain things.”
attention  identity  creativity  aesthetics  classical  music  classicalmusic 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Parsing Online Data to Find You a Date | Sam Yagan | Big Think
So it is a little bit of a marketing game, but it’s also a numbers game. So you should be reaching out to more people. Don’t be afraid about sending a message to somebody, even if you think you might be, you know, out of your league or not necessarily the best match for you. You have to go out there and you have to put those messages out there. You have to try. Don’t just cut and paste the same messages you sent to the last girl. Customize it. Think about "How do I actually get this specific person, guy or girl to write me back?"
dating  relationships  data  information  attention  presence  writing  identity  technology  love  research 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
John Doe – Wolf at the door « Americana and Roots Music - No Depression
“So that’s what I aspire to. Having a few of those moments now and then. As you sing more, I find that you’re able to appreciate it more, and you’re able to put yourself in a totally open space so you’re not mentally trying to do something. You’re just letting it happen, which is great. Then you can find those moments, when it’s just happening. It’s not something you can do easily or by will. You just get into it.”
music  songwriting  attention  beauty 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Putting Twitter to Work with ThinkUp - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education
ThinkUp can indeed archive your tweets. And with the included Facebook plugin, it can archive your Facebook status updates, along with your friends’ comments to those updates.

But what makes ThinkUp different from other archiving solutions is that it also archives responses to your tweets. And it organizes them. It works like this: if you ask a question on Twitter and somebody replies, that reply is included in the archive and associated with your question.
twitter  data  information  social  attention 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Hugh Hefner has been good for us - Roger Ebert's Journal
You may believe Playboy was the enemy of women. It objectified their bodies. It schooled men to regard them as sex objects. It stood for all that feminists fought to correct. There is some truth to that, but it doesn't impact upon my experience, and the best I can do here is be truthful.

Nobody taught me to regard women as sex objects. I always did. Most men do. And truth to tell, most women regard men as sex objects. We regard many other aspects of another person, but sex is the elephant in the room. Evolution has hard-wired us that way. When we meet a new person, in some small recess of our minds we evaluate that person as a sex partner. We don't act on it, we don't dwell on it, but we do it. You know we do. And this process continues bravely until we are old and feeble.
sex  men  women  magazines  love  relationships  identity  attention  presence  writing  journalism 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Value of Your Time and How it Impacts the Internet Video vs Traditional TV battle « blog maverick
I’m going to let you in on a secret. The only 20 somethings that are going to consume media in 10 years the way they do today are the ones without a job, still living with their parents.

I’m going to let you in on another secret. The older you get, the faster time goes by. I’m sure there is some scientific explanation for this phenomena. I don’t know it. But I know it is true. Months and years go back faster and faster the older you get.

Which in turn leads to the next truism. The older you get, the more you value your time. You quickly learn that your most valuable possession/asset isn’t one you put on a balance sheet or in your home. It is time. Every minute, hour, day is one you will never get back and there is nothing you can do to earn another.

So what does this have to do with Internet, Internet video and traditional TV ?
news  internet  video  socialmedia  social  television  time  attention 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
‘Mad Men’ Is an Eerie Echo of Advertising Reality - NYTimes.com
“Despite all the changes in advertising, despite all the technological advances, some things never change. No matter how big you are, you’re still dependent on connections, office politics and the whims of the clients.”
marketing  television  1960s  amctv  reputation  attention  business 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
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