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Who Are Your Active Users? Strategies for User Analysis
"A tool like Clearbit provides enriched data— name, location, mini bio— that you then collect and feed through an app like Segment that sends it to an analytics platform like Amplitude for review and interpretation." via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2NKw4oD A tool like Clearbit provides enriched data— name, location, mini bio— that you then collect and feed through an app like Segment that sends it to an analytics platform like Amplitude for review and interpretation.
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4 days ago by broderboy
Mac Power Users #452: 2018 Developer Roundtable - Relay FM
Mac Power Users -

Ken Case of the Omni Group, Greg Scown of Smile, and Dave Teare of Agile Bits join David and Katie to talk about the state of development for Mac and iOS and life as an Apple Developer.

This episode of Mac Power Users is sponsored by:

Fujitsu ScanSnap ScanSnap Helps You Live a More Productive, Efficient, Paperless Life.

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Ken Case (@kcase) | Twitter

Greg Scown (@macgreg) | Twitter

Dave Teare (@dteare) | Twitter
Podcast  Mac  Power  Users 
6 days ago by Frunsman
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Google is loyal to its . They want . Use structured markup to get your solutions founds.…
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10 days ago by jhill5
Mac Power Users #451: Task Management Strategies - Relay FM
Mac Power Users -

David and Katie revisit the topic of task management. We talk about digital task managers, our history managing tasks, various tiers of task management from simplified to advanced, systems for digitally managing our tasks and how to keep it all together.

This episode of Mac Power Users is sponsored by:

Squarespace: Make your next move. Enter offer code MPU at checkout to get 10% off your first purchase.

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TextExpander from Smile Type more with less effort! Expand short abbreviations into longer bits of text, even fill-ins, with TextExpander from Smile.

1Password Have you ever forgotten a password? Now you don't have to worry about that anymore. Save up to 20% using this link.

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Full Focus Planner | A planner by Michael Hyatt

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity: David Allen

OmniFocus - task management for Mac, iPad, and iPhone - The Omni Group

The all-new Things. Your to-do list for Mac & iOS

Due: The Superfast Reminder App for iPhone & iPad

Welcome to Reminders on Mac - Apple Support

Flexibits | Fantastical 2 for Mac | Meet your Mac's new calendar.

OmniFocus Field Guide, Third Edition | MacSparky Field Guides

Scotty tells us how he keeps his reputation as a miracle worker - YouTube
Podcast  Mac  Power  Users 
13 days ago by Frunsman
Elites like Amazon’s Jeff Bezos think they’re being philanthropic. But they could do so much more. - Recode
Elites like Amazon’s Jeff Bezos think they’re being philanthropic. But they could do so much more.
“Winners Take All” author Anand Giridharadas says elites only help on their own terms — and never in any way that would endanger their own extreme wealth.
Eric JohnsonOct 3, 2018, 6:15am EDT
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos
Drew Angerer / Getty Images
When someone like Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos pledges billions to fight homelessness and fund preschool education, that sounds like good news — better for those causes to have money than not. But Bezos and his peers only ever give on their own terms, says “Winners Take All” author Anand Giridharadas.
“These people love to ask what they can do, they never ask what they have done,” Giridharadas said on the latest episode of Recode Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher. “How am I involved in this problem? How have my work practices been involved in this? How am I the product of a system of taxation and labor and all these other things that allowed me to make this fortune?”
Giridharadas’s new book, which critiques “The Elite Charade of Changing the World,” argues that our highly unequal society has fostered “a set of bullshit ideas that we all sort of passively believe” — for example, that alumni of McKinsey and Goldman Sachs should be in charge of charitable foundations, when in fact those organizations have created many of the problems the foundations seek to solve.
“This is just about as disturbing an idea as the idea of hiring arsonists to be firefighters because they, I guess, know a lot about fire?” Giridharadas said.
For people at the top who earnestly want to change the world for the better, he argued that they must be willing to “tak[e] a little bit less” and give back in ways that don’t also profit them personally or their businesses. Instead of telling women to “lean in” and constantly chasing “innovative” solutions, he said, they should accept the costs of giving everyone maternity leave and paying them more.
“The reality is, we’ve had a tremendous amount of innovation over the last 40 years,” Giridharadas said. “Half of Americans, the bottom half of Americans, 117 million Americans, literally got no more money in their paycheck as a result of 40 years of innovation. We don’t have an innovation shortage, we have a progress shortage.”
You can listen to Recode Decode wherever you get your podcasts, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Pocket Casts and Overcast.
Below, we’ve shared a lightly edited full transcript of Kara’s conversation with Anand.
Kara Swisher: Today in the red chair is Anand Giridharadas, the former foreign correspondent and columnist for the New York Times, who has also written for the Atlantic, New Republic and the New Yorker. He’s also the author of several books, and his most recent is called “Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World.” I love that title. Anand, welcome to Recode Decode.
Anand Giridharadas: I’m so excited to be here.
So, talk to me. I want to talk about your book. Because you were just joking that I said you had a lot of fans. You said as long as you’re not a billionaire, essentially, you’re not. But they don’t like you.
But, let’s talk a little bit about your background first and how you got to this. Because this is a topic that I think is really important. The idea. It’s great — Bezos just gave the $2 billion to homeless — things like that. What they’re doing in the world ... what these very elite and wealthy people are doing.
But let’s talk a little bit about how you got to this topic. So, give me your five-second resume. Not five seconds, but how did you get to be interested in this topic?
Well, I always wanted to be a writer, from high school onward, and became a journalist when I was 22 for the New York Times, in India. I had actually grown up in the U.S., in Ohio and Maryland. My parents were Indian immigrants. I got some advice from Jill Abramson, who was a mentor of mine, when I did a little internship at the New York Times.
She was the editor of the New York Times, yeah?
She was not, at the time.
Yeah.
She was like an editor in Washington. Then she gave me an internship when I was in high school. And, after college, she kind of gave me a piece of advice about, “Don’t just hang out outside the building, trying to get in. Go out into the world, see something, have experiences that people don’t know about, so you have something to write about.”
So, I actually kind of reversed my parents’ immigrant journey after college and moved to India, where I’d never lived, and worked for McKinsey, which will come up again in the story, for a year, because it’s the only entity in the world that will take a European history major from the University of Michigan and ...
“You’re smart, get over here.”
... send them to India to go advise a pharmaceutical company. Which I did.
For which you are uniquely qualified.
Well, pretending to know that I knew anything about India or pharma, or ...
Yeah.
But a lot of other people were pretending too, so it’s fine. And happily got out of that within a year and became a journalist for the Times, and wrote about this transformation of modern India for four or five years.
At the end of that, wrote a book, and realized that book writing was really what I wanted to do. So, “Winners Take All” is the third of my books now. It originated after I’d come back.
What were the first two?
So, the first one is called “India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation’s Remaking.” It was all about ... It’s interesting, given where we’re gonna go in this conversation. It was all about the transformation of modern India, but told through five families living through it, regular families. The richest man in India was one of them, then the rest were, you know, kind of regular people.
That story was really about one of the most ancient and traditional societies on Earth very rapidly being upended by the opening of market forces. The globalization, the world kind of pouring into India in a very fast period of time. It was a very celebratory book, in a way, about what all of that did to what was for many Indians a very oppressive social structure. All these girls and women who were degraded by their families and told that they could never do anything, suddenly a job comes into town offering five times [more] money than the father ever made, and the father says, “Okay, maybe I change my mind. Maybe women should work.”
You have these small towns — I wrote about a lot of people in small towns [who] are very interesting to me, who were the nth generation of people told by the caste system in India, “You’re a bricklayer, your dad was a bricklayer, your grandfather was a bricklayer.”
“You will be a bricklayer.”
And you had these kids. One guy said to me, he said, “Do you realize TV is the best education?” I was raised to think the opposite. He said, “Yeah, but where I come from, everything on TV is the best in the world. If you see someone catching an anaconda” — this is the actual example he gave me — “If you see someone catching an anaconda on TV, they’re the best person in the world at catching an anaconda.” And he said, “When you’re from a little village in India and you see the best person in the world at everything, doing everything, it just raises your sights.” And he said, “I knew I had to get out of this town.”
So, I told the stories of people really breaking the fundamental idea of Indian culture, in many ways, which is that you kind of preserve the past and each generation kind of replicates and continues heritage. Instead, all these people were self-inventing, or becoming their own people. It was like this revolution of millions of little Gatsbys, with all of the promise and all of the potential darkness that that entails.
Then, in 2009, I came back to this country. Attempted to go to grad school, and that was not a very good match, so I dropped out of that. I’m one of those dropouts that did not become a billionaire, unfortunately. But, I dropped out nonetheless.
I started to be very interested in this great bifurcation of America. I had told this very optimistic story about India, and about, in some ways, something like the American dream coming to India. Then I came back in 2009, and it seemed like the American dream had deserted America.
It had. That’s exactly when it did, right then.
It was very weird, particularly with that ... My family left India precisely because this was a place you could come to dream and realize your hopes. The place they came from wasn’t, and this weird reversal just really haunted me, and kind of became ...
It’s still on a tear.
It is. And with lots of problems, and of ...
So is France. But go ahead, we won’t get into that.
A lot of places are on a tear. You know, particularly when we’re not.
I mean creative and innovatively.
Right. By the way, I grew up in France also for a few years in there, when I was a kid.
I was looking to tell the story of this great bifurcation. Because what I felt very strongly was — and all the stories you do are evidence of this — American decline is not a generalized decline, right? Britain has had a generalized decline, right? Spain has had a generalized decline. The best parts of America, the best institutions, areas, people, are as good as they’ve ever been. The parts of this country that are high-functioning are as high-functioning as they’ve ever been. And that’s a pretty large part of this country.
It is.
The problem is, the rest of the country has basically descended into being a second-world country instead of a first-world country.
Yeah. I talk about this all the time. The bottom.
And it’s maddening. And that’s what’s really different, I think. So, I became very interested in ways of telling that story. In 2011, I still had a New York Times column and I was looking for a column idea. I know you know the feeling. And I think I was on… [more]
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13 days ago by heapdump
Mac Power Users #450: MPU+:I'm a Big Phone Guy - Relay FM
Mac Power Users -

This month in MPU+ we chat about David's new phone, Katie's broken Mac, iOS 12 follow-up, Siri Shortcuts, transitioning from Dropbox to iCloud, David's laptop replacement and more.

This episode of Mac Power Users is sponsored by:

The Omni Group We're passionate about productivity for Mac, iPhone and iPad.

Gazelle Sell your iPhone for cash at Gazelle!

Freshbooks: Online invoicing made easy.

Handy: The most reliable name in house cleaning.

Links and Show Notes

Support Mac Power Users with a Relay FM Membership

Sparky's 5 Minute Review of the iPhone Xs Max - YouTube

David can't stop using Memoji. Never!

OmniFocus Field Guide, Third Edition | MacSparky Field Guides

Apple - Joint Venture

Use 1Password to fill and save on your iPhone and iPad

Free Driving Directions, Traffic Reports & GPS Navigation App by Waze

How to Trigger IFTTT Applets with iOS 12’s New Shortcuts App and Siri – MacStories

CARROT Weather for iOS and Android

How to understand the amazing new battery info in iOS 12 | Cult of Mac

Tim Cook opens up about what's next for Apple, live on 'GMA' Video - ABC News

Moom · Many Tricks

Window Management with Keyboard Maestro and Screencast — MacSparky
Podcast  Mac  Power  Users 
20 days ago by Frunsman

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