Mimi O’Donnell Reflects on the Loss of Philip Seymour Hoffman and the Devastation of Addiction - Vogue
The first time I met Phil, there was instant chemistry between us. It was the spring of 1999, and he was interviewing me to be the costume designer for a play he was directing—his first—for the Labyrinth Theater Company, In Arabia We’d All Be Kings.
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2 days ago
Remembering Acharya Bach, the ‘last Asian composer’ of Western classical music
Was Johann Sebastian Bach Western classical music’s “last Asian composer”? The question was raised in Bombay in March 1985 at a seminar celebrating the 300th anniversary of the birth of the great German composer. The seminar focused on one of Bach’s final works, the famous Art of the Fugue.
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2 days ago
Memories of Gefilte Fish | The New Yorker
Gefilte fish is not an everyday dish; it is to be eaten mainly on the Jewish Sabbath in Orthodox households, when cooking is not allowed.
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3 days ago
“The Lazy River” | The New Yorker
We’re submerged, all of us. You, me, the children, our friends, their children, everybody else. Sometimes we get out: for lunch, to read or to tan, never for very long. Then we all climb back into the metaphor. The Lazy River is a circle, it is wet, it has an artificial current.
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3 days ago
www.newyorker.com
The philosopher Jerry Fodor was important for the same reason you’ve probably never heard of him: he was unimpressed, to put it politely, by the intellectual trends of the day. His focus was the philosophy of the mind, and he regarded much of what went on in brain labs as make-work.
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3 days ago
Watching the Alabama Senate Race Between Roy Moore and Doug Jones | The New Yorker
The document laying out George Papadopoulos’s guilty plea is, by its own admission, only a partial account of what the special counsel Robert Mueller and his team know about Papadopoulos’s actions.
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3 days ago
How Trust Shapes Nations' Safety Rules - The Atlantic
How does a country decide what risks are acceptable in everyday life? When I moved to China nearly two years ago, one of the first things I bought was a bicycle.
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5 days ago
Don’t Stop the Presses! When Local News Struggles, Democracy Withers | WIRED
Thomas Peele’s friend keeps bugging him. “Are you going to win?” the friend writes over Facebook. “I think you’re going to win.” “What are you going to do when you win?” “Shut up,” Peele thinks. He’s an old-school watchdog reporter. Blue eyes that bore into you.
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10 days ago
Michael Flynn’s Guilty Plea Sends Donald Trump’s Lawyers Scrambling | The New Yorker
Last June, less than a month after President Donald Trump fired James Comey, the director of the F.B.I., the Senate Intelligence Committee convened to hear Comey’s testimony about a bizarre series of conversations he’d had with Trump.
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14 days ago
Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds | The New Yorker
In 1975, researchers at Stanford invited a group of undergraduates to take part in a study about suicide. They were presented with pairs of suicide notes. In each pair, one note had been composed by a random individual, the other by a person who had subsequently taken his own life.
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15 days ago
The Self-Destruction of American Democracy - The New York Times
President Trump has single-handedly done more to undermine the basic tenets of American democracy than any foreign agent or foreign propaganda campaign could. So if Putin backed him, and if he did it to damage the United States, then he dropped one extremely smart bomb in the middle of Washington.
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16 days ago
Where Millennials Come From | The New Yorker
Imagine, as I often do, that our world were to end tomorrow, and that alien researchers many years in the future were tasked with reconstructing the demise of civilization from the news.
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19 days ago
The Women I’m Thankful For - The New York Times
As a way of avoiding the news, I have been spending the past few weeks cleaning out my basement. It’s my least favorite room of the house, repository of everything that’s broken or unnecessary or depressing.
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19 days ago
America’s Future Is Texas | The New Yorker
When Frederick Law Olmsted passed through Texas, in 1853, he became besotted with the majesty of the Texas legislature.
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20 days ago
The Root of All Cruelty? | The New Yorker
A recent episode of the dystopian television series “Black Mirror” begins with a soldier hunting down and killing hideous humanoids called roaches.
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22 days ago
Patients and Prisoners | News | The Pacific Northwest Inlander | News, Politics, Music, Calendar, Events in Spokane, Coeur d'Alene and the Inland Northwest
They found Phillip Paul three days later, on a Sunday afternoon, walking toward a two-lane country road in Goldendale, Wash., 10 miles or so from the Oregon border. He had emerged from the brush, red-faced and weary, with a backpack and an acoustic guitar slung over his shoulders.
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22 days ago
Rachel Maddow: Trump’s TV Nemesis | The New Yorker
In Rachel Maddow’s office at the MSNBC studios, there is a rack on which hang about thirty elegant women’s jackets in various shades of black and gray.
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25 days ago
A Husband, a Wife, a Time Bomb | The New Yorker
On Friday, September 9, 1949, at 10:25 A.M., an eastbound Canadian Pacific Airline DC-3 left Ancienne Lorette, the airport of Quebec, on a scheduled run more or less following the course of the St. Lawrence River.
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27 days ago
The Republican Tax Strategy: Speed, Subterfuge, and Diversion | The New Yorker
It is entirely conceivable that, in two weeks’ time, the Republican Party’s leaders will have largely succeeded in railroading through Congress an unpopular, regressive, and damaging tax reform. That was their plan from the beginning, and so far it has worked out much as they intended.
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29 days ago
When Does a Watershed Become a Sex Panic? | The New Yorker
Idols are falling so fast that it’s hard to keep track. The Times has produced a growing tally of twenty-three men who have lost jobs, deals, film roles, and more in the last five weeks as a result of sexual-assault or harassment accusations.
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4 weeks ago
BlueWater Dream of the Great Below – Invironment – Medium
I awoke with a start. I had fallen asleep slumped against my favorite leaning poplar a ten-minute walk from the house. I was most certainly not exactly there now.
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4 weeks ago
Creamy Pasta With Smoked Bacon and Peas Recipe - NYT Cooking
This elegant riff on a childhood favorite came to The Times in 2009 by way of Jamie Oliver, the British chef and cookbook author.
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4 weeks ago
Cacio e Pepe Recipe - NYT Cooking
It is among the most basic, simplest pastas there is, and suddenly trendy to boot. Why? Because when made right, it is incredible.
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4 weeks ago
Pasta With Lemon, Herbs and Ricotta Salata Recipe - NYT Cooking
Here's a light, brothy pasta with chicken stock, lemon zest, mint and ricotta salata that Amanda Hesser brought to The Times in 2001. It's easy yet elegant; perfect for a impromptu weeknight dinner party.
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4 weeks ago
Frank Rich: What Comes After Trump Could Be More Dangerous
For many, if not most, Americans, the only pleasure to be had from Donald Trump’s presidency is to imagine his premature eviction from the White House. Impeachment, the 25th Amendment, pick your poison.
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4 weeks ago
The Weinstein Moment and the Trump Presidency | The New Yorker
In 1975, Susan Brownmiller published a startling and controversial volume in the literature of feminism. It was called “Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape.
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4 weeks ago
How One Las Vegas ED Saved Hundreds of Lives After the Worst Mass Shooting in U.S. History - Emergency Physicians Monthly
The night that Stephen Paddock opened fire on thousands of people at a Las Vegas country music concert, nearby Sunrise Hospital received more than 200 penetrating gunshot wound victims. Dr.
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4 weeks ago
Joe Biden Talks About His New Memoir, ‘Promise Me, Dad’ - The New York Times
Joe Biden’s new memoir, “Promise Me, Dad,” is all about time — but not its sweep or fullness. Instead he has written about the fearsome ticktock of seconds, minutes and hours when our backs are against the wall, and there are obstacles to be faced.
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4 weeks ago
The Only Thing I Envy Men | The New Yorker
I have often, in the past decade or so, wanted to write something about “women writers,” whatever that means (and whatever “about” means), but the words “women writers” seemed already to carry their own derogation, and I found the words slightly nauseating, in a way that reminded me of t
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4 weeks ago
Washington Monthly | The Democrats Confront Monopoly
On a Monday afternoon in late July, a group of leading Democratic members of Congress, including Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, and Elizabeth Warren, gathered in small-town Berryville, Virginia, to pitch the Democrats’ “Better Deal” economic agenda.
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4 weeks ago
The Dangerous Acceptance of Donald Trump | The New Yorker
“Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, / As, to be hated, needs but to be seen,” the poet Alexander Pope wrote, in lines that were once, as they said back in the day, imprinted on the mind of every schoolboy.
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5 weeks ago
The Childless and the Parentless | The New Yorker
The first child whose life I tried to make a difference in was Maricela. She was twelve years old and in the sixth grade at a middle school in the San Gabriel Valley, about a half hour’s drive from my house, near downtown Los Angeles.
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5 weeks ago
A Secret History of the Pissing Figure in Art | The New Yorker
Look at “Saint Luke Drawing the Virgin,” a fifteenth-century portrait by Rogier van der Weyden, and you’ll notice two figures in the middle distance, lingering at the crenellations in the courtyard. One gestures in faint surprise; somebody has captured their attention.
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5 weeks ago
Is Tom Cotton the Future of Trumpism? | The New Yorker
If you believed the national media, the week of the annual Republican Party fund-raising dinner, in Fort Smith, Arkansas, in late August, was one of the worst of Donald Trump’s Presidency.
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5 weeks ago
Harvey Weinstein’s Army of Spies | The New Yorker
In the fall of 2016, Harvey Weinstein set out to suppress allegations that he had sexually harassed or assaulted numerous women. He began to hire private security agencies to collect information on the women and the journalists trying to expose the allegations.
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5 weeks ago
Battleground America | The New Yorker
Just after seven-thirty on the morning of February 27th, a seventeen-year-old boy named T. J. Lane walked into the cafeteria at Chardon High School, about thirty miles outside Cleveland.
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5 weeks ago
The Papadopoulos Plea Deal and the Great Blowhard Convergence of the 2016 Election | The New Yorker
Among Monday’s many revelations, the most interesting reading came in the form of George Papadopoulos’s plea deal.
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5 weeks ago
What Does Tulsi Gabbard Believe? | The New Yorker
When Tulsi Gabbard arrived at Lihue Airport, on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, she was greeted with a lei made of vibrant plumeria flowers, a small bottle of coconut water, a bagful of mangoes, and a profusion of alerts on her phone.
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5 weeks ago
Big data meets Big Brother as China moves to rate its citizens | WIRED UK
On June 14, 2014, the State Council of China published an ominous-sounding document called "Planning Outline for the Construction of a Social Credit System". In the way of Chinese policy documents, it was a lengthy and rather dry affair, but it contained a radical idea.
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6 weeks ago
Why is Mueller’s team homing in on Paul Manafort? I asked a former federal prosecutor. - Vox
Donald Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort turned himself in on Monday morning to face charges as part of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia.
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6 weeks ago
The double life of the “respectable” men who harass women - Vox
The actor Stephen Collins once fondled me at an awards ceremony. It’s true. Almost 30 years ago, when I was a theater critic at the New Yorker, I had my butt fondled by Stephen Collins at the Drama Desk Awards.
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6 weeks ago
‘I Forgot My PIN’: An Epic Tale of Losing $30,000 in Bitcoin | WIRED
In January 2016, I spent $3,000 to buy 7.4 bitcoins. At the time, it seemed an entirely worthwhile thing to do.
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6 weeks ago
The Work You Do, the Person You Are | The New Yorker
All I had to do for the two dollars was clean Her house for a few hours after school.
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6 weeks ago
On Christopher Robin, War, and P.T.S.D. | The New Yorker
Named by my parents after Christopher Robin, I’ve been a lifelong Pooh-ologist. I memorized A. A. Milne’s “Vespers”—an enchanting little poem about his son’s bedtime prayers—as a tot decades ago. I can recite it still.
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6 weeks ago
Should I Reveal That My Dad Pretended to Be a Vietnam Vet? - The New York Times
When he was alive, my father sometimes talked of his military service during the Vietnam War. He would oscillate between being open about details and not wanting to speak of his experience.
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6 weeks ago
The Most Revealing Moment in the New Joan Didion Documentary | The New Yorker
About a third of the way through “The Center Will Not Hold,” Griffin Dunne’s intimate, affectionate, and partial portrait of his aunt Joan Didion, which premières on Netflix this week, a riveting moment occurs.
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6 weeks ago
The Family That Built an Empire of Pain | The New Yorker
The north wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art is a vast, airy enclosure featuring a banked wall of glass and the Temple of Dendur, a sandstone monument that was constructed beside the Nile two millennia ago and transported to the Met, brick by brick, as a gift from the Egyptian government.
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7 weeks ago
The Daily 202: The GOP civil war is bigger than Trump. A new study shows deep fissures on policy. - The Washington Post
THE BIG IDEA: Republican leaders are trying to downplay the significance of Jeff Flake’s retirement speech by insisting that the party is unified and that critiques of President Trump are entirely about his personality — not his policies. Asked for reaction to what both Flake and Sen.
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7 weeks ago
The Joy of Not Wearing a Bra | The New Yorker
Late one morning, in a house in Peru’s Sacred Valley, my friend Louisa asked me why I wore a bra. We were standing in our rented kitchen, boiling water for tea. I had on, below my T-shirt, a specialty underwire brassiere with the adjustable straps drawn tight and two full DDD cups.
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7 weeks ago
Who Knew Trump Would Be a Weak President? | New Republic
At his rallies, presidential candidate Donald Trump excited his most avid supporters through displays of toughness: his calls when a demonstrator acted up to “get him out of here”; his incantations of his reality show signature “You’re fired”; his promises of robust actions on “Day One.
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7 weeks ago
A Few Theories About Why James Comey Might Call Himself “Reinhold Niebuhr” on Twitter | The New Yorker
James B. Comey, the F.B.I. director, keeps a document from the bureau’s archives on his desk, like a memento mori. It’s the application that his predecessor, J. Edgar Hoover, made to the Justice Department to wiretap the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
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7 weeks ago
What We’re Reading This Week | The New Yorker
During my final season of high-school soccer, I mostly played center forward on the varsity team. But I seldom acted how I imagined a center forward should: serving as a target man up front or lurking amid the opponent’s backline.
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7 weeks ago
Cub Scout Is Exiled After Pressing Legislator on Guns and Race - The New York Times
When a group of Cub Scouts met with a Colorado state senator this month, they asked her about some of the most controversial topics in the nation: gun control, the environment, race and the proposed border wall between the United States and Mexico.
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7 weeks ago
Chris Christie's Last Fight | GQ
This wasn’t how he figured it would end. A year after being steamrolled by Donald Trump, Chris Christie is hobbling out of office as the most unpopular governor in the history of New Jersey—a casualty of scandal and hubris, and a guy freed up to quietly pursue the toughest job of his life.
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7 weeks ago
The Story That “Only the Brave” Leaves Out | The New Yorker
The art of storytelling is treacherous, and the new film “Only the Brave,” released last Friday, is among the more noteworthy recent displays of the art’s peculiarities and pitfalls.
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7 weeks ago
Myeshia Johnson Stands Up to Donald Trump | The New Yorker
There were two moments during her interview on “Good Morning America” when the expression of the face of Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Sergeant La David Johnson, was transformed by a sudden smile.
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7 weeks ago
On Safari in Trump's America - The Atlantic
The country’s elites are desperate to figure out what they got wrong in 2016. But can they handle the truth? It was the hippies who drove Nancy Hale over the edge. She had spent three days listening respectfully to the real people of Middle America, and finally she couldn’t take it any longer.
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7 weeks ago
Seeing David Bowie in 1972 | The New Yorker
In England, David Bowie may become—may already be—a real star, but in the American context he looks more like an aesthete using stardom as a metaphor. I’m not entirely happy with this conclusion; it seems almost ungrateful.
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7 weeks ago
The Secretive Family Making Billions From the Opioid Crisis
The newly installed Sackler Courtyard at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum is one of the most glittering places in the developed world. Eleven thousand white porcelain tiles, inlaid like a shattered backgammon board, cover a surface the size of six tennis courts.
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7 weeks ago
How Fiction Becomes Fact on Social Media - The New York Times
Hours after the Las Vegas massacre, Travis McKinney’s Facebook feed was hit with a scattershot of conspiracy theories. The police were lying. There were multiple shooters in the hotel, not just one. The sheriff was covering for casino owners to preserve their business.
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8 weeks ago
Death at a Penn State Fraternity - The Atlantic
Tim Piazza fought for his life for 12 hours before his Beta Theta Pi brothers called 911. By then, it was too late. At about 3 p.m. on Friday, February 3, Tim Piazza, a sophomore at Penn State University, arrived at Hershey Medical Center by helicopter.
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8 weeks ago
Social Media Marathon Cheating: Con or Victimless Crime? | WIRED
Kara Bonneau had trained for months to run the 2014 Boston Marathon, one of the sport’s premier events.
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8 weeks ago
Checklists are boring, but death is worse | Harvard Gazette
Doctors and nurses operate amid a blizzard of new information that can save the lives of people who not long ago would have died. The challenge? Keeping it all straight.
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8 weeks ago
The Anti-Normcore, Anti-Basics Minimalism of A.P.C. | The New Yorker
When the word “normcore” became a household term, in 2014, nobody was as displeased as Jean Touitou, the founder of the French clothing brand A.P.C.
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8 weeks ago
The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia
News Analysis With Loss of Its Caliphate, ISIS May Return to Guerrilla Roots By MARGARET COKER, ERIC SCHMITT and RUKMINI CALLIMACHI With the fall of its de facto capital and its territory shriveled to a handful of outposts, the Islamic State may be reeling but it is not vanquished, experts say.
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8 weeks ago
Anthony Bourdain Urges Americans To 'Value The Things We Eat' : The Salt : NPR
One-third of all the food produced each year for human consumption is never eaten. That adds up to about 1.3 billion tons of waste per year. That unappetizing fact is the inspiration for a new documentary, Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, which was released on Oct. 13 in theaters and on demand.
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8 weeks ago
Where the Fires in Northern California Came From, and What Lies Ahead | The New Yorker
Since the fires in Northern California began, on a dry and windy night two weekends ago, they have charred nearly a quarter of a million acres of land, destroyed an estimated fifty-seven hundred structures, and killed more than forty people.
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8 weeks ago
Donald Trump and the Wrecking-Ball Presidency | The New Yorker
Once , when America was still very great, Presidents tended to be builders: they built things like the Interstate Highway System, which began, in 1956, under Dwight D.
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8 weeks ago
Stress-Testing American Democracy: Nine Months of President Trump | The New Yorker
On Friday, Donald Trump will have been in the Oval Office for nine months. In some ways, it feels like it’s been longer. (Can you remember life before Trump tweets?) And it’s become harder to step back from the daily madness and consider what Trump’s record means for the U.S. and its future.
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8 weeks ago
Use Two-Factor Authentication with Apple ID and iCloud
Apple lets you tie in an Apple ID for several purposes in iOS: for iCloud synchronization, iCloud Drive, App Store purchases, iMessage, and more.
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8 weeks ago
302 Found
Five years can seem like a long time. Two presidential elections and three iPhone generations ago, things were different. And that’s when we started Medium. At the time, I wrote: Looking back at these words, it’s clear that some things haven’t changed. Like why we’re here.
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8 weeks ago
20 of America's top political scientists gathered to discuss our democracy. They're scared. - Vox
Is American democracy in decline? Should we be worried? On October 6, some of America’s top political scientists gathered at Yale University to answer these questions. And nearly everyone agreed: American democracy is eroding on multiple fronts — socially, culturally, and economically.
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8 weeks ago
www.oprah.com
Sometimes, I think I'm falling apart. Then, I talk to my friends. One spent a whole winter getting a babysitter for her toddler daughter in the middle of the day and then used the time to go to the movies and cry.
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8 weeks ago
The Fate of Earth | The New Yorker
Yesterday evening, at Manhattan’s New School, the New Yorker staff writer Elizabeth Kolbert delivered the second annual Jonathan Schell Memorial Lecture on the Fate of the Earth, an event established by the Nation Institute in honor of the late Jonathan Schell, a longtime New Yorker staff writer,
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9 weeks ago
What Do We Do with Our Dead?  | The New Yorker
P. T. Barnum’s first exhibit was a blind, crooked, and shrivelled old woman, a hundred and sixty-one years old, and his second was her dissection, conducted in an amphitheatre on Broadway in front of more than a thousand New Yorkers, who paid fifty cents each to see her get cut up.
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9 weeks ago
The Secrecy Undermining the Senate Intelligence Committee’s Russia Probe | The New Yorker
On Wednesday, Richard Burr and Mark Warner, the two leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee, the body that is widely considered to be the most likely to produce a bipartisan report about Russia and Donald Trump, gave a press briefing on their work.
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9 weeks ago
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