JordanFurlong + skills + training   12

The Skills Gap Part 1: What Competencies will Lawyers Need to Stay Relevant in the Future? | Rainmaking Oasis, LLC
In our efforts to develop a better way to define the range of competencies needed, we came across The Delta Model that was initially developed by a team spearheaded by Dan Linna, a professor at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law and was joined by Alyson Carrel and Jesse Bowman (also of Northwestern,) Shellie Reid of Northern Virginia Legal Services and Jordan Galvin of Mayer Brown, Knowledge Management.  After conducting additional research and with added insights from Caitlin Moon of Vanderbilt Law School, Gabriel Teninbaum at Suffolk Law School and Natalie Runyon of Thompson Reutter, the group released its Delta Model 2.0 in March 2019. One of their primary findings was that Personal Effectiveness skills are the most important lawyer competencies. The Delta Model model breaks lawyer competencies into three buckets:
competence  training  admission  skills  talent 
may 2019 by JordanFurlong
Riverview Law Legal Re-Train Programme Launches! - Riverview Law
The Riverview Law Legal Re-Train Programme launched on Friday 1st June 2018. The programme continues to build on the company strategy of contributing to the development of the legal market. With a growing number of lawyers seeking to enhance their careers by moving into commercial contracts, Riverview Law sees its first 10 lawyers embarking on a 2 year training programme. The programme will take them from a wide variety of specialisms including family law, PI, litigation, industrial disease and employment, and re-train them as commercial contracts lawyers.

Riverview Law has a proud history of growing its own people with a well-established training contracts programme incorporating an SRA approved Technology seat. The development of the Riverview Law Legal Re-Train Programme continues this theme with those undertaking the programme being exposed to:

Commercial contracts legal training;
‘On the job’ commercial experience in at least 2 areas of Riverview Law’s Managed Service and/or Projects business areas; and
The utilisation of Kim and other technologies for the legal industry.
“The Legal Re-Train Programme is an exciting opportunity for us as a business and lawyers in the industry. Having seen the high calibre candidates from other disciplines who are seeking a career in commercial contracts, we knew this was another excellent opportunity to grow our business and support the evolution of the legal market. Our kick off session was full of laughter and enthusiasm with everyone eager to get the programme up and running. We look forward to welcoming our next cohort in the very near future too!”  Sonia Williamson, Head of Managed Services & Projects, Riverview Law.
training  newlaw  skills  admission  schools 
june 2018 by JordanFurlong
The Institute for the Future of Law Practice (043) | Legal Evolution
IFLP (“i-flip”) will be hosting training bootcamps in May 2018 in Chicago (at Northwestern Law) and Boulder (at Colorado Law). The bootcamps are designed to prep law students for sophisticated legal and business work settings. Each student admitted to the program is paired with a legal employer for either a 10-week summer internship or a 7-month field placement. All internships and field placements are paid. The IFLP program currently includes four law schools — Northwestern, Colorado, Indiana, and Osgoode Hall (Toronto) — though the plan is to build an infrastructure that will support and serve a significantly larger number of law students, law schools, and legal employers.

Rather than summarize the contents of the IFLP website, I am going to use this post to answer four questions:

What problem is IFLP trying to solve?
How will IFLP be successful?
Where did IFLP come from?
How can industry stakeholders become involved?
schools  training  innovation  skills 
february 2018 by JordanFurlong
Blog
For a long time, simply ‘knowing the law’ was the sole requirement for lawyers to deliver legal services. Those days are over. The future lawyer must augment core legal knowledge with other skills including (1) understanding technology’s application to and impact on the delivery of legal services (e.g. e-discovery, cyber-security, contract management, legal research, etc.); (2) project/process management; (3) basic business fluency; (4) client management; (5) collaboration; (6) sales and marketing; (7) an understanding of global legal marketplace developments; (8) cultural awareness for what has become a global profession; and (9) emotional intelligence/’people skills.’ Emotional intelligence is widely overlooked as a critical legal skill. Top lawyers with high intellect (IQ) and people skills (EQ) will always thrive, no matter how pervasive technology becomes in legal delivery. Future lawyers, like physicians who have morphed from medical practice to the delivery of healthcare, will return to the role of ‘trusted advisers.’ They will interpret data and apply their professional judgment to solve client challenges. In some ways, future lawyers will be ‘returning to basics’ and performing only those tasks that they are uniquely trained to do. Technology, process, and other paraprofessionals and professionals will liberate them to focus on these core tasks. This will better serve clients even if there might sometimes be a harsh economic impact on mid-career attorneys caught between two different legal delivery models.
skills  training  future 
october 2017 by JordanFurlong
What Is Legal Operations - CLOC
Strategic Planning:  Create a long-term strategy, aligning yearly goals and corresponding metrics.
Financial Management:  Manage the departmental budget. Track accruals and forecasting.  Work with Finance to identify spending trends, potential cost savings and efficiency opportunities.
Vendor Management:  Create a vendor management program to insure quality outside counsel support at the right rates and under optimal fee arrangements. Hold regular business reviews.  Negotiate fee agreements.  Drive governance of billing guidelines.
Data Analytics: Collect and analyze relevant data from department tools and industry sources, define objectives to provide metrics and dashboards, that drive efficiencies and optimize spend, etc.
Technology Support:  Create a long-term technology roadmap including tools such as e-billing/matter management, contract management, content management, IP management, business process management, e-signature, board management, compliance management, legal hold, subsidiary management, etc.
Alternative Support Models:  Drive departmental efficiency by leveraging managed services, LPOs, and other service providers.
Knowledge Management: Enable efficiencies by creating seamless access to legal & department institutional knowledge through the organization and centralization of key templates, policies, processes, memos, and other learnings.
Professional Development and Team Building: Deliver improved GC Staff and overall team performance by globalizing the team and creating a culture of growth, development, collaboration and accountability.
Communications:  Work collaboratively across the legal ecosystem to create consistent global processes, from on boarding to complex project management support.  Publish regular departmental communications, plan and execute all-hands.
Global Data Governance / Records Management:  Create a records management program including a record retention schedule, policies and processes.
Litigation Support: Support e-discovery, legal hold, document review.
Cross-Functional Alignment:  Create and drive relationships with other key company functions, such as HR, IT, Finance and Workplace Resources.  Represent the Legal organization at CLOC.
ops  skills  training  future 
july 2017 by JordanFurlong
CLOC Legal Operations Career Skills Toolkit: Lawyers, Your Clients Value Legal-Service Delivery Skills | LegalTech Lever
CLOC divides legal-operations skills into IQ (“hard”) skills and EQ (“soft”) skills:

IQ Skills

Business Operations
Data, Analysis & Reporting
eDiscovery
Financial
Knowledge & Content
Outside Counsel
Practice-Specific
Process & Project
Strategy
Substantive Law
Talent & People
Technology
EQ Skills

Communication
Innovation
Management
Personality
Project Management
Teamwork
For each skill, CLOC provides links to five “reading” and five “education” resources—180 skill-building resources.

In an industry sorely lacking in best practices and standards, CLOC aims to build community and drive positive change to help legal industry players optimize legal-service delivery models. All law students, lawyers, and legal-services professionals can learn a lot from the CLOC toolkit and the skill-building resources it identifies. Download the CLOC toolkit, assess your current skills, and start using the resources to improve your legal-service delivery skills today!
ops  client  skills  training 
may 2017 by JordanFurlong
The ‘plus-shaped’ lawyer for the 21st century
We often speak of lawyers adding value. We need to add value for our clients and to our organizations. As 21st-century lawyers, especially in Canada, we also need to be able to work alongside lawyers from different ethnic backgrounds, cultures and experiences. A successful lawyer in the 21st century, I would argue, also needs to possess critical interpersonal and empathy skills and they need to value diversity and inclusiveness. They must also understand and be able to adapt unique approaches, as Mark Webber noted during his session on story-telling at the conference, to make sure their messages are being understood and retained by the listener.

In my respectful submission, beyond a breadth of knowledge in various subject matters, these are all skills that set a spectacular lawyer apart from a mediocre one. I have, therefore, added these critical skills to a box immediately above the horizontal line of the broad subject matter expertise of a T-shaped lawyer. They are skills that are necessary to make one a truly successful, value-added lawyer. It is this plus-shaped lawyer for the 21st century that we should all strive to become.
skills  training  innovation 
may 2017 by JordanFurlong
3 Geeks and a Law Blog: The Rise of the Tech-Savvy Unicorn...err...Laywer
I yield to no one in my commitment to lawyers developing better tech skills. But that commitment in no way detracts from my affinity for the growing importance of allied professionals. Indeed, one of the objectives of improving lawyer tech skills/comfort is to help them appreciate the role allied professionals can play in delivering superior legal service. While I support the call for lawyers to take ownership of their technical ineptitude, I am loath to endorse anything that would seem to diminish the potential contributions from allied professionals. I want more, not less, diverse teams.

My last couple of columns have made mention of the growing importance of legal operations. I'll write my legal ops post someday. Then again, I am being beat to it. Yesterday, the ACC released their CLO Survey, which found that law departments had doubled their legal ops headcount. The cover of this month's Legaltech News featured Mary O'Carroll, the head of legal ops for Google, and one of the leaders of CLOC. Mary is amazing. She has awards coming out the wazoo for her achievements in the legal industry. Mary, however, is not a lawyer. Apparently, Google doesn't care. Then again, what could they possibly know about tech.
it  skills  training 
january 2016 by JordanFurlong
How law firms are innovating when it comes to hiring - ABA Journal
The results of its initial effort surprised Kilpatrick Townsend. For starters, some of those candidates who looked great on paper, or even at lunch, failed measurably. The firm tells of one applicant who, when asked to work on a group project, stood apart from the group texting. The firm also reported that the more intensive interviewing effort had a tremendous “second order effect”: The lawyers and staff involved in this effort built bonds with one another and more self-consciously embraced the norms that the firm was seeking to develop.
Other law firms are developing similar experiments geared to discern more directly the competencies that lawyers will actually be called up to display in practice. At Womble Carlyle, for example, applicants are asked to submit a short video in which they respond to questions that call on them to demonstrate their thoughtfulness in addressing issues that they would face in practice.
Similarly, Schiff Hardin worked with Lawyer Metrics (a company founded by Indiana University Maurer School of Law Professor Bill Henderson) to develop structured behavioral panel interviews that it could use in its hiring rather than the legacy subjective model, which the firm believed was hurting its efforts to find the best talent and promote a more diverse talent pool. (For a compelling challenge to the profession on the need to redouble diversity efforts, see Deborah Rhode’s piece here.) The firm complemented these interviews with a writing assignment—one that involved summarizing legal information for a non-lawyer—that all applicants were asked to complete onsite at the firm during the interview. The firm’s professional development partner, Lisa Brown, reported that this approach generated more selectivity in giving offers, a greater rate of their acceptance (with the professionalism and fairness of the interview process cited as a significant factor), and a notably more diverse group.
talent  training  skills  firms 
july 2015 by JordanFurlong
How law firms are innovating when it comes to hiring - ABA Journal
cellence in a predefined set of competencies, including resilience, an ability to work in teams, empathy, and leadership, is central to getting hired. The interview process, therefore, is not about having an unstructured conversation at a meal. Rather, the applicants are invited to an offsite retreat that includes behavioral interviews with seven different law firm team members. The firm also asks everyone invited to this offsite event to conduct a group project and a writing assignment. In effect, the firm seeks to evaluate directly the sorts of activities that associates are asked to do on the job. For law firm hiring, this is a radical concept.
The results of its initial effort surprised Kilpatrick Townsend. For starters, some of those candidates who looked great on paper, or even at lunch, failed measurably. The firm tells of one applicant who, when asked to work on a group project, stood apart from the group texting. The firm also reported that the more intensive interviewing effort had a tremendous “second order effect”: The lawyers and staff involved in this effort built bonds with one another and more self-consciously embraced the norms that the firm was seeking to develop.
Other law firms are developing similar experiments geared to discern more directly the competencies that lawyers will actually be called up to display in practice. At Womble Carlyle, for example, applicants are asked to submit a short video in which they respond to questions that call on them to demonstrate their thoughtfulness in addressing issues that they would face in practice.
Similarly, Schiff Hardin worked with Lawyer Metrics (a company founded by Indiana University Maurer School of Law Professor Bill Henderson) to develop structured behavioral panel interviews that it could use in its hiring rather than the legacy subjective model, which the firm believed was hurting its efforts to find the best talent and promote a more diverse talent pool. (For a compelling challenge to the profession on the need to redouble diversity efforts, see Deborah Rhode’s piece here.) The firm complemented these interviews with a writing assignment—one that involved summarizing legal information for a non-lawyer—that all applicants were asked to complete onsite at the firm during the interview. The firm’s professional development partner, Lisa Brown, reported that this approach generated more selectivity in giving offers, a greater rate of their acceptance (with the professionalism and fairness of the interview process cited as a significant factor), and a notably more diverse group.
talent  laterals  training  skills 
july 2015 by JordanFurlong
The Future of Legal Practice and Technology for Law Professors – Slaw
I decided to take my 23 Things experiences and frequent future of law conference attendances and apply them to modern legal technology and practice issues. If one were to want to self-educate, especially if one were an academic, these are the topics and skills I think you should know. Please let me know in the comments if you think there should be additions. And if someone wants to run with the idea and do an 8-10 week 23 Things course, you have my permission to use any or all of this as a starting framework.
schools  training  skills  it 
may 2015 by JordanFurlong
Foundations for Practice Aims to Redefine Legal Education | IAALS Online
Law Week Colorado recently published an article detailing the launch of Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers’ Foundations for Practice project. The goal of the project is to give law schools more information about the skills, competencies, characteristics, and traits—referred to as “foundations”—that real-world practitioners say graduates need to be successful. Alli Gerkman, Director of Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers, said there are some obvious traditional skills that are important, such as legal writing and applying legal analysis, but there are also other skills and personality traits that are harder to measure, such as drive, grit, and communication skills. Once these foundations are identified, law schools can then tailor their programs and curriculum to incorporate them more fully.
schools  training  skills 
august 2014 by JordanFurlong

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