Presidential Election 2016: An American Tragedy | The New Yorker
The election of Donald Trump to the Presidency is nothing less than a tragedy for the American republic, a tragedy for the Constitution, and a triumph for the forces, at home and abroad, of nativism, authoritarianism, misogyny, and racism.
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13 hours ago
Chelsea Manning Changed the Course of History. Now She’s Focusing on Herself - Vogue
One hot, humid early-summer evening in New York, a hired car slows on Bleecker Street, and a young woman inside prepares for her first party out in years. She is wearing a midnight-colored semiformal dress by Altuzarra and Everlane ankle boots with heels.
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2 days ago
Is America Headed for a New Kind of Civil War? | The New Yorker
A day after the brawling and racist brutality and deaths in Virginia, Governor Terry McAuliffe asked, “How did we get to this place?” The more relevant question after Charlottesville—and other deadly episodes in Ferguson, Charleston, Dallas, Saint Paul, Baltimore, Baton Rouge, and Alexandria
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2 days ago
The Moral History of Air-Conditioning - The Atlantic
Cooling the air was once seen as sinful. Maybe the idea wasn’t entirely wrong. An Object Lesson.
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2 days ago
Aziz Ansari on Quitting the Internet, Loneliness, and Season 3 of Master of None | GQ
He's early. I'm not sure how early he got to Au Passage, a restaurant serving small plates (Aziz's choice) that's tucked away on a graffiti-riddled street in central Paris. But he beat me—and I was early. I found him leaning on a wall, alone.
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3 days ago
My Greatest Gig | The New Yorker
From the upcoming meta-“memoir” “Based on a True Story,” to be published by Spiegel & Grau. It was 1985 and I was a young man who’d done stand­up for only a year and I was driving to a gig, all by myself. The gig was doing comedy at a hospital, for the patients.
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8 days ago
An interview with Michael Lopp | Louder Than Ten
Since early 2002, Michael Lopp has been writing about management, the tech industry, and corporate culture under his pen name and alter ego: Rands, which has grown into one of the internet’s most thoughtful and articulate voices on managing humans in the workplace.
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8 days ago
Dirtbagging | Tracksmith
says Stephan Shay, a 62 minute half-marathoner and 2:16 marathoner who lives full-time out of his van, a renovated 1966 Clark Cortez. The van, which he calls Lolita, is painted a vintage shade of Volkswagen Green and outfitted with birds of paradise patterned curtains.
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8 days ago
Good People | The New Yorker
They were up on a picnic table at that park by the lake, by the edge of the lake, with part of a downed tree in the shallows half hidden by the bank. Lane A. Dean, Jr., and his girlfriend, both in bluejeans and button-up shirts.
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8 days ago
Averting Apocalypse – Daniel Pinchbeck – Medium
A few weeks ago, New York Magazine published a devastatingly apocalyptic overview of climate predictions. We are on target for a 4 to 8 degrees Celsius warmer climate by 2100, at current rates of CO2 emissions.
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9 days ago
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? - The Atlantic
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas.
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9 days ago
Under Trump, Coal Mining Gets New Life on U.S. Lands - The New York Times
DECKER, Mont. — The Trump administration is wading into one of the oldest and most contentious debates in the West by encouraging more coal mining on lands owned by the federal government.
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11 days ago
The Universe Doesn’t Care About Your ‘Purpose’ - The New York Times
Keys in hand, I took a deep breath. I flipped the ignition and the memories of my Papa rushed back, just as the familiar rumble of his Thunderbird kicked in. After a series of painful events in late 2016, I struggled to understand how almost everything around me went wrong so suddenly.
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17 days ago
Why the Scariest Nuclear Threat May Be Coming from Inside the White House | Vanity Fair
On the morning after the election, November 9, 2016, the people who ran the U.S. Department of Energy turned up in their offices and waited. They had cleared 30 desks and freed up 30 parking spaces.
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17 days ago
Literary Style and the Lessons of Memoir | The New Yorker
In his book “Memoir: An Introduction,” from 2011, the scholar G. Thomas Couser argues that we go to the genre not so much for detail or style as for “wisdom and self-knowledge,” for what the main character, who is always the author, has learned. Sometimes, though, the style is the lesson.
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17 days ago
The Rise of the Thought Leader | New Republic
Writing in one of Mussolini’s prisons in the 1930s, the Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci jotted down the fragments that would become his theory of intellectuals.
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24 days ago
The World of Internet Dating and Mating | The New Yorker
In the fall of 1964, on a visit to the World’s Fair, in Queens, Lewis Altfest, a twenty-five-year-old accountant, came upon an open-air display called the Parker Pen Pavilion, where a giant computer clicked and whirred at the job of selecting foreign pen pals for curious pavilion visitors.
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25 days ago
The Minds of Psychopaths | The New Yorker
The Western New Mexico Correctional Facility sits in high-desert country about seventy miles west of Albuquerque. Grants, a former uranium boomtown that depends heavily on prison work, is a few miles down the road.
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26 days ago
What the Layoffs Look Like at the Carrier Plant Trump Said He’d Save | The New Yorker
On February 10, 2016, the Carrier Corporation, an H.V.A.C. company founded in 1915, announced that it would be closing plants in Indianapolis and Huntington, Indiana, and moving to Monterrey, Mexico.
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27 days ago
Climate Change Is Killing Us Right Now | New Republic
A young, fit U.S. soldier is marching in a Middle Eastern desert, under a blazing summer sun. He’s wearing insulated clothing and lugging more than 100 pounds of gear, and thus sweating profusely as his body attempts to regulate the heat.
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27 days ago
Trump’s Clueless Abdication of Presidential Responsibility | The New Yorker
Has there ever been a more cynical surrender of Presidential authority? The editorial board of the Washington Post posed this question on Tuesday, after Donald Trump reacted to the collapse of the Senate health-care-reform bill by suggesting, in a tweet, that his fellow-Republicans should now “let
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28 days ago
The Election And The Ash Borer - The Rumpus.net
We saw the white spray paint Xs months ago, marking the reptilian bark of ash trees across the city. The Xs signified which trees had become infected with the Emerald Ash Borer. The borer is a cancer diagnosis in the form of an insect.
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4 weeks ago
A Love Story | The New Yorker
Audio: Samantha Hunt reads. A wild dog with a tender baby in its jaws disappearing into the redwoods forever. My uncle’s so good at imagining things, he makes them real. “Yeah. It’s just what he does, a habit.” Or a compulsion.
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4 weeks ago
How Do We Contend With Trump’s Defiance of ‘Norms’? - The New York Times
If there was anything a teenager in America could count on, just a few years ago, it was that she could stand up and ask a question at a political event without fear that a future president would try to grind her into chum. It didn’t take long for our last campaign to change that.
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4 weeks ago
Please Prove You’re Not a Robot - The New York Times
When science fiction writers first imagined robot invasions, the idea was that bots would become smart and powerful enough to take over the world by force, whether on their own or as directed by some evildoer. In reality, something only slightly less scary is happening.
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4 weeks ago
The Scholar | The New Yorker
Few American college students in the mid-nineteen-nineties showed as much promise as Rachel Hall. In 1994, Glamour named her one of its Top 10 College Women.
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4 weeks ago
Trump’s Russian Laundromat | New Republic
In 1984, a Russian émigré named David Bogatin went shopping for apartments in New York City. The 38-year-old had arrived in America seven years before, with just $3 in his pocket.
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5 weeks ago
The Exciting Life and Lonely Death of a Basketball Vagabond - The New York Times
Sitting on a park bench overlooking Lake Ontario in Toronto on a brilliant summer day in 2015, I was approached by a woman looking for directions.
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5 weeks ago
Trump administration: There's no evidence of collusion. 12 legal experts: Yes, there is. - Vox
On Tuesday morning, Donald Trump Jr. posted an email chain from last June in which he agreed to a meeting with a “Russian government lawyer” named Natalia Veselnitskaya who supposedly had damaging information about Hillary Clinton. The emails confirm that not only did Trump Jr.
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5 weeks ago
U2 Plays “The Joshua Tree”: Outside, It’s America | The New Yorker
Love for a band, like love for a person, can move in mysterious ways. Rarely, in my experience, do you love a band with your whole heart for a decade and then turn away sharply, never to return, but that’s what happened to me with U2.
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5 weeks ago
These Men Can’t Do Home Repair. And They’re Fine With That. - The New York Times
At least he tried. Some years back, Eric Feldman, a law professor at the University of Pennsylvania, decided to take care of an annoying problem in his Philadelphia condominium: an outdated shower and bath valve that controlled both the temperature and the water pressure.
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5 weeks ago
When Will Climate Change Make the Earth Too Hot For Humans?
Peering beyond scientific reticence. It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible, even within the lifetime of a teenager today.
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5 weeks ago
The Work You Do, the Person You Are - The New Yorker
All I had to do for the two dollars was clean Her house for a few hours after school.
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5 weeks ago
Attack of the Republican Decepticons - The New York Times
Does anyone remember the “reformicons”? A couple of years back there was much talk about a new generation of Republicans who would, it was claimed, move their party off its cruel and mindless agenda of tax cuts for the rich
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5 weeks ago
The Radical Origins of Christianity | The New Yorker
Kierkegaard relates a chilling parable in “The Sickness Unto Death.” An emperor summons a poor day laborer. The man never dreamed that the emperor even knew of his existence.
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5 weeks ago
Fine, I’ll Drink More Water | The New Yorker
Today, March 22nd, is World Water Day—held annually to increase the awareness of freshwater’s importance in all aspects of life. Unlike billions of people around the world, I have the luxury of taking safe, clean water for granted.
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5 weeks ago
What Amazon’s Purchase of Whole Foods Really Means | The New Yorker
Last week, two days before announcing that it would be acquiring Whole Foods, Amazon released a short promotional video for a new product called the Dash Wand. The Wand is a candy-bar-size gizmo that costs twenty dollars.
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5 weeks ago
Seattle cyclist dies in Oregon crash | The Seattle Times
REDMOND, Ore. (AP) — Authorities say a 32-year-old Seattle woman was killed in a bicycle crash near Redmond, Oregon. KOMO-TV reports (http://j.mp/2sOOytk ) 32-year-old Katie Jenks was discovered by passing motorists Wednesday morning near Borden Beck Wildlife Preserve.
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6 weeks ago
What Tom Perriello’s Loss in Virginia Can Teach Democrats | The New Yorker
I first encountered Tom Perriello, who lost the Virginia Democratic gubernatorial primary, on June 13th, almost twenty years ago.
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6 weeks ago
Robert P. Jones on the Decline of White Christian America - The Atlantic
Two-thirds of those who voted for the president felt his election was the "last chance to stop America's decline." But his victory won't arrest the cultural and demographic trends they opposed.
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6 weeks ago
Relax and Let Your Kids Indulge in TV - The New York Times
SYDNEY, Australia — My mother blames my father. Born before television arrived in Australia, let alone the coastal towns and logging villages where he grew up, he never tired of its novelty.
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6 weeks ago
Orion Magazine | When Compassion Becomes Dissent
1.I HAVE BEEN SERVING MY COUNTRY, this deceptively serene Rocky Mountain autumn, as a visiting instructor of creative writing at the University of Montana. I lead two classes, each three hours long, with twenty students all told.
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6 weeks ago
The Cheater’s Guide to Love | The New Yorker
Your girl catches you cheating. (Well, actually she’s your fiancée, but hey, in a bit it so won’t matter.
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6 weeks ago
Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough’s Extortion Claim Against Donald Trump and the National Enquirer | The New Yorker
Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski have just caused a sensation by claiming, in effect, that they were extorted by Donald Trump and the National Enquirer.
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6 weeks ago
Konica C35 film camera review | 120studio.com
The Konica C35 is a compact rangefinder camera from the Sixties. It shoots 35mm film. I'm here to tell you why I like this camera so much. Articles like this one exist only with the support of readers like you, when you buy your stuff through the links on here.
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6 weeks ago
A liberal think tank just released its own proposal to fix Obamacare - Vox
The most influential center-left think tank in DC has a new plan to fix Obamacare — and, perhaps surprisingly, it includes some of the same provisions as the Republican health bill in the Senate.
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7 weeks ago
Paris Review - Eddy
Anne Carson and I first met in 1988 at a writers’ workshop in Canada, and have been reading each other’s work ever since. The interview that follows is a mix of our usual conversation and discussion about topics that preoccupy Carson’s work—mysticism, antiquity, obsession, desire.
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7 weeks ago
How the Senate’s Health-Care Bill Threatens the Nation's Health | The New Yorker
To understand how the Senate Republicans’ health-care bill would affect people’s actual health, the first thing you have to understand is that incremental care—regular, ongoing care as opposed to heroic, emergency care—is the greatest source of value in modern medicine.
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7 weeks ago
Blueberry Chia Smoothie – EATON
When I was a professional athlete, smoothies were a lifesaver! Since I was in an event that required mostly speed and power, I was constantly working and tearing up my muscles. Therefore, I required a lot of protein to help repair and build them back up.
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7 weeks ago
The Occult Roots of Modernism | The New Yorker
In the Paris of the early eighteen-nineties, at the height of the Decadence, the man of the moment was the novelist, art critic, and would-be guru Joséphin Péladan, who named himself Le Sâr, after the ancient Akkadian word for “king.
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7 weeks ago
Selfie | The New Yorker
In Book III of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, from the first century B.C., we meet Narcissus, a young man so handsome that all the nymphs are in love with him. He doesn’t understand why; he wishes they would leave him alone.
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7 weeks ago
The Ethereal Genius of Craig Taborn - The New York Times
The jazz pianist Craig Taborn often goes to museums for inspiration, carrying a notebook to record ideas for compositions and song titles. He also sometimes performs at museums, becoming a sort of art object himself. This is a complicated situation for Taborn, who is very private.
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8 weeks ago
When Helicopter Parents Hover Even at Work - The New York Times
When the cameras start rolling Thursday night at Barclays Center, scene of the National Basketball Association draft, one of the biggest stories won’t be a player, but a parent: LaVar Ball, father of the U.C.L.A. phenom Lonzo Ball, who is projected to be among the top five picks.
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8 weeks ago
G.O.P. Health Plan Is Really a Rollback of Medicaid - The New York Times
Tucked inside the Republican bill to replace Obamacare is a plan to impose a radical diet on a 52-year-old program that insures nearly one in five Americans. The bill, of course, would modify changes to the health system brought by the Affordable Care Act.
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8 weeks ago
Jon Ossoff’s Georgia Sixth Loss Is a Reality Check for Democrats | The New Yorker
It is a truism in politics that special elections usually don’t mean very much. But Tuesday’s runoff election in the Georgia Six, as it came to be known, could be one of the exceptions to the rule.
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8 weeks ago
The Most Intimate Photograph | The New Yorker
One of the most beautiful photographs I know of is an image of a woman standing in the doorway of a barn, backlit in a sheer nightgown, peeing on the floorboards beneath her. It was taken in Danville, Virginia, in 1971, by the photographer Emmet Gowin, and the woman in question is his wife, Edith.
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8 weeks ago
Jon Ossoff, With Election Day Looming, Explains His Cautious Politics | The New Yorker
When Jon Ossoff was the C.E.O. of the Emmy-winning production company Insight TWI, which has made documentaries exposing judiciary corruption in Ghana and war crimes in Iraq, among other subjects, he had a simple mantra for the company’s approach: “Name, shame, and jail.
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8 weeks ago
Orion Magazine | Speaking of Nature
Image courtesy of the Yossi Milo Gallery. A CEMETERY SEEMED AN ODD PLACE to contemplate the boundaries of being.
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8 weeks ago
This Week in Fiction: Emma Cline on a Father Confronting His Son’s Transgression | The New Yorker
I_n “Northeast Regional,” your story in this week’s issue, a man named Richard is interrupted during a weekend away with someone else’s wife by the news that his son, Rowan, who’s at boarding school, has done something reprehensible.
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8 weeks ago
www.nytimes.com
At 68, Jeremy Corbyn has been on the Labour Party’s left flank longer than many of his most enthusiastic supporters — the ones who nearly propelled him to an upset victory in this month’s British general election — have been alive.
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8 weeks ago
How St. Augustine Invented Sex | The New Yorker
One day in 370 C.E., a sixteen-year-old boy and his father went to the public baths together in the provincial city of Thagaste, in what is now Algeria.
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8 weeks ago
www.nytimes.com
Jonathan Williams was three months into his ministry when his father called to say they needed to talk. Paul Williams, Jonathan’s father, was prominent in the evangelical Christian world, chairman of an organization that started independent churches around the country.
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8 weeks ago
Continuations by Albert Wenger : Some Lessons I Learned from the Dotcom Bubble for...
I spent a bunch of time at Consensus and Token Summit this week. If it wasn’t clear before, we are headed into a crypto currency bubble. Now a bubble isn’t in and of itself a bad thing.
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9 weeks ago
Death Is Optional | Edge.org
Could you elaborate on these possibilities? I mean, what's the distinction between predicting and setting up a range of possibilities? I think about it in visual terms, whether you try to narrow your field of vision, or to broaden it.
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9 weeks ago
Trail of Fears | New Republic
Donald Trump’s stunning decision to fire FBI Director James Comey brought inevitable comparisons to the “Saturday Night Massacre,” that evening in October 1973 when President Richard Nixon, enmeshed in the throes of Watergate, ordered independent special prosecutor Archibald Cox fired, and the
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9 weeks ago
302 Found
The Last Decade: An Introduction.
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9 weeks ago
www.nytimes.com
On a gray morning this spring, Chelsea Manning climbed into the back seat of a black S.U.V. and directed her security guard to drive her to the nearest Starbucks.
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9 weeks ago
Comey’s Revenge: Measuring Obstruction - The New Yorker
At the moment, on May 9th, when President Trump abruptly fired the F.B.I. director James Comey, Trump was not under investigation. He very well may be under investigation now.
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9 weeks ago
Comey on Trump: Liar, Liar, Liar, Liar, Liar | The Nation
Former FBI director James Comey torched what remains of President Donald Trump’s credibility Thursday afternoon, calling him a liar at least five times in three hours of testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee.
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10 weeks ago
James Comey’s Intellectual History - The New Yorker
More than three decades before the F.B.I. began investigating whether members of Donald Trump’s Presidential campaign had colluded with the Russian government, James Comey—the Bureau’s recently fired director—envisioned a Russian conquest of America.
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10 weeks ago
www.nytimes.com
In San Francisco’s public schools, Marc Benioff, the chief executive of Salesforce, is giving middle school principals $100,000 “innovation grants” and encouraging them to behave more like start-up founders and less like bureaucrats.
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10 weeks ago
Wonder Woman Is Propaganda | New Republic
“Hast du das gesehen?!” the villager gasped. As Wonder Woman hurtled through the air to pulverize a bell tower containing a German sniper, her thighs rippled and her hair streamed. She had just leaped from a car door repurposed as a springboard.
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10 weeks ago
Trump’s Staff Is in Denial, But World Leaders Aren’t | New Republic
In the closing days of a hard-fought election, the last thing British Prime Minister Theresa May needs is to get caught up in one of President Donald Trump’s social media dust-ups.
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10 weeks ago
www.nytimes.com
A troubling feature of political disagreement in the United States today is that many issues on which liberals and conservatives hold divergent views are questions not of value but of fact.
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10 weeks ago
A Guide to Guerrilla Parenting - The New Yorker
Say that you have two children, or maybe three, and that they fight for what’s theirs. The contested objects are many: cake, Lego sets, the right to various household electronics or to name the family dog.
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10 weeks ago
Essays – Tristan Harris
I’m an expert on how technology hijacks our psychological vulnerabilities. That’s why I spent the last three years as Google’s Design Ethicist caring about how to design things in a way that defends a billion people’s minds from getting hijacked.
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10 weeks ago
To Save Yourself from Sextortion, Send Naked Mole Rats, Not Nudes - The New Yorker
Where to start with the naked mole rat? Four inches long, hairless, pale, wrinkled, and spindly-legged, it lives in vast underground colonies in Africa, like a termite, and is more closely related to porcupines and guinea pigs than to moles or rats.
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10 weeks ago
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