warp_speed   5

Get Ready to Defend the Free Market
06.02.97 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard

LET'S CLONE GEORGE GILDER. One is just not enough. The original I'd keep in his current job as a technology writer and forecaster of the first rank. Nobody rea...
Rich_Karlgaard  free_markets  George_Soros  warp_speed  George_Gilder  income_inequality  tempo  operational_tempo  '90s  capitalism  digital_economy  from notes
august 2017 by jerryking
Finding a New Niche May Offer Better Chance at Fat Margins - WSJ.com
May 13, 2003 | WSJ | By JEFF BAILEY | Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
These days, with information and capital zipping around at warp speed, a business or industry with fat margins essentially has a target painted on its back.

And yet, plenty of small and midsize companies in less-than-glamorous industries manage, some year after year, to post enviable margins. Some have patents or other intellectual property that protect them from competition. Others have invested large sums in plant and equipment to acquire economies of scale that scare off new market entrants. Some defend themselves by knitting together extensive sales-and-distribution networks that would take years to replicate.
patents  intellectual_property  entrepreneur  business_models  dealerships  automotive_industry  barcodes  medical_devices  hospitals  niches  unglamorous  differentiation  proprietary  small_business  mid-market  barriers_to_entry  economies_of_scale  margins  warp_speed  defensive_tactics  distribution_channels 
may 2012 by jerryking
Hezbollah as 'a hot cell for innovation'Why our intentions 'don't just fail, they backfire'
Apr 19, 2009 | Toronto Star | Lynda Hurst.

we're still using anachronistic ideas to hold together a global order that no longer exists. A revolution is in progress where the unthinkable all too readily becomes the inevitable.

The result? More – and more dangerous – reversals of intent and outcome.

"What's happening today is that our intentions don't just fail, they backfire on us," says the Beijing-based geo-strategy analyst. "We deliver the opposite of what we intend because we so misunderstand the way the system now works."

The "war on terrorism" creates even more terrorists. The attempt to build a risk-proof financial system produces more risks than anyone is able to foresee. The bid to spread capitalism across the globe widens the chasm between rich and poor. The effort to contain nuclear proliferation leads to rogue states such as North Korea and Iran playing gimme-gimme games (or maybe not) with the final option.

Think Mikhail Gorbachev setting out only to reform the Soviet Union, but instead triggering its downfall, which in turn leads the U.S. to conclude its values have won the Cold War. Not so, Ramo says. Or George W. Bush reckoning he can inject democracy into Iraq and, presto, out comes peace: "Absurd in the extreme."

The new rules are
still being formed. They will be based on one central premise: countless
variations in the scheme of things will continue to occur at warp
speed, and adapting to them equally as quickly will be crucial. The
unpredictable demands of constant newness can immobilize institutions,
however, not just individuals. It can blind them to unsprung traps,
freeze once-honed navigation skills. The structure of the U.S. State
Department has barely changed since the end of World War II.

Governments can't prepare for everything in the future, but they can
build resilience into their systems. Real power will be the ability to
come back strong after an unexpected shock. That will mean persistently
assessing the big picture, not just its component pieces.
new_normal  uncertainty  Joshua_Cooper_Ramo  geopolitics  unpredictability  resilience  21st._century  adaptability  managing_uncertainty  Hezbollah  unintended_consequences  unexpected  political_power  accelerated_lifecycles  U.S._State_Department  immobilize  paralyze  constant_change  revenge_effects  rogue_actors  unthinkable  misunderstandings  Cambrian_explosion  iterations  Octothorpe_Software  Mikhail_Gorbachev  the_big_picture  warp_speed  financial_system 
may 2009 by jerryking
Without Restraint Tides of confusion have washed up Mark Foley, Wonder Land - WSJ.com
Friday, October 6, 2006 WSJ columnist by DANIEL HENNINGER.
Clipped because there is an interesting paragraph on clarity of thought.

As a result, we live now in an era awash in cultural confusions. The tides bring in weird phenomena, like the Mark Foley story, leave them on the beach overnight, then drag them back out to sea before there's time to make much sense of what we saw. As often as not, we don't even try. The Web and digital technology have ramped up the cultural velocity to warp speed. MySpace, YouTube -- the once-bright line between the private and public spheres has evaporated.

This has had an effect on the way we think, or don't. Clarity -- thinking clearly -- is harder than ever to achieve, because clarity assumes a degree of general social agreement about things. For instance, time was that most people would agree that putting a crucifix in urine and calling it art doesn't qualify as anything but bad thinking. But no, we had to have a big argument over that. At the end of her current stage act, Madonna makes herself the central figure in a crucifixion scene. No problem. Most reviewers simply describe it, and move on.

Challenge over the past 40 years became a more powerful social value than clarity. One of the byproducts of challenge is that you don't have to think very much -- about the point or the consequences. Just do it. The act of challenge is its own justification. And one of the byproducts of constant challenge is aggressive confusion.
op_ed  Daniel_Henninger  WONDER_LAND  social_media  Madonna  clarity  cultural_change  revenge_effects  controversies  warp_speed  social_challenge 
february 2009 by jerryking

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