symbolic_interaction   13

Erin Wais - Trained Incapacity: Thorstein Veblen and Kenneth Burke | KB Journal (2006)
Erin Wais, University of Minnesota -- Abstract: Recently, a leading sociologist claimed that the phrase “trained incapacity” does not appear in the works of Thorstein Veblen. Kenneth Burke, who attributed the phrase to Veblen in Permanence and Change, was later unsure of its origins. This essay shows that, indeed, Veblen did coin the term, using it particularly in reference to problematic tendencies in business. Burke, on the other hand, gave the term an expansive application to human symbol-using generally. -- see very interesting discussion of "screens" in Darwin and neo-Darwinism evolutionary_biology downloaded as pdf to Note
article  social_theory  economic_sociology  economic_culture  epistemology-social  Veblen  Burke_Kenneth  epistemic_closure  change-social  symbolic_interaction  evolutionary_biology  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Stob, Review: John McGowan, Pragmatist Politics: Making the Case for Liberal Democracy (2012) | KB Journal - 2013
McGowan, John. Pragmatist Politics: Making the Case for Liberal Democracy. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012. -- Paul Stob, Department of Communication Studies, Vanderbilt University -- John McGowan’s Pragmatist Politics draws upon the pragmatist tradition—primarily the work of William James, John Dewey, and Kenneth Burke—to formulate a liberal democratic politics for the twenty-first century. At least that’s the overt aim of the book. But what may stand out most to readers of KB Journal is how McGowan seems intent on crafting an attitude. In formulating a pragmatist politics, McGowan fails to explicate political programs and initiatives, he disregards the nuts and bolts of democratic negotiation, and he provides no real strategies for building grassroots coalitions. What he does—and what he does admirably—is present readers with a pragmatist attitude that will, he hopes, come to permeate public culture. -- Stob describes how McGowan links rhetoric and political philosophy, especially using Burke's "comic" frame as fitting a pragmatist approach to goals and public participation of liberal democracy -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  liberalism  liberal_democracy  rhetoric-political  conversation  persuasion  Burke_Kenneth  Dewey  James_William  secularism  symbolic_interaction  symbols-political  symbols-religious  communication  community  individualism  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacqueline Low - Structure, Agency, and Social Reality in Blumerian Symbolic Interactionism: The Influence of Georg Simmel | JSTOR: Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Summer 2008), pp. 325-343
Mead no doubt had a manifest influence on Blumer's thinking, and Blumer's acknowledgment of his indebtedness to Mead is a central feature of Blumer's writing. While I do not presume to question the importance Blumer assigns to the role played by Mead in the development of Blumerian symbolic interactionism, I argue that the perspective also owes much to the insights of Georg Simmel. In particular, a Simmelian flavor is evident in how Blumer addresses the core sociological issues of the nature of social reality, the nature of the relationship between the individual and society, and the nature of social action. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Germany  Simmel  Mead  symbolic_interaction  constructivism  action-social  agency-structure  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Antony Puddephatt - The Search for Meaning: Revisiting Herbert Blumer's Interpretation of G.H. Mead | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 40, No. 1/2 (March-June 2009), pp. 89-105
Herbert Blumer's interpretation of George Herbert Mead's work has set the intellectual foundation for the symbolic interactionist tradition. However, the adequacy of this interpretation has been challenged, leading to a series of highly charged debates in the 1970s—80s. This article reflects back on these debates, and reconsiders the contrast between the Blumerian and Meadian epistemologies from a contemporary perspective. It is demonstrated that while Mead's work is able to adapt to and contribute to emerging challenges to dualism in contemporary interpretive theory, Blumer's root epistemological position fails in this regard, and creates an inconsistent framework for social reality. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  intellectual_history  20thC  pragmatism  Mead  symbolic_interaction  epistemology  epistemology-social  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrea Salvini - Symbolic Interactionism and Social Network Analysis: An Uncertain Encounter | JSTOR: Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 33, No. 3 (Summer 2010), pp. 364-388
The aim of this article is to respond to the question of whether social networks represent a possible terrain of application and investment for interactionist research. The answer to that question is, without a doubt, affirmative. What appears to be truly problematic, if not completely improbable, is that this investment can come about through a "coming together" of symbolic interactionism and social network analysis. The vocational focus that has evolved in the two perspectives, the conceptual frameworks and methods used for the study of social interactions and their interlinking in relational networks, presents aspects of extreme differentiation that render a possible convergence quite difficult. -- Keywords social networks, social network analysis, vocational focus, social interactions
article  jstor  social_theory  networks-social  symbolic_interaction 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Norman K. Denzin, review essay - Postpragmatism: Beyond Dewey and Mead | JSTOR: Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Winter 1994), pp. 453-463
Reviewed work: Continual Permutations of Action, by Anselm L. Strauss. Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter, 1993. 280 pp., $44.95 (cloth), $21.95 (paper). -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  20thC  pragmatism  Dewey  Mead  symbolic_interaction  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Dieter Bögenhold - Social Network Analysis and the Sociology of Economics: Filling a Blind Spot with the Idea of Social Embeddedness | JSTOR: The American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Vol. 72, No. 2 (APRIL, 2013), pp. 293-318
Today, social networks analysis has become a cross-disciplinary subject with applications in diverse fields of social and economic life. Different network designs provide different opportunities to communicate, to receive information, and to create different structures of cultural capital. Network analysis explores modes and contents of exchanges between different agents when symbols, emotions, or goods and services are exchanged. The message of the article is that social network analysis provides a tool to foster the understanding of social dynamics, which enhances recent debate on a micro-macro gap and on limitations of the cognitive and explanatory potential of economics. -- paywall -- large references list quite interesting
article  jstor  social_theory  economic_theory  economic_sociology  networks-social  structure  social_order  social_capital  cultural_capital  symbolic_interaction  markets  microfoundations  rationality-economics  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Francesca Polletta, Pang Ching Bobby Chen, Beth Gharrity Gardner and Alice Motes - The Sociology of Storytelling | JSTOR: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 37 (2011), pp. 109-130
In contrast to the antistructuralist and antipositivist agenda that has animated the "narrative turn" in the social sciences since the 1980s, a more uniquely sociological approach has studied stories in the interactional, institutional, and political contexts of their telling. Scholars working in this vein have seen narrative as powerful, but as variably so, and they have focused on the ways in which narrative competence is socially organized and unevenly distributed. We show how this approach, or cluster of approaches, rooted variously in conversational analysis, symbolic interactionism, network analysis, and structuralist cultural sociologies, has both responded to problems associated with the narrative turn and shed light on enduring sociological questions such as the bases of institutional authority, how inequalities are maintained and reproduced, why political challengers are sometimes able to win support, and the cultural foundations of self-interest and instrumental rationality. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall
article  jstor  social_theory  narrative  narrative-contested  social_movements  political_culture  media  social_order  socialization  identity  structure  poststructuralist  symbolic_interaction  conversation  networks-social  institutions  memory-group  self-interest-cultural_basis  opposition  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Joseph R. Gusfield: On Legislating Morals: The Symbolic Process of Designating Deviance - JSTOR: California Law Review, Vol. 56, No. 1 (Jan., 1968), pp. 54-73
On Legislating Morals: The Symbolic Process of Designating Deviance
Joseph R. Gusfield
California Law Review
Vol. 56, No. 1 (Jan., 1968) (pp. 54-73)
Page Count: 20 - 58 references

Revision and expansion of Moral Passage: The Symbolic Process in Public Designations of Deviance, Social Problems,Vol. 15, No. 2 (Autumn, 1967) (pp. 175-188) - Abstract - The fact of public affirmation of a norm through law and government action expresses the public worth of one sub-culture vis-à-vis others. Because different forms of deviance affect that normative status in different ways, they incur different responses from the designators. Three forms of deviance are disinguished: repentant, sick, and enemy. One form threatens the public affirmation of the norm more than another. The public definition of deviance undergoes changes from one form to another, as illustrated in issues of drinking control. Where consensus on the norm is lacking and deviants become enemies, movements for legal restrictions are most likely. It is not the frequency of deviant acts but the symbolic import of deviance for the status of the norm which is determinative of these reactions.
social_theory  sociology  moral_psychology  norms  deviance  morality-conventional  law  legitimacy  symbolic_interaction  enemies  sub-cultures  culture  culture_wars  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Antony Puddephatt - The Search for Meaning: Revisiting Herbert Blumer's Interpretation of G.H. Mead | The American Sociologist, Vol. 40, No. 1/2 (March-June 2009), pp. 89-105
The Search for Meaning: Revisiting Herbert Blumer's Interpretation of G.H. Mead
Antony Puddephatt
The American Sociologist
Vol. 40, No. 1/2, John Kitsuse, Interpretive Sociology and Pragmatism (March-June 2009) (pp. 89-105)
Page Count: 17
Downloaded pdf to Note --

Herbert Blumer's interpretation of George Herbert Mead's work has set the intellectual foundation for the symbolic interactionist tradition. However, the adequacy of this interpretation has been challenged, leading to a series of highly charged debates in the 1970s—80s. This article reflects back on these debates, and reconsiders the contrast between the Blumerian and Meadian epistemologies from a contemporary perspective. It is demonstrated that while Mead's work is able to adapt to and contribute to emerging challenges to dualism in contemporary interpretive theory, Blumer's root epistemological position fails in this regard, and creates an inconsistent framework for social reality.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  20thC  pragmatism  symbolic_interaction  constructivism  Mead  epistemology  ontology-social  dualism  philosophy_of_science  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Aaron Beim: The Cognitive Aspects of Collective Memory | Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 30, No. 1 (Winter 2007), pp. 7-26
The Cognitive Aspects of Collective Memory
Aaron Beim
Symbolic Interaction
Vol. 30, No. 1 (Winter 2007) (pp. 7-26)
Downloaded pdf to Note

While these conceptions [from research to date] provide powerful frameworks for thinking about group remembrance, they describe exclusively institutional manifestations of collective memory. There are two characteristics of current collective memory research that account for this phenomenon. First, collective memory researchers assume that collective memory is collective only if it is institutionalized; they argue implicitly that collective memory is discernible only in institutionalized objects. Second, collective memory analyses conflate the production of the object and its reception. Objects are analyzed both in terms of their development as cultural objects (Griswold 1986) and in terms of their representativeness of the memory of a given population.

While these conceptions of collective memory are insightful, they preclude the analysis of both collective memory sui generis and the mechanisms of collective memory’s production and reception. I contend that we can undertake these types of analysis by including the cognitive processes that produce schemata that define the past.
article  jstor  social_theory  social_psychology  cognition  collective_memory  lit_survey  bibliography  methodology  institutionalization  sociology-process  symbolic_interaction  culture  cognition-social  cultural_objects  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Gary Alan Fine and Aaron Beim - Intro to issue: Interactionist Approaches to Collective Memory | Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 30, No. 1 (Winter 2007), pp. 1-5
Introduction: Interactionist Approaches to Collective Memory Gary Alan Fine and Aaron Beim Symbolic Interaction Vol. 30, No. 1 (Winter 2007) (pp. 1-5) Downloaded pdf to Note [M]uch of the analytic value in the concept of collective memory is found in its reification.A reified notion of the group mind allows us to analyze patterns of social thought that adhere at a level of social life that transcends the individual, just as long as such a strategy does not neglect the individuals and groups that are conse- quential in establishing memory through reputation work. Although a substantive focus that reifies memory flattens out individual or even group-level behavior, it can reveal behavior patterns that affect individuals and groups even in the absence of their intentions. Ultimately, collective memory is produced through symbolic interaction. Even if collective memory is treated as a reified concept, interactionism is a necessary para- digm for examining how that objectification operates. The articles in this special issue isolate mechanisms of that process.
article  jstor  social_theory  symbolic_interaction  collective_memory  sociology-process  cognition-social  public_opinion  media  institutionalization  methodology  levels_of_analyis  reputation  cultural_objects  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Gary Alan Fine : The Sad Demise, Mysterious Disappearance, and Glorious Triumph of Symbolic Interactionism | Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 19 (1993), pp. 61-87
Very useful intellectual history and status of sociology theory streams, research programs,cross boundary links, borrowings etc-- downloaded pdf to Note The Sad Demise, Mysterious Disappearance, and Glorious Triumph of Symbolic Interactionism Gary Alan Fine Annual Review of Sociology Vol. 19, (1993) (pp. 61-87) Page Count: 27 Symbolic interactionism has changed over the past two decades, both in the issues that practitioners examine and in its position within the discipline. Once considered adherents of a marginal oppositional perspective, confronting the dominant positivist, quantitative approach of mainstream sociology, symbolic interactionists find now that many of their core concepts have been accepted. Simultaneously their core as an intellectual community has been weakened by the diversity of interests of those who self-identify with the perspective. I examine here four processes that led to these changes: fragmentation, expansion, incorporation, and adoption. I then describe the role of symbolic interactionism in three major debates confronting the discipline: the micro/macro debate, the structure/agency debate, and the social realist/interpretivist debate. I discuss six empirical arenas in which interactionists have made major research contributions: social coordination theory, the sociology of emotions, social constructionism, self and identity theory, macro-interactionism, and policy-relevant research. I conclude by speculating about the future role of interactionism.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  lit_survey  20thC  social_theory  pragmatism  Mead  constructivism  microfoundations  methodology  causation-social  agency-structure  networks  organizations  self  identity  emotions  sociology  society  social_sciences-post-WWII  postmodern  feminism  meaning  symbolic_interaction  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader

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