JordanFurlong + firms + competence   2

Junior Lawyers Are Going Extinct And Nobody Knows What To Do About It | Above the Law
Professor John Flood of Griffith University in Queensland, Australia also sees this danger. In a new academic paper titled, “Legal Professionals of the Future: Their Ethos, Role and Skills,” he writes:

The effect of automation here could be dramatic in that if junior associates were to be gradually culled from firms, the entire reproduction of the legal profession could be jeopardised since law firms are structured around associates being promoted to partnership…

Exactly. Sooner rather than later, firms are going to slow their junior hiring and focus on a narrower range of candidates. Unfortunately, the path to building a great lawyer is a pyramid scheme and it’s harder to guarantee good results when there are less bodies in the system getting tested for their professional acumen.

Moreover, screwing up the most basic tasks is a critical part of becoming a well-seasoned attorney. What happens when we lose those tasks to throw at a first-year? What replaces that hands-on education?

Legal Cheek cites a Law Society study that estimates:

Over the longer term, the number of jobs in the legal services sector will be increasingly affected by automation of legal services functions. This could mean that by 2038 total employment in the sector could be 20% less than it would otherwise have been, with a loss of 78,000 jobs — equal to 67,000 full-time equivalent jobs — compared to if productivity growth continued at its current rate.

Gloom and doom over unemployment is usually misplaced. Jobs tend to just get shifted — more firm lawyers become freelance attorneys or join non-traditional legal services companies, for example. But if the training regime for young lawyers isn’t addressed, the population of competent attorneys to fill these new gigs will simply dry up.

Firms and law schools need to start taking this challenge seriously because life comes at you fast, and the profession could face its existential crisis sooner than folks realize.
firms  laterals  training  competence  schools 
january 2019 by JordanFurlong
Empirical Research on the Core Competencies Needed to Practice Law: What Do Clients, New Lawyers, and Legal Employers Tell Us? by Neil W. Hamilton :: SSRN
Key stakeholders in legal services, legal education, and the professional regulation of lawyers are asking the following question: What are the core competencies needed for a new lawyer to practice law effectively and successfully? Since the focus of professions like law, medicine, the clergy, and the professorate is to provide assistance at a high level of commitment and professional competence to the person served (client, patient, parishioner, and student), a good place to start in answering this question would be to examine empirical research on what core competencies are needed by the person served. This article summarizes some of the empirical data available to answer this question.
competence  schools  admission  training  firms 
november 2015 by JordanFurlong

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: