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Speaking while exercising? Not if you want to get fitter - The Globe and Mail
The Queen’s researchers have a surprisingly simple suggestion, which they tested in a separate experiment: “We also found that prescribing exercise at an intensity where participants could not speak comfortably resulted in consistently high blood lactate responses,” Bonafiglia said.

This approach, known as the Talk Test, involved asking participants to count to 30 at “a regular conversational pace and volume” while cycling. If they could do it comfortably, they were asked to speed up slightly until it began to get difficult.

And that’s pretty much it.

In an age of pervasive fitness technology and self-monitoring, there’s some irony in the triumph of mere conversation as a more sensitive barometer of exercise intensity than the expensive gold-standard laboratory approach. But it’s also a reminder of an unvarnished truth that athletes have always known: To get fitter, you have to work hard, no matter what your wearable tech tells you.
exercise  training  health  humanbody  research 
8 weeks ago by Aetles
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