wi-fi   3474

« earlier    

What I’ve learned from nearly three years of enterprise Wi-Fi at home | Ars Technica
The ups and downs of software-defined networking—and having too many access points.
There is a moment of perfect stillness after the cable slips through my fingers and vanishes back up the hole in the ceiling like an angry snake. Then the opening stanza of a rich poem of invective leaps from my lips and my wife stares up at me from below, eyes wide, frozen just as I am, ready to catch me if I rage too hard and lose my balance.
But perched precariously on the top step of an inadequate and shaky ladder in the corner of my living room, drenched in sweat and speckled head to toe in pink insulation and sheetrock dust, body aching with dull red heat, I just can’t maintain the torrent of swearing. I’m too tired. The words die on my lips and I drop my burning arms to my side. Sweat stings my cut hands—“man hands,” my wife has always called them, hands that seem to always sport an ever-changing collection of cuts and dry spots and calluses and torn nails as house or computer projects come and go. Tiny drops of blood ooze from shredded cuticles.
Maybe I’ll just stand here for a few hours and not move, I think, mind going blank rather than face the thought of climbing back up into the baking attic and fishing out the cable from underneath mountains of insulation. Maybe I don’t even need Wi-Fi anymore. Maybe I don’t even need computers anymore. Maybe I should throw away everything I own and live in the mountains and grow my own food and never think about technology ever again.
But let’s back up a bit.
wi-fi  networking  home_stuff  enterprise 
2 days ago by rgl7194
Wi-Fi Switches from Obscure Protocol Names to Simple Generation Numbers - TidBITS
Forget 802.11ax. Say hello to Wi-Fi 6. The Wi-Fi Alliance announced that it will add generation numbers to its trademarked Wi-Fi name, which indicates a device meets its compatibility tests, rather than relying on obscure protocol names set by a standards group.
In the new scheme, Wi-Fi’s numbering starts at what the Wi-Fi Alliance has decided is the 4th generation:
802.11n is Wi-Fi 4
802.11ac is Wi-Fi 5
802.11ax is Wi-Fi 6
This change is purely cosmetic, as it doesn’t affect the certification process or the industry standards group’s work.
wi-fi 
11 days ago by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: Wi-Fi Switches From Obscure Protocol Names to Simple Generation Numbers
Glenn Fleishman — who knows more about Wi-Fi than anyone I know — explains the whole “Wi-Fi 6” thing:
The Wi-Fi Alliance’s new numbering system focuses on generations of speed improvements but looks back only to 802.11n, which is a decade old. Given that 802.11a and 802.11b were approved at the same time, implicitly calling them Wi-Fi 1 and Wi-Fi 2, and extending Wi-Fi 3 to 802.11g, isn’t quite right. But we anticipate people will do it anyway.
Simplifying device compatibility through better naming seems like a clever idea that’s long overdue, and one that should help people who have no interest in technical standards arcana. The next time someone asks me what Wi-Fi router they should buy, I look forward to saying, “Wi-Fi 6. Look for it on the box.”
wi-fi 
11 days ago by rgl7194
Wi-Fi Alliance moves to version numbers, recommends new visual UI indicators | iLounge News
The Wi-Fi Alliance has announced that it is simplifying the naming conventions for Wi-Fi standards with the introduction of “Wi-Fi 6,” a new designation for the protocol otherwise known as 801.11ax. With the new standard comes a generational renaming of other recent Wi-Fi standards to provide more clarity on where they fit into the spectrum — 802.11n will become “Wi-Fi 4” and 802.11ac will henceforth be known as “Wi-Fi 5.” While one could assume that this would mean that older 802.11b and 802.11g technologies also get similar designations, such as “Wi-Fi 1” for the original 802.11b standard, the Wi-Fi Alliance’s announcement and corresponding Generational Wi-Fi User Guide provide no references to any standards older than Wi-Fi 4, so it appears the Alliance will simply be ignoring the prior standards, which makes some sense considering the majority of modern consumer devices provide at least Wi-Fi 4 (802.11n) support.
wi-fi  networking  standards  simplicity 
14 days ago by rgl7194
Wi-Fi 6 is the next big upgrade to wireless networks | iMore
The new standard will start arriving on devices in 2019.
Wi-Fi is something we all use each and every day, but with crazy names such as 802.11n and 802.11ac, it can be difficult to remember which standard is better than another. When the next generation of Wi-Fi arrives (802.11ax), it'll go by a much simpler name — Wi-Fi 6.
The Wi-Fi Alliance announced this change on Wednesday, October 3, saying:
For nearly two decades, Wi-Fi users have had to sort through technical naming conventions to determine if their devices support the latest Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi Alliance is excited to introduce Wi-Fi 6, and present a new naming scheme to help industry and Wi-Fi users easily understand the Wi-Fi generation supported by their device or connection.
wi-fi  networking  standards  simplicity 
17 days ago by rgl7194
Wi-Fi gets versioned - Six Colors
The Wi-Fi Alliance has announced that it’s replacing the alphabet soup of versions with version numbers. Here’s Jacob Kastrenakes at The Verge, breaking it down:
All of those convoluted codenames are being changed. So instead of the current Wi-Fi being called 802.11ac, it’ll be called Wi-Fi 5 (because it’s the fifth version). It’ll probably make more sense this way, starting with the first version of Wi-Fi, 802.11b:
Wi-Fi 1: 802.11b (1999) Wi-Fi 2: 802.11a (1999) Wi-Fi 3: 802.11g (2003) Wi-Fi 4: 802.11n (2009) Wi-Fi 5: 802.11ac (2014)
Much as I’ll miss the esoteric letters, this will be a heck of a lot easier to explain to non-techie family and friends. We’re all accustomed to version numbers these days.
The one downside (for users) is that it probably will end up making some people feel like they need to upgrade when their setup is still probably fine—the limiting factor to your Internet speeds isn’t usually your Wi-Fi setup. (Still on Wi-Fi 4 here, friends!)
All of this happens in advance of Wi-Fi 6 (née 802.11ax), which is supposed to debut next year. It will be interesting to see companies adopting the branding; the Wi-Fi Alliance reportedly even wants this to show up in software when you choose Wi-Fi networks.
Overall, though, incrementing simple numbers does seem like it will make things easier. I know at least one guy who will be pleased.
wi-fi  networking  standards  simplicity 
17 days ago by rgl7194
Wi-Fi now has version numbers, and Wi-Fi 6 comes out next year - The Verge
If you’ve ever bought a Wi-Fi router, you may have had to sort through specs that read like complete gibberish — like “802.11ac” or “a/b/g/n.” But going forward, Wi-Fi is adopting version numbers so that it’ll be easier to tell whether the router or device you’re buying is on the latest version.
In the past, Wi-Fi versions were identified by a letter or a pair of letters that referred to a wireless standard. The current version is 802.11ac, but before that, we had 802.11n, 802.11g, 802.11a, and 802.11b. It was not comprehensible, so the Wi-Fi Alliance — the group that stewards the implementation of Wi-Fi — is changing it.
All of those convoluted codenames are being changed. So instead of the current Wi-Fi being called 802.11ac, it’ll be called Wi-Fi 5 (because it’s the fifth version). It’ll probably make more sense this way, starting with the first version of Wi-Fi, 802.11b:
Wi-Fi 1: 802.11b (1999)
Wi-Fi 2: 802.11a (1999)
Wi-Fi 3: 802.11g (2003)
Wi-Fi 4: 802.11n (2009)
Wi-Fi 5: 802.11ac (2014)
wi-fi  networking  standards  simplicity 
17 days ago by rgl7194
Wi-Fi Gets Simplified Version Numbers and Next Version is Wi-Fi 6
Do you know what is the latest version of Wi-Fi? It's okay if you don't know.
It is — Wi-Fi is 802.11ac.
I am sure many of us can't answer this question immediately because the Wi-Fi technology doesn't have a traditional format of version numbers… at least until yesterday.
The Wi-Fi Alliance—the group that manages the implementation of Wi-Fi—has today announced that the next version of WiFi standard, which is 802.11ax, will use a simpler naming scheme and will be called WiFi 6.
wi-fi  networking  standards  simplicity 
17 days ago by rgl7194
Wi-Fi branding to get a lot simpler with upcoming “Wi-Fi 6” | Ars Technica
New naming scheme should make it much easier to remember which one is better.
The Wi-Fi Alliance, the trade group that develops and promotes wireless networking standards, is attempting to make Wi-Fi naming a bit simpler with the introduction of 802.11ax next year.
The plan is to brand the new specification as "Wi-Fi 6," rebrand 802.11ac as "Wi-Fi 5," and 802.11n as "Wi-Fi 4," making it easy to tell at a glance which standard is newer and, hence, faster.
The current naming uses IEEE's terminology. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers oversees development of a wide range of electrical and electronic standards. The standards are organized into groups; IEEE 802 covers all local area network standards. 802.11 specifically covers Wireless LAN.
wi-fi  networking  standards  simplicity 
17 days ago by rgl7194
Twitter
-Fi is getting a new naming convention!

Here is what the new Wi-Fi names will look like:

802.11n to Wi-Fi 4…
Wi-Fi  from twitter_favs
17 days ago by FiloSottile
Twitter
-Fi is getting a new naming convention!

Here is what the new Wi-Fi names will look like:

802.11n to Wi-Fi 4…
Wi-Fi  from twitter_favs
17 days ago by jamescampbell
Wi-Fi gets versioned
"The Wi-Fi Alliance has announced that it’s replacing the alphabet soup of versions with version numbers."
-
Dan Moren
(2 October 2018)
Six Colors
Wi-Fi  WiFi  versions  numbering  news  WiFi1  WiFi2  WiFi3  WiFi4  WiFi5  WiFi6  Wi-Fi-1  Wi-Fi-2  Wi-Fi-3  Wi-Fi-4  Wi-Fi-5  Wi-Fi-6  WiFiA  WiFiB  WiFiG  WiFiN  WiFiAC  WiFiAX  changes  2018  Wi-Fi-Alliance  WiFiAlliance  SixColors  DanMoren  feedy 
17 days ago by Mykl
Leading RF Security Vulnerabilities in 2018 — Bastille
Wi-FI: Krack
Keyless entry
Medical devices
Remotely hijacking vehicles

"RF vulnerabilities are most often not the result of flaws in operating systems and applications. The problems often reside in the firmware of communications chips, which are trade secrets not open to public inspection. An attack on them bypasses not just network firewalls but many forms of detection. The vulnerable devices are often simple, mass-produced ones, the kind found on the Internet of Things. Many manufacturers pay more attention to price than security."
Bastille  cybersecurity  RF  Wi-Fi  vulnerability 
4 weeks ago by pierredv
Leaking Wi-Fi credentials using packet length
Zero config Wi-Fi configuration. Packet sniffing with regular traffic and patterns to grab packet lengths. No need to decrypt.
Wi-Fi  Security 
4 weeks ago by traggett

« earlier    

related tags

-  179.00  1st  2.0  2017  2018  21  2400x600  3  464487  5g  5ghz  6lowpan  7.3"  8000  802.11  802.11ax  a19  a4  abi  access  adapter  air  airdrop-style  airplane  ambiance  an  and  android  android4  android8  announces  anonymity  antennas  any  app  apple  arduino  asus  asus’s  b+  b  backup  bastille  best  bestbuy  between  bezpieczeństwo-informatyczne  big  black/color  blue  bluetooth  boyo  bridge  bts  btu  bulb  bulk  buy  c261sfnw  cables  can  canbus  cave  changes  charger  chromecast  cli  clive  coexistence  color  columbus  commandl  comparison  complete  conditioner  configure  connected  connection  control  cool_tools  crowdsourced  crutchfield  ct  customer_loyalty  cybersecurity  danmoren  dd-wrt  devices  digital  dpi  ecc  ecotank  enabling  encryption  enterprise  epson  esp  esp32  et-4500  ethernet  everyone  expansion  exploiting  express  facebook  fast-food  fcc  featured  feedy  files  find  finding  firmware  fix  for  frigidaire  future  gadgets  gdpr  geeky  google  google_wifi  hack  hardware  hdmi  home_stuff  homes  hotspot  hotspots  how-to  how  howto  https  hub  hue  ieee-spectrum  if  ifttt  iiot  imei  improve  infrastructure  ink  instructions  intel  interference  internet  inwigilacja  ios  iot  ipad  iphone  iphonex  is  it  its...  its  itunes  japan  jm  keychain-access  keychain  keychainaccess.app  keychainaccess  lang-pl  laser  launches  lbma  led  lets  lh  lifestyle  light  linux  list  lists_of_bests  local-operated  location_based_services  lontv  look-up  lookup  louis  loyalty_management  lte  lyra  m2m  mac  macadmin  macintosh  macos  macosx  maker.io  malware  marketing  mdp  mesh  messaging  mint  miracast  mirror  mobile  moca  monitor  monitoring  mpu  multifunction  nb-iot  nbiot  network  networking  networks  news  nexus  nomad  notes_app  numbering  of  ofcom  offers  oobe  openwrt  or  osx  over  overview  owc  packs  password  passwords  philips  phishing  pi  plover  podcast  posts  ppm  prefs  print  printer  privacy  producthunt  productivity  protection  protocole  public  python  q&a  qsr  radio  raspberry  receivers  reference  replacement  retrieve  review  rf  ricoh  roaming  rohde&schwatz  router  routers  routeur  samsung  scam  school-buses  science  secure-connection  security  set  share  shopping  show  shows  simplicity  singapore  sixcolors  smart  sms  software  sp  speed  standards  stealing  steve-sande  stevesande  subway  sync  system  szyfrowanie  sécurité  tank  taxes  tcp  tech  techcrunch  technology  telefon-komórkowy  tell  terms  test  the  theft  thread  tips  to  tool  top_ten  transportation-industry  travel  tricks  trio  troubleshooting  trust  turnstyle  unlicensed  up  url  utility  verizon  versions  via  vpn  vtw73m  vulnerability  web  white  wi-fi-1  wi-fi-2  wi-fi-3  wi-fi-4  wi-fi-5  wi-fi-6  wi-fi-alliance  wifi  wifi1  wifi2  wifi3  wifi4  wifi5  wifi6  wifia  wifiac  wifialliance  wifiax  wifib  wifig  wifin  window  windows  wired  wireless  with  wlan  wpa3  you  your  z-wave  zero  zigbee  |      📶 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: