Getting Married in One Week Was the Most Romantic Thing I Ever Did
This week, the Cut brings you True Romance: five days of stories about love as it’s actually lived. Dustin and I got engaged in the fall of 2013, on a mountain in Vermont. He got down on one knee on this big rock in front of a waterfall, out of nowhere.
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9 hours ago
A Creationist Sues the Grand Canyon for Religious Discrimination - The Atlantic
The national park wouldn’t let him collect rocks for research. “How did the Grand Canyon form?” is a question so commonly pondered that YouTube is rife with explanations.
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5 days ago
What Makes a Parent? - The New Yorker
The week before Labor Day, 2016, Circe Hamilton, a freelance photographer in her mid-forties, was preparing to move back to the U.K., after twenty years in New York.
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5 days ago
Firing Comey Was a Grave Abuse of Power - The New Yorker
On August 7, 1974, a trio of Republican politicians made a sombre journey from Capitol Hill to the White House.
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5 days ago
Child Mortality – The Paris Review
“I’ve been having a lot of anxiety about death lately,” my friend Kate said. It was early September and she and I and some others were crammed into a red leather booth in a bar that had once been a gas station. It was still warm outside but it wouldn’t be much longer.
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10 days ago
Donald Trump’s Craven Republican Enablers - The New Yorker
It is often said that the U.S. Presidency is a relatively weak office—but that is a contingent statement.
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10 days ago
The Path of Most Resistance | New Republic
The Resistance, as it’s come to be known, was born of anger and abandonment. The anger began the day after the election. Donald Trump, rejected by a decisive majority of voters, had been declared the next president of the United States.
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11 days ago
We Could Have Been Canada - The New Yorker
And what if it was a mistake from the start? The Declaration of Independence, the American Revolution, the creation of the United States of America—what if all this was a terrible idea, and what if the injustices and madness of American life since then have occurred not in spite of the virtues
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11 days ago
www.nytimes.com
When Daniel and Elizabeth married in 1993, they found it was easy enough to choose a ring for her, but there were far fewer choices for him.
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11 days ago
Is the Gig Economy Working? - The New Yorker
Not long ago, I moved apartments, and beneath the weight of work and lethargy a number of small, nagging tasks remained undone. Some art work had to be hung from wall moldings, using wire. In the bedroom, a round mirror needed mounting beside the door.
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13 days ago
A conservative case for single-payer health care
The GOP's latest health-care push is a magic show featuring the same malnourished rabbit being pulled from the same shabby top hat Republicans have been reaching their fingers into for years before pronouncing their now-familiar incantations. Abracadabra! they always say.
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14 days ago
Forbes Welcome
Election 2016 has prompted a wave of head-scratching on the left. Counties Trump won by staggering margins will be among the hardest hit by the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.
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15 days ago
The House G.O.P. Passes Its Shameful Health-Care Bill - The New Yorker
When the House Republican Conference gathered in Washington, D.C., on Thursday morning, it was greeted by a couple of motivational songs: “Eye of the Tiger” and “Taking Care of Business.” On Twitter, the A.P.
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17 days ago
Is Political Hubris an Illness? - The New Yorker
In February, 2009, the British medical journal Brain published an article on the intersection of health and politics titled “Hubris Syndrome: An Acquired Personality Disorder?” The authors were David Owen, the former British Foreign Secretary, who is also a physician and neuroscientist, and J
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17 days ago
The Devil Problem - The New Yorker
Sixteen years ago, Elaine Pagels, who was then a professor in her mid-thirties at Barnard College, shattered the myth that early Christianity was a unified movement and faith.
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22 days ago
A Hundred Days of Trump - The New Yorker
On April 29th, Donald Trump will have occupied the Oval Office for a hundred days. For most people, the luxury of living in a relatively stable democracy is the luxury of not following politics with a nerve-racked constancy. Trump does not afford this.
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23 days ago
What Bullets Do to Bodies - Highline
The first thing Dr. Amy Goldberg told me is that this article would be pointless. She said this on a phone call last summer, well before the election, before a tangible sensation that facts were futile became a broader American phenomenon.
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24 days ago
Laurie Penny | Life-Hacks of the Poor and Aimless
Late capitalism is like your love life: it looks a lot less bleak through an Instagram filter.
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26 days ago
Should you feel sad about the demise of the handwritten letter? | Aeon Ideas
A lot of people love personal letters now that very few people write them. We have publishing initiatives such as Letters in the Mail and The Letters Page, books such as For the Love of Letters (2007) or Signed, Sealed, Delivered (2014), and films such as Her (2013).
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26 days ago
www.nytimes.com
BARTLESVILLE, Okla. — When President Trump describes the Affordable Care Act as “imploding,” Lori Roll, an insurance agent here, does not consider it hyperbole.
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26 days ago
Rod Dreher’s Monastic Vision - The New Yorker
Rod Dreher was forty-four when his little sister died. At the time, he was living in Philadelphia with his wife and children. His sister, Ruthie, lived in their Louisiana home town, outside St. Francisville (pop. 1,712). Dreher’s family had been there for generations, but he had never fit in.
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26 days ago
A Father’s Final Odyssey - The New Yorker
One January evening a few years ago, just before the beginning of the spring term in which I was going to be teaching an undergraduate seminar on the Odyssey, my father, a retired computer scientist who was then eighty-one, asked me, for reasons I thought I understood at the time, if he could sit
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26 days ago
#Vanlife, the Bohemian Social-Media Movement - The New Yorker
Emily King and Corey Smith had been dating for five months when they took a trip to Central America, in February, 2012. At a surf resort in Nicaragua, Smith helped a lanky American named Foster Huntington repair the dings in his board.
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5 weeks ago
NYU's Gary Marcus is an artificial intelligence contrarian - Technical.ly Brooklyn
As we’ve reported, NYU Tandon is making a bid for New York City to become the capital city of artificial intelligence.
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5 weeks ago
Minimalism: another boring product wealthy people can buy | Life and style | The Guardian
Minimalism is just another form of conspicuous consumption, a way of saying to the world: ‘Look at me! Look at all of the things I have refused to buy!’
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5 weeks ago
The Conservative Pipeline to the Supreme Court - The New Yorker
The Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Neil Gorsuch, which were held last month, in Washington, D.C., quickly fell into a pattern.
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6 weeks ago
Top Monospace Fonts For Developers - Freebie Supply
A big part of a developer’s job, apart from writing code, is reading code. Some people claim that most programmers read more code than they write. Which means that a good reading experience is important. So choosing a monospaced typeface that is easy to read can help a lot.
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6 weeks ago
“S-Town” Investigates the Human Mystery - The New Yorker
“S-Town,” the mesmerizing new podcast from the team behind “Serial” and “This American Life,” was released in its entirety on Tuesday—seven hour-long “chapters” about the mysteries and tragedies surrounding the life of a brilliant, troubled man in a small Alabama town.
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6 weeks ago
Taibbi: Putin Derangement Syndrome Arrives - Rolling Stone
So Michael Flynn, who was Donald Trump's national security adviser before he got busted talking out of school to Russia's ambassador, has reportedly offered to testify in exchange for immunity. For seemingly the 100th time, social media is exploding. This is it! The big reveal!
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6 weeks ago
Becoming Joan Didion | New Republic
It is difficult to pinpoint precisely when Joan Didion ceased to be a contemporary writer in the public imagination and began to be converted into a saint of the literary canon.
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7 weeks ago
No fear, just fastballs | Mariners Preview 2017
Fastball or slider? There was only one choice in the mind of Edwin Diaz. His heart was pounding as adrenaline powered by intensity and irritation pulsed through his body.
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7 weeks ago
How Moderates Took Back Kansas - The New Yorker
This week, the Kansas Senate voted by a wide margin to expand the state’s Medicaid coverage. A majority of Democrats supported the bill, as might be expected, but so did a majority of Republicans.
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7 weeks ago
The Kind of Comedy That Can Hurt Trump - The New Yorker
Last Friday, on the day of President Trump’s Inauguration, a masked assailant in Washington punched the white-nationalist political activist Richard Spencer in the head.
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7 weeks ago
The Keystone Kops in the White House - The New Yorker
“My fellow-Americans,” Donald Trump said in his weekly address on Friday, “It’s an exciting time for our country. Our new Administration has so much change under way— change that is going to strengthen our Union and improve so many people’s lives.
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7 weeks ago
Is Fat Killing You, or Is Sugar? - The New Yorker
In the early nineteen-sixties, when cholesterol was declared an enemy of health, my parents quickly enlisted in the war on fat.
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7 weeks ago
The Observer profile: Yvon Chouinard | Environment | The Guardian
The man who pioneered environmental activism claims to be more interested in scaling mountains than in making money. Yet his company has been valued at $500m.
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7 weeks ago
The Republicans Have Primed Our Government for Failure | New Republic
In the wake of Trumpcare’s spectacular demise last week, Republicans are having a difficult time sticking to a coherent story about what went wrong, what comes next, and why they’ll succeed.
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7 weeks ago
www.nytimes.com
We know already that the 2017 baseball season will be different, because we know what we’re missing. Gone are the soothing soundtrack of Vin Scully and the stylish slugging of David Ortiz. The persistent misery of the Chicago Cubs has gone poof.
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7 weeks ago
Week Ten: Participatory Culture | Open Learning
What is Participatory Culture? How does it differ from consumer culture? Our anchor reading this week is Henry Jenkins, et al., “Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century” (2006). You can download this white paper at https://www.macfound.
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7 weeks ago
The Problem with Poetry Students, and Other Lessons from Derek Walcott - The New Yorker
One night in the fall of 2002, I was out to dinner at a Mexican restaurant with the poet Derek Walcott, who had been my professor in the graduate poetry program at Boston University.
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8 weeks ago
The Health-Care Debacle Was a Failure of Conservatism - The New Yorker
Let the recriminations begin! Actually, the health-care-failure finger-pointing got under way well before Friday, when Donald Trump and Paul Ryan cancelled a House vote on the American Health Care Act.
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8 weeks ago
Daniel Dennett’s Science of the Soul - The New Yorker
Four billion years ago, Earth was a lifeless place. Nothing struggled, thought, or wanted. Slowly, that changed. Seawater leached chemicals from rocks; near thermal vents, those chemicals jostled and combined. Some hit upon the trick of making copies of themselves that, in turn, made more copies.
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8 weeks ago
The Trump Campaign Has Been Under Investigation Since July - The New Yorker
At 6:35 A.M. on Monday, a few hours before the House Intelligence Committee convened its first public hearing on Russian involvement in the U.S. election, President Donald J. Trump asserted once more that the issue was nothing more than an elaborate political distraction.
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9 weeks ago
The Reclusive Hedge-Fund Tycoon Behind the Trump Presidency - The New Yorker
Last month, when President Donald Trump toured a Boeing aircraft plant in North Charleston, South Carolina, he saw a familiar face in the crowd that greeted him: Patrick Caddell, a former Democratic political operative and pollster who, for forty-five years, has been prodding insurgent Presidential
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9 weeks ago
This Brilliant Memoir Will Challenge What You Think You Know About Loss and Pregnancy | Mother Jones
For most of her life, Ariel Levy's disregard for rules and expectations has mostly paid off. As a child, she preferred adventurous make-believe to playing house.
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9 weeks ago
Openly Dedicated | Gardner Writes
When I got to college, I discovered there was a thing called intellectual history. Part of intellectual history, I also learned, was intellectual lineage: not just idea leading to idea, but thinker leading to thinker. Groups of writers interacting synchronously and asynchronously.
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9 weeks ago
www.nytimes.com
Joe Biden’s personal compartment on the modified Boeing 757 that serves as Air Force Two had the feel of a motel manager’s office equipped with state-of-the-art communications gear.
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9 weeks ago
The real You, part 1 – a n n i e m u e l l e r
So it’s like this. You exist in this fullness. When you are born, you are already full and complete and perfect. Everything is potential. So much possibility. No limits. It’s exhilarating and exciting and you’re unstoppable.
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9 weeks ago
Donald Trump Finally Pays a Price for His False and Reckless Words - The New Yorker
As a Presidential candidate, Donald Trump led a charmed existence. Whatever he said, no matter how outrageous, it didn’t seem to hurt him.
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9 weeks ago
Erick Erickson Is Sorry About Some of the Things He Has Said - The New Yorker
Erick Erickson, the forty-one-year-old right-wing radio host and political pundit whom The Atlantic described in 2015 as “the most powerful conservative in America,” has made a career of online provocation.
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9 weeks ago
The Unlikely Liberal Hero Adam Schiff Is Ready to Investigate Trump - The New Yorker
On Monday, March 20th, the House intelligence committee will hold its first open hearing on Russia’s meddling in the 2016 Presidential campaign.
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9 weeks ago
Confessions of a Watch Geek - The New Yorker
At the start of 2016, I had a bad feeling. Time was not working right. Some weeks were as snappy as days, others were as elastic as months, and the months felt as if they were either bleeding into one another three at a time—Jabruarch—or segmenting into Gregorian-calendar city-states. Feb. Rue.
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9 weeks ago
Dad doesn’t call 911, treats girl’s gunshot with 1st aid kit | The Seattle Times
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (AP) — A Virginia man was arrested after police say he treated his daughter’s gunshot wound with a first aid kit instead of calling 911. The Daily Press reports (http://bit.ly/2mFlll7 ) 30-year-old Maurice Jones was jailed Sunday child abuse and gun charges.
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10 weeks ago
Have You Lost Your Mind? - The New Yorker
“Write about what you know,” the creative-writing teachers advise, hoping to avoid twenty-five stories about robots in love on Mars. And what could you know better than the inside of your own head? Almost anything.
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10 weeks ago
The Fasinatng… Fascinating History of Autocorrect | WIRED
Invoke the word autocorrect and most people will think immediately of its hiccups—the sort of hysterical, impossible errors one finds collected on sites like Damn You Autocorrect.
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10 weeks ago
Geronimo’s Pass | Center for Humans & Nature
There was a time when the leaders of biology were naturalists: Charles Darwin, Alfred Wallace, Henry Bates, and Louis Agassiz.
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10 weeks ago
If America’s public lands were a business, the GOP would be bungling the balance sheet - LA Times
American politicians have always been obsessed with running government “like a business.” They promise to make bureaucracies leaner and let the free market fix all our problems.
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10 weeks ago
Limor Fried’s Artful Electronics - The New Yorker
In 1880, Giovanni Morelli, a sixty-four-year-old critic and historian from Italy, caused a sensation in the art world.
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10 weeks ago
The American Health Care Act: the Republicans’ bill to replace Obamacare, explained - Vox
House Republicans released their long-awaited replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act on Monday. The American Health Care Act was developed in conjunction with the White House and Senate Republicans.
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10 weeks ago
Trump is performing the role of president, not doing the job - Vox
The Donald Trump Show is getting stale, old, and, frankly, a little bit boring. President Trump’s big speech before Congress on Tuesday night was the epitome of the show.
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11 weeks ago
The two kinds of stories we tell about ourselves |
We’ve all created our own personal histories, marked by highs and lows, that we share with the world — and we can shape them to live with more meaning and purpose.
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11 weeks ago
Sanity from the Courts on Gun Control in a Time of Trump - The New Yorker
It may be small comfort to read a court decision rooted in the desire to prevent another Newtown-style massacre from happening at a time when the President of the United States is eager to listen to a figure from beyond the lunatic fringe like Alex Jones, who claims that the school shooting in
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12 weeks ago
The Cinematic Traumas of Kenneth Lonergan - The New Yorker
Kenneth Lonergan, the screenwriter, director, and playwright, wears a wristwatch that is set fifteen minutes fast—an effort, he told me when we first met, to correct a stubborn habit of lateness.
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12 weeks ago
Trump, Putin, and the New Cold War - The New Yorker
On April 12, 1982, Yuri Andropov, the chairman of the K.G.B., ordered foreign-intelligence operatives to carry out “active measures”—aktivniye meropriyatiya—against the reëlection campaign of President Ronald Reagan.
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12 weeks ago
Forbes Welcome
I’m reading Chris Dombrowski’s Body of Water now. This is what some of us anglers in northern climes do in the middle of winter when we lack the time or money or luck to find ourselves in South America, New Zealand or the Bahamas. We read. We reflect.
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12 weeks ago
www.nytimes.com
As a medical resident working 30-hour shifts, I quickly came to cherish those rare moments when I could duck out of the bustling and brightly lit hospital corridors and lay my head on a pillow. Granted, it was often in a barren call room with a stiff mattress and a rumbling heater.
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12 weeks ago
Can H. R. McMaster Survive as Trump’s National-Security Adviser? - The New Yorker
Whenever I think of H. R. McMaster, President Trump’s choice to be his national-security adviser, I picture him throwing a football with his soldiers on a muddy field outside Tal Afar, Iraq.
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12 weeks ago
Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds - The New Yorker
In 1975, researchers at Stanford invited a group of undergraduates to take part in a study about suicide. They were presented with pairs of suicide notes. In each pair, one note had been composed by a random individual, the other by a person who had subsequently taken his own life.
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12 weeks ago
When Evidence Says No, But Doctors Say Yes - ProPublica
First, listen to the story with the happy ending: At 61, the executive was in excellent health. His blood pressure was a bit high, but everything else looked good, and he exercised regularly. Then he had a scare. He went for a brisk post-lunch walk on a cool winter day, and his chest began to hurt.
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12 weeks ago
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12 weeks ago
Trump's Ethos: Truth Is What You Can Get Away With - The Atlantic
Trump’s attacks on the free press don’t just threaten the media—they undermine the public’s capacity to think, act, and defend democracy.
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february 2017
Melinda Gates is on a mission to boost women in tech fields | The Seattle Times
Melinda Gates has some advice for tech workers flooding into Seattle for jobs at Amazon and other cutting-edge companies: Do your part to make the field more diverse.
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february 2017
What’s Wrong with Me? - The New Yorker
Illness narratives usually have startling beginnings—the fall at the supermarket, the lump discovered in the abdomen, the doctor’s call. Not mine. I got sick the way Hemingway says you go broke: “gradually and then suddenly.
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february 2017
302 Found
One day last summer I was creeping in my rental car along the Alameda de las Pulgas — the Avenue of Fleas — in Menlo Park, trying to spot a house number without getting rear-ended. This wasn’t going to be the usual product demo.
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february 2017
Insomniac City: Bill Hayes’s Extraordinary Love Letter to New York, Oliver Sacks, and Love Itself – Brain Pickings
Mary Oliver wrote in her beautiful meditation on how differences bring couples closer together.
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february 2017
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