JordanFurlong + media   161

Meet the Press | Washington Spectator
“5 Potential Quick Victories for President Donald Trump: Few have high expectations for the President-elect’s foreign policy. But he could make some big improvements.”

Click the link. Print it out. Seal between two six-inch thick plates of Lexan glass and bury it 50 feet deep in a lead-lined bunker. Future archaeologists are going to need it. It will help them explain how a once-great civilization fell.
media 
december 2016 by JordanFurlong
Your Law Firm Is A Media Company - Lawyer Forward -
Whatever you sell, you have nothing without a buyer.

Your product may be perfect, you may have solved a major need or created great work, but you’ll never serve a soul unless someone finds you.

Vaynerchuk told the room that we are a media business first, and only after that work is done do we sell legal product. He said it so quickly that I imagine most of the room missed it. He spoke more on the subject throughout his talk, but never with that kind of precision:

You are a media company first, and then you sell legal product.
media  firms  marketing 
september 2016 by JordanFurlong
Platforms, distribution and audience — Benedict Evans
I've been writing a blog at ben-evans.com since 2010, more or less, first on self-hosted Wordpress, then Tumblr, and now Squarespace. In parallel, I've built up 90k or so Twitter followers and I have a newsletter with 40k subscribers, both of which serve in part to drive traffic back to the blog. This is what the monthly traffic looks like. 
media  publishing 
september 2015 by JordanFurlong
San Francisco Chronicle becomes first newspaper to crowdfund through Beacon | Poynter.
With its announcement, the Chronicle becomes the first major newspaper to crowdfund a reporting project through Beacon, a milestone that does not seem surprising in light of the startup’s recent collaborators. Within the last year, Beacon has joined forces with several news organizations, including The Huffington Post, Tech Dirt and The Texas Tribune, for increasingly ambitious projects.
media  publishers  crowdfunding 
september 2015 by JordanFurlong
Studying the link economy — BuzzMachine
There are two creations of value in media online: the creation of content and the creation of a public—an audience*—for that content. Online, content with no links to it has no value because it has no audience. It gains value as it gains links. Thus something of worth is created on each side of a click.
media  publishers  it  facebook 
august 2015 by JordanFurlong
Negotiating for News — Whither news? — Medium
Facebook did not set out to dominate the distribution of news. Neither did news organizations choose to let it. But now we are there, with Facebook providing a sizable and growing share of traffic to news — even before the advent of Instant Articles. Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Snapchat, Apple— they all present what we used to think of as our news to our readers. And so it is time to have a serious discussion about the principles and business terms at stake in this new era of distributed journalism.
media  publishing  facebook 
july 2015 by JordanFurlong
Pangea3 Cofounder Named President of Bloomberg BNA Legal · Robert Ambrogi's LawSites Robert Ambrogi's LawSites
Bloomberg BNA announced this morning that David Perla, cofounder of the global legal process outsourcing provider Pangea3, is joining the company as president of Bloomberg BNA Legal, effective July 21. Perla will report directly to Bloomberg BNA CEO Greg McCaffery and play a key leadership role in overseeing the company’s legal business, which includes legal, legislative, and regulatory news and analysis, and the Bloomberg Law legal and business intelligence research system.
publishers  media  innovation 
july 2014 by JordanFurlong
A Precarious Time for Legal Newspapers · Robert Ambrogi's LawSites Robert Ambrogi's LawSites
hy does this matter? There is an old saw in the news industry, “All news is local.” Nowhere is that more true than in the legal profession. Lawyers are state-focused creatures. Our licenses to practice are by state and, for the most part, the laws we work with are by state. Except where federal law intrudes, we deal primarily in state legislation and state courts.

If new ownership at either ALM or Dolan begins to make cuts, those cuts could chip away at the only sources we have for state and local legal news. If state legal newspapers close down or seriously curtail their operations, lawyers will be left without independent sources of legal news coverage.

General news organizations will not fill this void. Maybe bloggers will to some extent, but rarely with the reliability of these established news entities. Increasingly, our only source for news from our courts and legislatures may be those bodies themselves — and that’s not journalism.
media 
may 2014 by JordanFurlong
The newsonomics of big and little, from NBC News and GlobalPost to Thunderdome » Nieman Journalism Lab
“So a health channel has news on the latest health study, the Affordable Care Act, and on local hospital news. Local is always the priority on all channels. This is much harder than it sounds, as it means you have to have the ability to manage content at different levels (national, regional, local) to make it work. NewsCred is helping us architect a solution that allows us to do just that. We will start launching these channels this fall [with health] and will continue to roll out several a month [totaling 18] through next spring.” (For more on NewsCred, see “The Newsonomics of recycling journalism.”)
media 
september 2013 by JordanFurlong
BuzzFeed's Reza Aslan Video via Fox News Is a Traffic Bonanza | New Republic
There is much to be said about the interview Reza Aslan did Friday on Fox News’ online show “Spirited Debate.” Aslan, a Muslim writer who converted from Christianity (to which he had converted from Islam) who holds a doctorate in sociology of religions, just published a popular book about Jesus. Fox News, which like U.S. Steel is vertically integrated, ginned up “controversy” over the book by publishing an article claiming that the “liberal media” routinely fails to disclose that Aslan is a “devout Muslim,” and then reported on the (again, auto-fabricated) “controversy” by having host Lauren Green confront him with this. Having established Aslan’s Muslim-ness, Green conspiratorially asks, “It still begs the question: Why would you be interested in the founder of Christianity?” She then accuses him of obfuscating his faith, and he responds by noting that a statement of his religion appears on “the second page of my book” (page xviii, to be more precise). It’s amazing. Watch the whole thing.
media 
august 2013 by JordanFurlong
Streams of consciousness : Columbia Journalism Review
Social-media tools allow anyone with a Facebook or Twitter account to play a role in determining how many readers a story reaches. And online communities such as the heavily trafficked Reddit enable readers to submit links to their favorite content, and vote up or down the content submitted by others, thereby changing a given item’s prominence on the site. The result is that the mainstream-media oligopoly is now just one force deciding what “the news” is and how important a story or image might be.
publishing  media  facebook 
may 2013 by JordanFurlong
Some shifts in power visible in journalism today » Pressthink
“To some degree they have achieved what Tim Russert of NBC News had when he was host of Meet the Press. Sitting down for an interview with Swisher and Mossberg is a thing you do to show that you are a serious player…”
media  publishing  innovation 
february 2013 by JordanFurlong
“Post-Industrial Journalism”: A new Columbia report examines the disrupted news universe » Nieman Journalism Lab
There’s a big new report out from Columbia Journalism School this morning, entitled “Post-Industrial Journalism: Adapting to the Present.” Its authors are a sort of Justice League of New York journalism schools and will be recognizable to anyone who’s been following the future-of-news world in recent years: CUNY’s C.W. Anderson, Columbia’s Emily Bell, and NYU’s Clay Shirky.

It’s good! It aims to bring together a variety of threads around where news is headed — at the level
media 
november 2012 by JordanFurlong
A Vision for the Future of Newspapers—20 Years Ago - Recovering Journalist
I loaded PostCard onto my new PowerBook 140 (still a black and white screen) and brought it to work that Monday. “This is it!” Kaiser said excitedly when he saw it. "This is exactly what I was talking about in my memo." Within a couple days I essentially had a new job: as the Post's in-house digital media "futurologist," as Don Graham dubbed me.
publishers  media  future  it  innovation 
august 2012 by JordanFurlong
- How We Will Read: Clay Shirky
You can highlight or you can do something else to add your own words, and the fact that I don’t know what it’s called should tell you exactly how much I use it. When you go down to a secondhand bookstore, you’ll find books with notes in the margins. Someone will underline or highlight a passage, and then what do they write in the margin? “Important exclamation point!” There are these stories of books passing from hand-to-hand with annotations in them. That sense of a book as a repository for collective conversational wisdom is wonderful, but I don’t actually see it reflected in annotation patterns. It’s certainly not reflected in my own annotation patterns.
innovation  publishers  media 
april 2012 by JordanFurlong
The Atlantic: How One Magazine Became Profitable by Going 'Digital First'
The Atlantic, a monthly magazine on politics, foreign affairs, economics and culture, made $1.8 million in 2010, its first profitable year in decades. In October, digital ad revenues topped print for the first time, up 86% year-over-year, but not at the sacrifice of print. In fact, The Atlantic sold more print ads in October than it had in any other month since David Bradley acquired the title in 1999. Traffic to its three web properties — TheAtlantic.com, TheAtlanticWire.com and TheAtlanticCities.com — recently surpassed 11 million uniques per month, up a staggering 2500% since The Atlantic brought down its paywall in early 2008.
media  publishers  it 
december 2011 by JordanFurlong
‘Medical school model’ brings newspaper, radio station and university together | Poynter.
A newspaper, public radio station and university in Macon, Ga., are moving in together and sharing content, in a unique partnership aimed at strengthening local news reporting, thanks to a grant from the Knight Foundation being announced today.
admission  governance  innovation  media  schools 
december 2011 by JordanFurlong
Remember PR?: Basic Media Relations Could Be Your New “Secret Weapon” « Shatterbox
While your competitors are bogged down writing post after post for their own blog on recent circuit court decisions, trusting THIS will be the one to command an editor’s attention, you could be appearing on a local Fox affiliate’s morning show segment about estate planning, or contributing posts on family law issues to a mommy blogger site.
media  stem 
june 2010 by JordanFurlong
How to Save the News - Magazine - The Atlantic
Plummeting newspaper circulation, disappearing classified ads, “unbundling” of content—the list of what’s killing journalism is long. But high on that list, many would say, is Google, the biggest unbundler of them all. Now, having helped break the news business, the company wants to fix it—for commercial as well as civic reasons: if news organizations stop producing great journalism, says one Google executive, the search engine will no longer have interesting content to link to. So some of the smartest minds at the company are thinking about this, and working with publishers, and peering ahead to see what the future of journalism looks like. Guess what? It’s bright.
media 
may 2010 by JordanFurlong
Reporters read blogs and client alerts. Who knew? « The Legal Watercooler
Reporters read blogs and law firm client alerts. Who knew?? Actually, I did. As do most legal marketers who blog. But, most lawyers don’t believe us, so, take the word of Los Angeles Daily Journal editor David Houston:
stem  media  facebook 
april 2010 by JordanFurlong
News(paper) « BuzzMachine
Friend Michael Rosenblum forwarded word that the Star-Ledger in New Jersey was just nominated for seven local Emmys for its video work. Bravo for my old friends there and for Rosenblum, who trained them .
media 
february 2010 by JordanFurlong
The half-life of news « BuzzMachine
At a Yale conference a week ago, Thomson Reuters CEO Tom Glocer talked about the life cycle of the value of news in his business.

When a piece of financial news come out, it is at its most valuable for a very short time, he said. I asked him later how long that is. “Milliseconds,” he replied. Milliseconds. That’s as long as a computerized trader has to take advantage of news before the market knows it, before the news is knowledge and is thus commodified and loses its unique and timely value.
media 
february 2010 by JordanFurlong
So it’s called the iPad: Five thoughts on how it will (and won’t) change the game for news organizations » Nieman Journalism Lab
But for future-of-journalism junkies, the question was never whether or not Apple could come up with a sexy new device. The question was whether it could have an impact on the news business. Phrases like “save the news business” and “alter the economics and consumer attitudes of the digital era” have been tossed around an awful lot in the last few months.

So what did we learn today about how the iPad will impact journalism? Here are my first thoughts:
media 
january 2010 by JordanFurlong
No More Websites. Only Publishers. | Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Blog - By Mitch Joel at Twist Image
Websites are not websites anymore.

When a brand manager sits down to evaluate what she or he is doing online and in the mobile channels, the first realization they have is usually it's not up to snuff with the massive amount of online usage that consumers are engaged in. And, more often than not, they must also grapple with what their peers and competitors are doing in these spaces as well.
media 
january 2010 by JordanFurlong
Five Ways the iPad Will Change Magazine Design | New at Pentagram | Pentagram
The new iPad from Apple, presented in typical Steve Jobs fashion as game-changing, will, in fact, revolutionize the way we read magazines. Combining the rich visual content of a print publication, the ever-changing immediacy of a website, and the portability of an e-book reader, the iPad is something new.

Pentagram’s Luke Hayman, designer of, among others, Time, New York, and Travel + Leisure, was asked how this new format would change the world of magazines and came up with five ways off the top of his head.

A reversal of a decades-long trend
media  it 
january 2010 by JordanFurlong
The Hugh Cudlipp lecture: Does journalism exist? | Alan Rusbridger | Media | guardian.co.uk
Yet the most common question most editors are now asked is: "What's the business model?"

Of course, you know why people ask. Journalism may be facing a kind of existential threat. Whether you are a 22-year-old thinking about a career in journalism, or a 45-year-old wondering if your chosen calling will see you through to retirement, it's the question that nags away all the time. Insecurity is the condition of our journalistic age.
media 
january 2010 by JordanFurlong
Newspapers See the Appeal of a Local Web Gadget, SeeClickFix - NYTimes.com
Mr. Hardy decided to write a column based on issues that arose on the SeeClickFix widget, using either his own posts or compelling ideas from other users. Topics include long-delayed repairs to a bridge, which were completed after the article ran, and roads where dangerous speeding seemed to go unrestrained. Mr. Hardy is working on a project involving articles and video on eyesores in the area, including a dilapidated structure in Windsor, Conn., that is visible from Interstate 91.

“You look back at some of the stuff you’ve done over the years as a journalist, and you go, ‘I’ve written some important stories; no one ever called or wrote,’ ” Mr. Hardy said. “I’ve just gotten tons and tons of response to some of the stories I’ve written” using SeeClickFix.
media 
january 2010 by JordanFurlong
Open-source journalism - Salon.com
Open-source pragmatists believe that better software arises from the scrutiny inherent in the collaborative process. Will better journalism ensue if more reporters and editors beta test their own work? Hard to say -- in the deadline-crazed world of technology journalism, there's often hardly enough time to get a story properly copy edited and proofed, let alone reviewed by hundreds of frothing critics. Still, the principle is worth taking a long hard look at. There's an immense amount of expertise out there on the Net -- sites like Slashdot are pioneering new territory as they facilitate access to that knowledge, to the great and lasting benefit of us all.
media 
january 2010 by JordanFurlong
Should a Case Go Webwide? - Magazine - ABA Journal
Shortly after oral arguments before the Philadelphia-based 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, a marketer for the defense attorney launched a website dedicated to the wrongful-conviction appeal that included everything from court filings to information about the lawyer.

The site has received more than 3,400 visitors since April, showing how a case-specific website can help raise the profile of smaller firms, according to Richard Lavinthal, owner of PRforLaw, a Morrisville, Pa.-based legal media relations consulting firm. He developed the site for New York City solo attorney Timothy J. McInnis.
media  stem 
december 2009 by JordanFurlong
Media after the site « BuzzMachine
@stephenfry.

Spot on. Fry insinuated himself into my stream. He comes to us. We distribute him. He has been introduced to and acquired new fans. He now has a million followers, surely more than for any old web site of his. He did it by his wit(s) alone. His product is his ad, his readers his agency. How will he benefit? I have full faith that he of all people will find the way to turn this into a show and a book. He is media with no need for media. I was trying to avoid using Aston Kutcher as my example, but he’s on the cover of Fast Company making the same point: “He intends to become the first next-generation media mogul, using his own brand as a springboard…. ‘The algorithm is awesome,’ Kutcher says…”

That’s media post-media.
media 
december 2009 by JordanFurlong
Worthless readers « BuzzMachine
2. Context. I want to suggest abandoning the article for the constantly updated topic page (a la Wave). The problem with an article online is that it has a short half life and gathers few links and little ongoing attention and thus Googlejuice. It’s for this reason that Google’s Marissa Mayer has been advising publishers to move past the article to the topic. Abandoning the article for some living, breathing news beast yet to be defined may be a bit too radical for today’s publishers. So instead, I suggest, at least place the article into a space with broader context – archives, quotes, photos, links, discussion, wikified knowledge about the topic, feeds of updates; make the article a gateway to anything more you’d want on its subjects. Daylife (where I’m a partner) is working on something like that.
media  innovation 
november 2009 by JordanFurlong
Legal Blog Watch
ews reporters who cover litigation say lawyers are not particularly helpful when it comes to helping them understand the core issues in their cases. Plaintiffs lawyers, however, are more helpful than defense lawyers. Asked which side in a case is more helpful to them, not a single reporter said it was the defense.

These are among the findings of a survey of news reporters who cover the courts. It was conducted by a New York City communications consulting firm, Montieth & Company. The survey may not be particularly bankable, given that of 301 reporters queried, only 43 responded. They are mostly from the United States and work for a variety of print, digital and broadcast media.
media  stem 
october 2009 by JordanFurlong
Post-Medium Publishing
Publishers of all types, from news to music, are unhappy that consumers won't pay for content anymore. At least, that's how they see it. In fact consumers never really were paying for content, and publishers weren't really selling it either. If the content was what they were selling, why has the price of books or music or movies always depended mostly on the format? Why didn't better content cost more? [1]
Bookmarks  media  publishers 
september 2009 by JordanFurlong
Is journalism an industry? « BuzzMachine
ournalism is a business – that is how it is going to sustain itself; that is a key precept of the New Business Models for News Project. But is it still an industry dominated by companies and employment? In the first part of his analysis of the news business, BusinessWeek chief economist Michael Mandel equates bad news about news with the number of journalists employed. He charts newspaper jobs falling from more than 450,000 in 1990 to fewer than 300,000 today and calls that depressing – which it is, if one of those lost jobs is yours. But it could also signal new efficiency and productivity, no? Looking at these numbers with the cold eye of an economist whose magazine and job aren’t on the block, perhaps it is nothing more than the path of an industry in restructuring. Perhaps it’s actually a signal of opportunity. Indeed, Mandel then laid that chart atop one for the loss of jobs in manufacturing and found them sinking in parallel, with newspapers just a bit ahead on the downward slop
Bookmarks  media 
september 2009 by JordanFurlong
Content Doesn’t Matter Without the Package - Publishing 2.0
The challenge for media companies is not to figure out what to do with their content — content in and of itself doesn’t matter. It never has. It’s all about the package. Newspaper articles don’t matter without a newspaper. Magazine articles don’t matter without a magazine. TV shows don’t matter without a broadcast or cable channel. Newspapers’ inability to generate the same revenue online as in print has nothing to do with content. It’s because on the web they are no longer in the business of packaging content, and that’s what the newspaper business, like every other media business, has always been about. Instead, media companies put their content on the web and let search and other aggregators package it.
Bookmarks  media 
september 2009 by JordanFurlong
IDG TechNetwork : About Us : Press Releases
IDG TechNetwork Debuts Media Network for Marketers to Reach Audiences of Independent Technology Publishers FRAMINGHAM, MA – March 5, 2008 – Independent publishers looking to grow revenues and increase traffic but with limited resources now have an established business partner: IDG, the world’s largest technology media company. The IDG TechNetwork represents publishers to well-known technology marketers who trust IDG to place advertisements in appropriate sites. In return, publishers will receive a share of the revenue and gain valuable member benefits to help them grow their businesses.
Bookmarks  media  publishers 
september 2009 by JordanFurlong
Features : Google Fast Flip - Google News Help
Features: Google Fast Flip Print Google Fast Flip is a web application that lets users discover and share news articles. It combines qualities of print and the Web, with the ability to "flip" through pages online as quickly as flipping through a magazine. It also enables users to follow friends and topics, discover new content and create their own custom magazines around searches. Frequently Asked Questions How does it work? We capture images of the articles on our partners' websites and then display them in an easy-to-read way. The stories are grouped by categories, such as Entertainment, Business, Opinion, Politics and Most Viewed. Readers can flip through stories quickly by simply pressing the left- and right-arrow keys until they find one that catches their interest. Clicking on the story takes them directly to the publisher's website.
Bookmarks  media  publishers 
september 2009 by JordanFurlong
Two Stories from the Management Trap « The Scholarly Kitchen
So what separates the Business Week from SEED? Is it the paper? The ink? The editorial? All three are very good. The difference isn’t the magazines — it’s the owners. While two magazines await the scythe from the Grim Reaper, one is at a company that has over-invested in a losing proposition, lacked innovation, and created a cautious culture that has looks safe but is surprisingly risky. The other magazine is at a company that will only invest in print as long as it makes sense, is aggressively pursuing a digital strategy on many fronts, has a brand that isn’t tied to one medium, and has owners with “faster feet and bigger heads.” Ironically, but true to the theory of the management trap, that magazine isn’t Business Week.
Bookmarks  media  innovation  publishers 
august 2009 by JordanFurlong
Law.com - After Settlement in Amtrak Case, Opinions Erased From Lexis and Westlaw
Ordinarily, the decision to settle a case while an appeal is pending means giving up the opportunity to set a legal precedent as well as forgoing the chance to win a reversal of any unfavorable published decisions handed down by the lower court. But a team of defense lawyers fighting to overturn a $24 million verdict have figured out a way to have their settlement cake and eat their jurisprudence, too. The confidential settlement in Klein v. Amtrak -- a case in which two trespassing teenagers climbed atop a parked train car and suffered serious burns when they got too close to a 12,000-volt catenary wire -- included an unusual provision that called for the trial judge to vacate all of his published opinions and have them removed from Lexis and Westlaw. And it worked. A few months after holding an hourlong oral argument, the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals agreed in late July to remand the case to the trial judge, U.S. District Judge Lawrence F. Stengel, who, in turn, agreed to va
Bookmarks  media  publishers 
august 2009 by JordanFurlong
Freemium and Freeconomics
These numbers are similar enough to others that I have heard that I feel comfortable republishing them here. Facebook has 200mm+ monthly active users worldwide. Let's say they are doing $50mm per month in revenue. That's a revenue per monthly active user of $0.25. Low for sure, but enough to operate at breakeven. And I expect the self service ads and the virtual goods revenues to grow strongly in the next year, more than making up for the likely loss of some of the $150mm from the ad deal with Microsoft. And the next move for Facebook is to generate transaction revenues with its payment service and off site ad and transcation revenues from its Facebook Connect service. I'm pretty confident that Facebook can take its revenue per monthly active user to at least $0.50 and maybe higher in the coming years.
Bookmarks  facebook  media 
august 2009 by JordanFurlong
Chris and Malcolm are both wrong | Union Square Ventures: A New York Venture Capital Fund Focused on Early Stage & Startup Investing
Both sides of the debate about Free do not seem to acknowledge how fundamentally different the relationship between suppliers and consumers is on the web. Services are not offered for free at all. There is an exchange of value between users, the creators of the raw material - data, content, and meta-data, and the network where that data is converted into insight. This exchange is still governed by the basic laws of economics but the currency is not dollars, it's attention. The network that takes attention and converts it into insight is also quite different than a traditional firm. The services they provide are more like those we expect from a government than a company. Craigslist, Facebook, and Twitter all provide (or try to provide) a robust stable reliable infrastructure (hosting, bandwidth), security, safety, and dispute resolution. In all three cases, the product users create and consume emerges organically from this environment.
Bookmarks  media 
august 2009 by JordanFurlong
Editors' Blog: There's more to life than PEP (or let's get Travers off the naughty step)
Alex, very few people would actually contend that the legal media created the large-firm preoccupation with profit (and PEP in particular). But I do think the legal media has catered to that preoccupation to an unseemly and unhealthy degree. Periodicals serving the large-firm reader base spend a disproportionate amount of time and energy talking about how much money these lawyers make. What's more, they routinely associate profitability with quality, prestige and success, and they cast the failure to rank among the highest-profit firms as a failure of mission, if not character. When they issue rankings of law firms according to profitability, they become the news they're supposed to be covering -- and they encourage lawyers to indulge in the fantasy that a huge income (huger than your rivals' in particular) is the point of belonging to this profession. I'm not suggesting legal media should ignore the issue of profitability, or mount an anti-mammon campaign. But when we out-and-out ce
Bookmarks  firms  media  jf 
august 2009 by JordanFurlong
Media: National Public Radio's Digital Makeover | Newsweek Business | Newsweek.com
But the Times did get people to pay, right? We far exceeded our expectation—225,000 subscribers paid $50 a year, in addition to the home delivery subscribers, who got all of the Web for free. But guess what, that's $10 million. Instead of 225,000 who pay the $50, let's say it's one million subscribers. OK. That's $50 million a year. That's not going to save any newspaper. It's going to kill your advertising base. The numbers don't work
Bookmarks  media 
august 2009 by JordanFurlong
Journalists Are News Companies’ Most Valuable Asset - Publishing 2.0
Why did newspapers make so many newsroom cuts on their path back to profitability? Is it because they don’t recognize the value of their journalists? I think it’s because they are still wrestling with the declining value of their other major asset: industrial printing and distribution capacity, i.e. printing presses and delivery trucks and all their industrial staff. While some newspapers have made significant cuts to their industrial operation by not delivering or publishing everyday (and a few have taken the extreme step of ending their industrial operation entirely), most have protected this asset because it is not really variable — it’s mostly all or nothing. But to say that the value of industrial printing and distribution capacity is declining is not to say it has no value — it of course still generates most of newspaper company revenues. But the decline, while exacerbated to a large degree by the recession, is still secular long-term
Bookmarks  media 
july 2009 by JordanFurlong
Guest Post of sorts: Nicholas Lemann at Columbia Journalism School Graduation « Clay Shirky
My generation was raised to think that journalism worked this way: owning a newspaper, especially a big-city newspaper, was a “public trust.” So was owning a local television station, and for that matter a television network. (Alex Jones and Susan Tifft’s 1999 biography of The New York Times is simply and grandly called “The Trust,” for example.) We assumed that news organizations were naturally very profitable; the idea of them as a public trust meant that their owners had an obligation to operate them at a handsome, but less than maximal, profit, so that they could fund newsrooms filled with dogged, independent journalists who would report on public affairs, at home and abroad. Although the word “public” in “public trust” implies a quasi-governmental function, we did not mean that government should have anything to do with news organizations. They should be insulated from the state and from politics. We preferred that family dynasties own newspapers—this was an oddly feudal vision o
Bookmarks  media 
july 2009 by JordanFurlong
Journalistic narcissism « BuzzMachine
he realization of that myth – the myth of necessity – hit me head-on when I read an unselfconsciously narcissistic feature in The New York Times this week about the room where the 4 p.m. news meeting is held. Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger has likened that meeting to a “religious ceremony.” The Times feature certainly acted as if it were taking us inside the Pope’s chapel: “The table was formidable: oval and elegant, with curves of gleaming wood. The editors no less so: 11 men and 7 women with the power to decide what was important in the world.” Behold the hubris of that: They decide what is important. Because we can’t. That’s what it says. That’s what they believe.
Bookmarks  media 
july 2009 by JordanFurlong
Stephen Baker - The Numerati
That "reader" is more than 900,000 different people who subscribe to or buy the magazine every week, plus the people they share it with. It's also the millions of people who visit the Web site, where all these stories appear (along with other, less polished fare). So when we try to read the mind of the reader, we're playing a numbers game. I might calculate that 45% of the readers will be interested in my slightly geeky paragraph about algorithms, that another 25% won't hold it against us (I should know about this stuff...). Yes, others will no doubt skip over it, discouraged, and turn the page, if they've even gotten that far. But on balance, it's still a valuable paragraph. Another editor might view the readership differently and call for the section to be removed. But some of our most important readers, I might argue, will really care about that information. On and on...
Bookmarks  publishers  media 
july 2009 by JordanFurlong
Legal Technology - Watch What You Say to New Media
ig Brother is watching. Any unfortunate comment by an attorney can be caught in the blizzard of new media devices and can spell disaster for a case. Here is a primer of what attorneys should watch for and how to overcome instincts that could turn an attorney into a victim. Case in point: A capable reporter was working on a special report about the death of a child due to negligence. The case made national headlines. The plaintiff's attorney spent days going over the details of the case with the reporter. He introduced him to expert witnesses and provided analogous material from other cases across the nation. The reporter's intent was sincere -- it was a public safety issue about which he felt passionate. And yet, when a major network aired the coverage, the facts were distorted, the sound bites irrelevant, the crucial information missing and the entire presentation mangled. What went wrong?
Bookmarks  business  media 
july 2009 by JordanFurlong
Cody Brown - Batch vs. Real Time Processing, Print vs. Online Journalism: Why the Best Web News Brands Will Never Look Like The New York Times
It’s possible for a news website to work (and even do decently) without playing to the unique real time characteristics of the web medium just as it’s possible for Tech Crunch to print out its articles and throw them into a small-circ industry newspaper. The challenge is in branding. The New York Times is powerful because whatever falls under its logo has an immediate effect of seeming true. This is its biggest asset, and what it has spent the past century painstakingly building. The problem with branding the news product over the news process is that its readers see the NYT’s like this:
Bookmarks  media 
june 2009 by JordanFurlong
Adding value in the new news ecosystem « BuzzMachine
I’ve also been arguing that for journalists, saying what you don’t know is becoming as important as saying what you know. That is all the more critical as misinformation and rumor can spread at the speed of information online. So I imagine a news organization creating a kind of anti-wiki – a dynamic, collaborative Snopes: a list of what we don’t know so we can see what is unconfirmed and so these things can be confirmed – so journalists can add journalism.
Bookmarks  media  quote 
june 2009 by JordanFurlong
Media Coverage of Major NYC Bar/Vault Legal Careers Panel is Unbalanced | legalresearchandwritingpro.com
Like commenter #73, I’m disappointed that the Times has chosen to focus almost exclusively on the content of the first of four panels that took place yesterday - the panel entitled Breaking Back Into BIGLAW: How to Make Your Way Back Into a Top Law Firm. Perhaps I shouldn’t be disappointed, as the Times (like the New York Law Journal) often focuses on the world of BigLaw almost to the exclusion of other lawyers in the city—not to mention the state and country: in a 2000 statistical survey, the American Bar Foundation found that 48% of lawyers were solo practitioners and another 15% worked in firms with 2-5 lawyers, while only 18% worked in firms with 51 or more lawyers (http://www.abanet.org/marketresearch/resource.html#Demographics). In the panel about the rise of solo and mid-sized law firms, Ron Geffner, a partner in Sadis & Goldberg, LLP, explained that his 28-lawyer firm—which is one of the top firms in the country in his practice area—has not laid off anyone, has no debt, and is
Bookmarks  solo  media 
june 2009 by JordanFurlong
Law And More: Media Default, MSM & Alternate: BigLaw Focus
The story is no longer BigLaw. Sure, some brilliant players like Jones Day will be providing breakthrough legal work as well as the model for how to operate the business of law. Overall, though, as Richard Susskind argues in "The End of Lawyers?" a paradigm shift has shifted the focus. Trend watchers now observe or should observe the game-changers such as legal services as a commodity vs. craft, ongoing impacts of technology, demands for more cost-control, reduction of manpower needs, regionalism of service provision, and end of lifetime employment. Yet, media such as the mainstream THE NEW YORK TIMES and the alternative Abovethelaw.com still default into coverage of BigLaw. Attorney Lisa Solomon, who presented at Tuesday's New York City Bar's Career Event, points that out in her comment to THE NEW YORK TIMES regarding its coverage of the event. Her observations are getting a lot of attention, including pick up by WSJ.COM. She presents data such as 48% of lawyers are solo practi
Bookmarks  media  firms 
june 2009 by JordanFurlong
MediaPost Publications Printer Friendly
Brill insisted that publishers can easily convince at least 10% of their monthly visitors to pay subscription fees, while maintaining the vast majority of their non-paid traffic. Brill has also hired antitrust lawyer David Boies to help publishers negotiate better terms with Amazon. "How can Amazon be extracting 70% of subscription fees and controlling the consumer relationship?" Brill asked. Rather, Amazon should make its money by selling Kindle devices, and leave the subscription fees to the publishers. "It's like if Sony told HBO that it wants 70% of what people pay for its content because people watch it on a Sony television."
Bookmarks  media 
june 2009 by JordanFurlong
bizjournals: About bizjournals
bizjournals is the online media division of American City Business Journals, the nation's largest publisher of metropolitan business newspapers. It operates the Web sites for each of the company's 40 print business journals and operates a web-only site with local business news and information for Los Angeles. The national bizjournals site features local business news from around the nation, updated throughout the day, top business stories from American City's print editions, industry-specific news from more than 40 industries, advice columns, and a full menu of tools to help business owners and operators manage their businesses more successfully. There's also easy navigation to each of the 42 local business sites.
Bookmarks  media 
june 2009 by JordanFurlong
Virtual Lee’s Just Sayin’ » Random Thoughts & the Nature of Truth
echnology wasn’t new in it’s influences on the arts. Think about the change from the camera in the 19th century to the projector in the 20th. The camera framed objects, alluded to three dimensions, stilled time. The projector blasted synthesis - one frame negating another and at eye blinking speed. We may think of blogging as the result of another technological frontier not unlike the camera and the projector. A newspaper by its very nature stills time; states the fact wrapped in the eternity of print - it is a moment of truth stilled. A blog is more akin to the projector: the movement itself. Recording the changes of truth over time. Revisionist, processing, excluding and incorporating. But what of the truth the blog seeks? In art that truth is the thing that is coming into being, it is intertwined with the perceivor. When we discuss in blogs the movement from rumor to not rumor,when one moment’s truth collides with the next, what is the truth? Where does it end? When does it bec
Bookmarks  media 
june 2009 by JordanFurlong
Google Wave and news « BuzzMachine
magine a team of reporters - together with witnesses on the scene - able to contribute photos and news to the same Wave (formerly known as a story or a page). One can write up what is known; a witness can add facts from the scene and photos; an editor or reader can ask questions. And it is all contained under a single address - a permalink for the story - that is constantly updated from a collaborative team. Here, I speculated about the topic becoming the new atomic unit of news, supplanting the article with wikis that contained a snapshot of what we know now, blogs that treat news as the process it is, links (do what you do best, link to the rest), discussion, and media of all types, some even live (Twitter, Qik.com). Marissa Mayer also gave journalists advice on the new form of news, telling them they needed to maintain updates under a permalink for the story so it could be searched and found. Wav
Bookmarks  media 
june 2009 by JordanFurlong
Shirky: Problem is filter failure, not info overload | The Open Road - CNET News
didn't attend the Web 2.0 Expo in New York last year, and so the exceptional keynote speech of Clay Shirky, a New York University new-media professor, writer, and consultant on the social and economic effects of Internet technologies. The keynote, "It's not information overload. It's filter failure," is an insightful exploration of Internet economics and an intelligent response to Nick Carr's "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" argument. If you haven't watched it, you must. It does more to explain the dearth of effective information filters that we wade through today. It has application to open source (180,000-plus projects on SourceForge, but which are useful?), but far broader implications.
Bookmarks  innovation  media  it 
may 2009 by JordanFurlong
What is link journalism? | Publish2
Link journalism is linking to reporting or sources on the web to enhance, complement, or add more context to original reporting. Link journalism can also be a topical news aggregation, with links to interesting and important stories from any source on the web. Read more about link journalism:
Bookmarks  media 
may 2009 by JordanFurlong
Rough Type: Nicholas Carr's Blog: The New York Real Times
Yesterday, it was the New York Times that took the realtime plunge with the launch of Times Wire, a jittery twittery service that the paper describes as "a continuously updated stream of the latest stories and blog posts." The news scroll updates every minute, as fresh stories flicker into consciousness and old ones flicker out. Times Wire doesn't just give the Gray Lady a facelift; it jabs an IV into the ashen flesh of her forearm and hooks her up to a Red Bull drip bag. It's Times Wired.
Bookmarks  media 
may 2009 by JordanFurlong
Bill's blog
A reporter at one of our newspapers asked me if we were doing enough to combat Google and the threat it poses to newspapers and publishers generally. To tell you the truth, I'm not that worried about Google right now. Much of our content is behind a pay wall where Google can't see it. And for the content outside the pay wall, I'm happy to have Google send us traffic. But the social networks terrify me. Not because of the torrents of information they represent, or because they have developed killer business models. But because they compete with us for the time and attention of our readers and advertisers. And for that reason alone, I think we need to gear up to fight back.
Bookmarks  media  facebook 
may 2009 by JordanFurlong
Bill's blog
er a note I received on the subject from our PR consultant, Lee Feldman, the Grace Case also makes me wonder whether there's an opportunity to connect with law school/j-school students to work on similar projects for us around the country. That would be one way to both extend our coverage beyond our usual geographic boundaries, and build relationships with future readers and/or staff. Because when it comes to the future of our journalism we need to be thinking out-of-the-box and beyond the usual restrictions.
Bookmarks  schools  innovation  media 
may 2009 by JordanFurlong
NewBizNews: Paid content models « BuzzMachine
In the New Business Models for News Project at CUNY, we will be fleshing out three kinds of business models to start: * hyperlocal from the local perspective; * a news ecosystem that comes after a metro paper; * and paid content. We will be joined by business analysts who’ll be making the models. But to make them work, we need much information and many perspectives.
Bookmarks  media 
april 2009 by JordanFurlong
Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable « Clay Shirky
Round and round this goes, with the people committed to saving newspapers demanding to know “If the old model is broken, what will work in its place?” To which the answer is: Nothing. Nothing will work. There is no general model for newspapers to replace the one the internet just broke. With the old economics destroyed, organizational forms perfected for industrial production have to be replaced with structures optimized for digital data. It makes increasingly less sense even to talk about a publishing industry, because the core problem publishing solves — the incredible difficulty, complexity, and expense of making something available to the public — has stopped being a problem.
Bookmarks  publishers  media  innovation 
april 2009 by JordanFurlong
Judge Harvie Wilkinson on the Demise of American Journalism - Law Blog - WSJ
There are pros and cons to the changing media landscape, and I do not pretend to know what assets and debits the future media mix will bring. But this I do know—that the First Amendment should never countenance the gamble that informed scrutiny of the workings of government will be left to wither on the vine. That scrutiny is impossible without some assistance from inside sources such as Michael Andrew. Indeed, it may be more important than ever that such sources carry the story to the reporter, because there are, sad to say, fewer shoeleather journalists to ferret the story out.
Bookmarks  media  access 
april 2009 by JordanFurlong
Jay Rosen: "He Said, She Said" Journalism: Are We Done With That Yet?
Quick definition: "He said, she said" journalism means... * There's a public dispute. * The dispute makes news. * No real attempt is made to assess clashing truth claims in the story, even though they are in some sense the reason for the story. (Under the "conflict makes news" test.) * The means for assessment do exist, so it's possible to exert a factual check on some of the claims, but for whatever reason the report declines to make use of them. * The symmetry of two sides making opposite claims puts the reporter in the middle between polarized extremes. When these five conditions are met, the genre is in gear
Bookmarks  media 
april 2009 by JordanFurlong
Advertising - Magazines Blur Line Between Ad and Article - NYTimes.com
f the separation between magazines’ editorial and advertising sides was once a gulf, it is now diminished to the size of a sidewalk crack. Skip to next paragraph Enlarge This Image Magazines’ approaches have included ESPN the Magazine’s fold-out flap, top, and Esquire’s mix-and-match cover with well-known faces, bottom. Recent issues of Entertainment Weekly, Esquire, Time, People, ESPN the Magazine, Scholastic Parent & Child and other magazines have woven in advertisers in new ways, some going as far as putting ads on their covers.
Bookmarks  media  publishers 
april 2009 by JordanFurlong
How Google Stole Control Over Content Distribution By Stealing Links - Publishing 2.0
There is so much misunderstanding flying around about the economics of content on the web and the role of Google in the web’s content economy that it’s making my head hurt. So let’s see if we can straighten things out. Google isn’t stealing content from newspapers and other media companies. It’s stealing their control over distribution, which has always been the engine of profits in media. Google makes more money than any other media company on the web because it has near monopoly control over content distribution (i.e. like a metro newspaper in the pre web era
Bookmarks  media 
april 2009 by JordanFurlong
Out of the Jungle: The Globe on the Ropes!
Lastly, on this Saturday, April 4, after using the Boston Globe, as so often in the past, to post to this blog, I am still in shock to tell OOTJ readers that the big headlines today are that the New York Times Company, which has ownership of the Globe, threatens to shut the Globe unless its many unions agree to $20 million in concessions. The Times is hurting, and sees the Globe bleeding red ink, hemorrhaging money.
Bookmarks  media 
april 2009 by JordanFurlong
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: