aetles + developers + mac   3

Why developers, customers should be wary of the Mac App Store | Macworld
Perhaps, at this point, you’re wondering what you should do. The first step is concluding how you feel about the Mac App Store and Apple’s increasingly strict rules regarding the apps that can be sold there. If you don’t mind them, keep contentedly shopping in the store.

But take pause. When we talk about the importance of backing up, we often say that it’s a question of when, not if, your hard drive will fail. With the Mac App Store, it’s nearing certainty that if you haven’t yet been stymied by the impact of one of Apple’s Mac App Store rules, you will be soon.

That stymieing might take one of several forms: A developer of an app you love might release a brand new version with a brand new price tag, since there’s no option to offer upgrade pricing. An app you love may be forced to strip out features you depend upon to comply with Apple’s rules. Or developers behind an app you love may find that they simply can’t keep the app in the Mac App Store anymore, and pull it (see Postbox, Alfred, TextExpander, and Moom, each of which has been forced to move out of the App Store and return to a direct sales only model). Whether you’ll be able to “cross-grade” from your Mac App Store version of that app to a standalone, external version will be at the whim (and maybe even technical expertise) of the developer in question.

While the Mac App Store remains a fine place to buy certain software titles today, the issues are real, and Apple thus far has displayed its characteristic determination to stick to its current plan. If you’re concerned, you have two tools you can use: The first is to stop shopping at the Mac App Store when possible, and buy apps direct from developers instead. And the second is to share your feedback with Apple directly.

It’s definitely too soon to panic about the future of the Mac App Store and OS X. But it’s not too soon to be concerned.
apple  macappstore  sandboxing  mac  developers 
august 2012 by Aetles
Sandbox of frustration: Apple's walled garden closes in on Mac developers | The Verge
However, most developers have taken the past few months to update their apps according to Apple's new standards — which for some developers means checking a few boxes, and for others means sacrificing features users love. Since Mountain Lion was announced, many top apps like Fantastical, Sparrow, and 1Password have prepared for a Mac world that looks more like iOS's perceived "walled garden." For better or for worse, most developers seem to agree that adding support for Mountain Lion seems to be a do or die.

"Any developer who wants to build for Apple's products typically stays as on pace with the curve as possible, because that's what a significant portion of Apple's customers do," says 1Password's David Chartier. Developers now have two choices: sell unrestricted apps independent of the Mac App Store, or abide by Apple's rules to gain access to the App Store, its enormous distribution power, and new features in OS X like iCloud document syncing for apps and iOS-style push notifications from the cloud in Notification Center.
sandboxing  developers  macappstore  mac  apple 
august 2012 by Aetles
Regarding reaction to the reaction to Sparrow being end-of-lined | iMore.com
The reaction to Sparrow is no different than than the reaction to Tweetie being replaced by the new Twitter for iPhone. It's no different than the reaction to Firefly being canceled.
mac  developers  users  sellout  sparrow  customers 
july 2012 by Aetles

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