aetles + developers + development   3

On Being a Designer and a Developer: Not Quite Unicorn Rare by Diogenes Brito
As Austin Bales says in a great talk, good designers and good developers actually have a lot in common. The crossover really even shows itself in our language when we use (appropriate) terms like "social engineering" for techniques designers use to illicit certain behaviors, or "software design" for the planning and creation of programming code. Both designers and developers put a premium on simplicity and clarity. Both are trying to make their creations as easy to intuit and work with as possible. Developers refactor their code as requirements change and complexity increases the same way designers redesign interfaces to make room for new or changing functionality. They have similar traits, skills, and motivations, they just work in different mediums and have different specialties. Designers tend to specialize and focus on the beginning of the creation process, whereas engineers specialize on the end or latter half of the process. I say a more accurate representation of a single person's skills might look something like this:

Each person has a certain level of skill in the designer and/or developer subject areas, where many of the skills and habits that would make you excel in either area would help in both. People may have a tendency to lean towards one area over the other, but no one has a "type" that would prevent them from learning and improving as a designer or a developer. What matters is the time and effort put into learning. World class designers and developers have put in lots and lots of dedicated practice: their (proverbial) 10,000 hours.
design  developer  development  designers  developers 
may 2013 by Aetles
The Problem With iCloud | TightWind
iCloud’s promise is a dream: your contacts, calendar, backups, songs, documents and application data are on all of your devices, whenever and wherever you need them. No need to worry about moving files from device to device on a flash drive or emailing them or any of the other crazy stuff we used to do. All of your stuff, always there when you need it. If that were completely the case, it would be a no-brainer for me. I’d implement iCloud syncing immediately, because that idea—never having to worry about where my stuff is again—is one of those ideas that makes my heart flutter with excitement.

Unfortunately, that’s not the case.
icloud  apple  ios  osx  sync  development  developers 
august 2012 by Aetles
Developers dish on iCloud's challenges | Macworld
With services like Dropbox, Google Docs, and even IMAP email, users today expect their data to remain up-to-date and available on every device. iOS users want conflict-free access to their data—whether it's documents, in-game progress, or other details—on their iPads, iPhones, and Macs. Apple aims to satisfy that user need with iCloud.

With iCloud, Apple promises developers that they can keep their users’ data in sync. But while a steadily increasing number of developers are implementing iCloud support within their apps, its adoption rate still seems surprisingly low overall.

Are developers hesitant to embrace iCloud? And if so, why?
apple  cloud  icloud  ios  osx  development  developers  sync  from instapaper
july 2012 by Aetles

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