Social Media Marathon Cheating: Con or Victimless Crime? | WIRED
Kara Bonneau had trained for months to run the 2014 Boston Marathon, one of the sport’s premier events.
Read 
5 hours ago
Checklists are boring, but death is worse | Harvard Gazette
Doctors and nurses operate amid a blizzard of new information that can save the lives of people who not long ago would have died. The challenge? Keeping it all straight.
Read 
yesterday
The Anti-Normcore, Anti-Basics Minimalism of A.P.C. | The New Yorker
When the word “normcore” became a household term, in 2014, nobody was as displeased as Jean Touitou, the founder of the French clothing brand A.P.C.
Read 
yesterday
The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia
News Analysis With Loss of Its Caliphate, ISIS May Return to Guerrilla Roots By MARGARET COKER, ERIC SCHMITT and RUKMINI CALLIMACHI With the fall of its de facto capital and its territory shriveled to a handful of outposts, the Islamic State may be reeling but it is not vanquished, experts say.
Read 
yesterday
Anthony Bourdain Urges Americans To 'Value The Things We Eat' : The Salt : NPR
One-third of all the food produced each year for human consumption is never eaten. That adds up to about 1.3 billion tons of waste per year. That unappetizing fact is the inspiration for a new documentary, Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, which was released on Oct. 13 in theaters and on demand.
Read 
yesterday
Where the Fires in Northern California Came From, and What Lies Ahead | The New Yorker
Since the fires in Northern California began, on a dry and windy night two weekends ago, they have charred nearly a quarter of a million acres of land, destroyed an estimated fifty-seven hundred structures, and killed more than forty people.
Read 
yesterday
Donald Trump and the Wrecking-Ball Presidency | The New Yorker
Once , when America was still very great, Presidents tended to be builders: they built things like the Interstate Highway System, which began, in 1956, under Dwight D.
Read 
yesterday
Stress-Testing American Democracy: Nine Months of President Trump | The New Yorker
On Friday, Donald Trump will have been in the Oval Office for nine months. In some ways, it feels like it’s been longer. (Can you remember life before Trump tweets?) And it’s become harder to step back from the daily madness and consider what Trump’s record means for the U.S. and its future.
Read 
2 days ago
Use Two-Factor Authentication with Apple ID and iCloud
Apple lets you tie in an Apple ID for several purposes in iOS: for iCloud synchronization, iCloud Drive, App Store purchases, iMessage, and more.
Read 
4 days ago
20 of America's top political scientists gathered to discuss our democracy. They're scared. - Vox
Is American democracy in decline? Should we be worried? On October 6, some of America’s top political scientists gathered at Yale University to answer these questions. And nearly everyone agreed: American democracy is eroding on multiple fronts — socially, culturally, and economically.
Read 
4 days ago
302 Found
Five years can seem like a long time. Two presidential elections and three iPhone generations ago, things were different. And that’s when we started Medium. At the time, I wrote: Looking back at these words, it’s clear that some things haven’t changed. Like why we’re here.
Read 
4 days ago
www.oprah.com
Sometimes, I think I'm falling apart. Then, I talk to my friends. One spent a whole winter getting a babysitter for her toddler daughter in the middle of the day and then used the time to go to the movies and cry.
Read 
4 days ago
The Fate of Earth | The New Yorker
Yesterday evening, at Manhattan’s New School, the New Yorker staff writer Elizabeth Kolbert delivered the second annual Jonathan Schell Memorial Lecture on the Fate of the Earth, an event established by the Nation Institute in honor of the late Jonathan Schell, a longtime New Yorker staff writer,
Read 
7 days ago
What Do We Do with Our Dead?  | The New Yorker
P. T. Barnum’s first exhibit was a blind, crooked, and shrivelled old woman, a hundred and sixty-one years old, and his second was her dissection, conducted in an amphitheatre on Broadway in front of more than a thousand New Yorkers, who paid fifty cents each to see her get cut up.
Read 
9 days ago
The Secrecy Undermining the Senate Intelligence Committee’s Russia Probe | The New Yorker
On Wednesday, Richard Burr and Mark Warner, the two leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee, the body that is widely considered to be the most likely to produce a bipartisan report about Russia and Donald Trump, gave a press briefing on their work.
Read 
10 days ago
Kazuo Ishiguro, the New Nobel Laureate, Has Supremely Done His Own Kind of Thing | The New Yorker
I hoped that the Albanian writer Ismail Kadare would win this year’s Nobel Prize in Literature—but, then, I hope that every year. Kazuo Ishiguro’s en-Nobelment is a surprise; I wonder how many readers had thought of him as a likely contender.
Read 
10 days ago
The Error in Baseball and the Moral Dimension to American Life | The New Yorker
The error in baseball is a unique phenomenon in sports—a judgment of the quality of play that makes no difference to the outcome. No other sport, not even a close cousin like cricket, has anything like it.
Read 
10 days ago
How Ta-Nehisi Coates Gives Whiteness Power - The New York Times
BERLIN — In the study of German history, there is the notion of sonderweg, literally the “special path,” down which the German people are fated to wander. In different eras, and depending on who employed it, the term could imply different things.
Read 
13 days ago
Starlings | SmokeLong Quarterly
My therapist Leo says, “So how are the warts?” and I look down at my hand, the three little discs of salicylic acid on my pinky and ring finger, and tell him the medicine’s working, they’re slowly melting away. I tell him it’s my hip that’s been bothering me.
Read 
14 days ago
The Las Vegas Shooting and the Search for Meaning | The New Yorker
“I’d love to help you guys,” Eric Paddock told the reporters who gathered on Monday outside his house in Orlando, Florida, just hours after his brother, Stephen Paddock, massacred more than fifty people on the Las Vegas Strip. “There’s nothing.
Read 
14 days ago
The Las Vegas Shooter’s Accessories | The New Yorker
Three days after Sunday’s mass shooting in Las Vegas, there is increasing certainty about which weapons the gunman, Stephen Paddock, used to kill nearly sixty people and wound hundreds more.
Read 
14 days ago
How Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump, Jr., Avoided a Criminal Indictment | The New Yorker
This article is a collaboration between The New Yorker, ProPublica, and WNYC. In the spring of 2012, Donald Trump’s two eldest children, Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump, Jr., found themselves in a precarious legal position.
Read 
14 days ago
The Republican Party Isn’t Cracking Up. It’s Getting Even Stronger. | New Republic
Roy Moore’s victory in Alabama’s Republican primary last week puts him in position to become the state’s next junior senator and also a major embarrassment to the GOP.
Read 
15 days ago
The 2017 Nobel prize in medicine celebrates the tiny clocks in us all - Vox
Three American scientists have won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for their discoveries of the microscopic biological machinery that controls the circadian rhythm, or the 24-hour body clock.
Read 
15 days ago
The new reality of old age in America - Washington Post
Richard Dever had swabbed the campground shower stalls and emptied 20 garbage cans, and now he climbed slowly onto a John Deere mower to cut a couple acres of grass.
Read 
18 days ago
How Fake News Turned a Small Town Upside Down - The New York Times
On a Tuesday morning in June 2016, Nathan Brown, a reporter for The Times-News, the local paper in Twin Falls, Idaho, strolled into the office and cleared off a spot for his coffee cup amid the documents and notebooks piled on his desk.
Read 
23 days ago
Is Health Care a Right? | The New Yorker
Is health care a right? The United States remains the only developed country in the world unable to come to agreement on an answer. Earlier this year, I was visiting Athens, Ohio, the town in the Appalachian foothills where I grew up.
Read 
24 days ago
TRUMP VOTERS AND ECONOMIC GRIEVANCES (IT'S THE MEDIA, STUPID) - Niskanen Center
One of the most popular explanations of Donald Trump’s electoral victory is that the white working class, victimized by Rust Belt de-industrialization, rallied to his calls for repudiating free-trade deals such as NAFTA and the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership; for restricting immigration; and
Read 
27 days ago
Scorched-Earth Politics: Bernie Sanders and the Dishonest Campaign that Gave Us Trump
So began Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders in his inaugural speech as a candidate for the Democratic nomination for president. It was an exceedingly sunny day on April 30, 2015, as a gaggle of reporters crowded around a makeshift stage set up on a shaded stone plaza outside Capitol Hill.
Read 
28 days ago
Can Our Democracy Survive Tribalism?
From time to time, I’ve wondered what it must be like to live in a truly tribal society. Watching Iraq or Syria these past few years, you get curious about how the collective mind can come so undone.
Read 
29 days ago
The Book That Taught Me What I Want to Teach My Daughter | The New Yorker
Long before I had my daughter, I began collecting the books I thought would be important to our life together: “Goodnight Moon” and “Eloise” and “Frog and Toad” and “Owl at Home” and “Mouse Soup.
Read 
4 weeks ago
Hillary Clinton Looks Back in Anger | The New Yorker
Hillary Rodham Clinton, who, as she puts it, won “more votes for President than any white man” in American history, is not the first candidate to capture the popular vote but lose the election. She is the fifth. The Founders, for varying reasons, distrusted popular democracy.
Read 
5 weeks ago
Questions for Me About Dying | The New Yorker
A few months back, I was invited to take part in a program for ABC television called “You Can’t Ask That.” The premise of the show is that there are taboo subjects about which it is difficult to have an open and honest conversation, death being one of them.
Read 
5 weeks ago
Anthony Bourdain’s Moveable Feast | The New Yorker
When the President of the United States travels outside the country, he brings his own car with him.
Read 
5 weeks ago
The National’s Beautiful Claustrophobia | The New Yorker
Plenty of bands address the extravagance and the ferocity of youth, but far fewer sing about being grownup.
Read 
6 weeks ago
Reading the LMS against the Backdrop of Critical Pedagogy, Part One – OFFICE OF DIGITAL LEARNING
“Education, which must never be neutral, can be at the service either of decision, of world transformation and of critical insertion within the world, or of immobility and the possible permanence of unjust structures, of human beings’ settling for a reality seen as untouchable.
Read 
6 weeks ago
Now Is the Time to Talk About What We Are Actually Talking About | The New Yorker
America has always been aspirational to me. Even when I chafed at its hypocrisies, it somehow always seemed sure, a nation that knew what it was doing, refreshingly free of that anything-can-happen existential uncertainty so familiar to developing nations. But no longer.
Read 
6 weeks ago
Martha Nussbaum’s Moral Philosophies | The New Yorker
Martha Nussbaum was preparing to give a lecture at Trinity College, Dublin, in April, 1992, when she learned that her mother was dying in a hospital in Philadelphia. She couldn’t get a flight until the next day.
Read 
6 weeks ago
Robert Mueller’s Lines of Attack Are Getting Clearer | Vanity Fair
Robert Mueller is not ending the summer with a tan. The 73-year-old special counsel leading the sprawling Department of Justice investigation into alleged ties between President Donald Trump and Russia is keeping the same grueling hours he did a decade ago as director of the F.B.I.
Read 
6 weeks ago
Centrism: A Moderate Manifesto - Quillette
Turning and turning in the widening gyre The falcon cannot hear the falconer; Things fall apart; the center cannot hold; W. B. Yeats Centrism.
Read 
6 weeks ago
Hurricane Harvey, and Public and Private Disaster in Houston | The New Yorker
When Houston floods, it turns into a locked circular labyrinth. The city, my home town, is laid out like a wagon wheel: downtown sits at the center, surrounded by three concentric circles, which are bisected by highways in every direction.
Read 
7 weeks ago
The New Front in the Gerrymandering Wars: Democracy vs. Math - The New York Times
In the late spring of 2011, Dale Schultz walked the short block in Madison from his State Senate office in the Wisconsin Capitol to the glass-­paneled building of Michael Best & Friedrich, a law firm with deep ties to his Republican Party.
Read 
7 weeks ago
Miranda July on the Wild Contradictions of Marriage | The New Yorker
You mentioned that your short story “The Metal Bowl” was partly inspired by the work of the Austrian artist Friedl Kubelka. How so?
Read 
7 weeks ago
Will Trump Be the Death of the Goldwater Rule? | The New Yorker
A strange consensus does appear to be forming around Trump’s mental state.
Read 
7 weeks ago
What Are Trump’s Advisers Saying Behind Closed Doors? | The New Yorker
Someday , when all that’s been happening has receded into the semi-distant past, historians may be able to answer a fascinating question: What were the people who worked for Donald Trump, the nation’s forty-fifth President, really saying to one another?It’s no secret that some of those people
Read 
7 weeks ago
Donald Trump’s True Allegiances | The New Yorker
Early last November, just before Election Day, Barack Obama was driven through the crisp late-night gloom of the outskirts of Charlotte, as he barnstormed North Carolina on behalf of Hillary Clinton. He was in no measure serene or confident.
Read 
7 weeks ago
My Friend Kim Wall | The New Yorker
The Swedish journalist Kim Wall was a rush of positive energy, a force so alive that it always felt good simply to be around her.
Read 
8 weeks ago
Snoozers Are, in Fact, Losers | The New Yorker
On a typical workday morning, if you’re like most people, you don’t wake up naturally. Instead, the ring of an alarm clock probably jerks you out of sleep.
Read 
8 weeks ago
How to Raise a Feminist Son - The New York Times
In her new book, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the Nigerian-born author, gives instructions for raising a feminist daughter. But how can we raise feminist sons? Model healthy problem-solving at home.
Read 
8 weeks ago
Is Anybody Home at Ben Carson’s HUD?
This story is a collaboration between New York and ProPublica, an independent nonprofit newsroom. In mid-May, Steve Preston, who served as the secretary of Housing and Urban Development in the final two years of the George W.
Read 
8 weeks ago
Why Obama Should Lead the Opposition to Trump | The New Yorker
The crisis that erupted last week in Charlottesville is simply an extension of the one that began last summer, when the Republican Party, instead of opposing Donald Trump, decided to go all in on his side.
Read 
8 weeks ago
Presidential Election 2016: An American Tragedy | The New Yorker
The election of Donald Trump to the Presidency is nothing less than a tragedy for the American republic, a tragedy for the Constitution, and a triumph for the forces, at home and abroad, of nativism, authoritarianism, misogyny, and racism.
Read 
9 weeks ago
Chelsea Manning Changed the Course of History. Now She’s Focusing on Herself - Vogue
One hot, humid early-summer evening in New York, a hired car slows on Bleecker Street, and a young woman inside prepares for her first party out in years. She is wearing a midnight-colored semiformal dress by Altuzarra and Everlane ankle boots with heels.
Read 
9 weeks ago
Is America Headed for a New Kind of Civil War? | The New Yorker
A day after the brawling and racist brutality and deaths in Virginia, Governor Terry McAuliffe asked, “How did we get to this place?” The more relevant question after Charlottesville—and other deadly episodes in Ferguson, Charleston, Dallas, Saint Paul, Baltimore, Baton Rouge, and Alexandria
Read 
9 weeks ago
The Moral History of Air-Conditioning - The Atlantic
Cooling the air was once seen as sinful. Maybe the idea wasn’t entirely wrong. An Object Lesson.
Read 
9 weeks ago
Aziz Ansari on Quitting the Internet, Loneliness, and Season 3 of Master of None | GQ
He's early. I'm not sure how early he got to Au Passage, a restaurant serving small plates (Aziz's choice) that's tucked away on a graffiti-riddled street in central Paris. But he beat me—and I was early. I found him leaning on a wall, alone.
Read 
9 weeks ago
My Greatest Gig | The New Yorker
From the upcoming meta-“memoir” “Based on a True Story,” to be published by Spiegel & Grau. It was 1985 and I was a young man who’d done stand­up for only a year and I was driving to a gig, all by myself. The gig was doing comedy at a hospital, for the patients.
Read 
10 weeks ago
An interview with Michael Lopp | Louder Than Ten
Since early 2002, Michael Lopp has been writing about management, the tech industry, and corporate culture under his pen name and alter ego: Rands, which has grown into one of the internet’s most thoughtful and articulate voices on managing humans in the workplace.
Read 
10 weeks ago
Dirtbagging | Tracksmith
says Stephan Shay, a 62 minute half-marathoner and 2:16 marathoner who lives full-time out of his van, a renovated 1966 Clark Cortez. The van, which he calls Lolita, is painted a vintage shade of Volkswagen Green and outfitted with birds of paradise patterned curtains.
Read 
10 weeks ago
Good People | The New Yorker
They were up on a picnic table at that park by the lake, by the edge of the lake, with part of a downed tree in the shallows half hidden by the bank. Lane A. Dean, Jr., and his girlfriend, both in bluejeans and button-up shirts.
Read 
10 weeks ago
Averting Apocalypse – Daniel Pinchbeck – Medium
A few weeks ago, New York Magazine published a devastatingly apocalyptic overview of climate predictions. We are on target for a 4 to 8 degrees Celsius warmer climate by 2100, at current rates of CO2 emissions.
Read 
10 weeks ago
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? - The Atlantic
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas.
Read 
10 weeks ago
Under Trump, Coal Mining Gets New Life on U.S. Lands - The New York Times
DECKER, Mont. — The Trump administration is wading into one of the oldest and most contentious debates in the West by encouraging more coal mining on lands owned by the federal government.
Read 
10 weeks ago
The Universe Doesn’t Care About Your ‘Purpose’ - The New York Times
Keys in hand, I took a deep breath. I flipped the ignition and the memories of my Papa rushed back, just as the familiar rumble of his Thunderbird kicked in. After a series of painful events in late 2016, I struggled to understand how almost everything around me went wrong so suddenly.
Read 
11 weeks ago
Why the Scariest Nuclear Threat May Be Coming from Inside the White House | Vanity Fair
On the morning after the election, November 9, 2016, the people who ran the U.S. Department of Energy turned up in their offices and waited. They had cleared 30 desks and freed up 30 parking spaces.
Read 
11 weeks ago
Literary Style and the Lessons of Memoir | The New Yorker
In his book “Memoir: An Introduction,” from 2011, the scholar G. Thomas Couser argues that we go to the genre not so much for detail or style as for “wisdom and self-knowledge,” for what the main character, who is always the author, has learned. Sometimes, though, the style is the lesson.
Read 
11 weeks ago
The Rise of the Thought Leader | New Republic
Writing in one of Mussolini’s prisons in the 1930s, the Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci jotted down the fragments that would become his theory of intellectuals.
Read 
12 weeks ago
The World of Internet Dating and Mating | The New Yorker
In the fall of 1964, on a visit to the World’s Fair, in Queens, Lewis Altfest, a twenty-five-year-old accountant, came upon an open-air display called the Parker Pen Pavilion, where a giant computer clicked and whirred at the job of selecting foreign pen pals for curious pavilion visitors.
Read 
12 weeks ago
The Minds of Psychopaths | The New Yorker
The Western New Mexico Correctional Facility sits in high-desert country about seventy miles west of Albuquerque. Grants, a former uranium boomtown that depends heavily on prison work, is a few miles down the road.
Read 
12 weeks ago
What the Layoffs Look Like at the Carrier Plant Trump Said He’d Save | The New Yorker
On February 10, 2016, the Carrier Corporation, an H.V.A.C. company founded in 1915, announced that it would be closing plants in Indianapolis and Huntington, Indiana, and moving to Monterrey, Mexico.
Read 
july 2017
Climate Change Is Killing Us Right Now | New Republic
A young, fit U.S. soldier is marching in a Middle Eastern desert, under a blazing summer sun. He’s wearing insulated clothing and lugging more than 100 pounds of gear, and thus sweating profusely as his body attempts to regulate the heat.
Read 
july 2017
Trump’s Clueless Abdication of Presidential Responsibility | The New Yorker
Has there ever been a more cynical surrender of Presidential authority? The editorial board of the Washington Post posed this question on Tuesday, after Donald Trump reacted to the collapse of the Senate health-care-reform bill by suggesting, in a tweet, that his fellow-Republicans should now “let
Read 
july 2017
The Election And The Ash Borer - The Rumpus.net
We saw the white spray paint Xs months ago, marking the reptilian bark of ash trees across the city. The Xs signified which trees had become infected with the Emerald Ash Borer. The borer is a cancer diagnosis in the form of an insect.
Read 
july 2017
A Love Story | The New Yorker
Audio: Samantha Hunt reads. A wild dog with a tender baby in its jaws disappearing into the redwoods forever. My uncle’s so good at imagining things, he makes them real. “Yeah. It’s just what he does, a habit.” Or a compulsion.
Read 
july 2017
Please Prove You’re Not a Robot - The New York Times
When science fiction writers first imagined robot invasions, the idea was that bots would become smart and powerful enough to take over the world by force, whether on their own or as directed by some evildoer. In reality, something only slightly less scary is happening.
Read 
july 2017
How Do We Contend With Trump’s Defiance of ‘Norms’? - The New York Times
If there was anything a teenager in America could count on, just a few years ago, it was that she could stand up and ask a question at a political event without fear that a future president would try to grind her into chum. It didn’t take long for our last campaign to change that.
Read 
july 2017
The Scholar | The New Yorker
Few American college students in the mid-nineteen-nineties showed as much promise as Rachel Hall. In 1994, Glamour named her one of its Top 10 College Women.
Read 
july 2017
« earlier      
archive backpacking baseball books camping clothing death eclipse family gear gift gyst magazine new obama planning read scissors smithrock toget toread uniform uniforms warm will yorker

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: