shopping_experience   13

Imagining the Retail Store of the Future
APRIL 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By ELIZABETH PATON.

What will the store of the future look like? Gleaming robots using facial recognition technology to personalize sales pitches to mood or past spending preferences? Voice-activated personal assistants, downloading the availability, color and fit of any and every garment to your smartphone? 3-D printing stations? No checkout counters when you leave? Holographic product displays on the shop floor that change when a customer walks by? Virtual fitting rooms via virtual reality headsets? Drones dropping deliveries in the backyard or on the front steps?.......is this the sort of shopping experience that customers really want?
Scores of leading retailers and fashion brands increasingly say no.........Farfetch — the global online marketplace for independent luxury boutiques — held a daylong event at the Design Museum in London. There, in front of 200 fashion industry insiders and partners, José Neves, the founder of Farfetch, unveiled “The Store of the Future,” a suite of new technologies developed by his company to help brands and boutiques bridge the worlds of online and offline.......A report by Bain suggests that although 70 % of high-end purchases are influenced by online interactions, stores will continue to play a critical role, with 75 % of sales still occurring in a physical location by 2025.

What may change, however, is a store’s primary purpose. Forget e-commerce, or bricks and mortar, or even omnichannel sales; according to Mr. Neves, the new retail era is one anchored in “augmented retail,” a blend of the digital and physical allowing a shopper to shift seamlessly between the two realms.....Holition is an augmented-reality consultancy and software provider based in London that has worked with some well-known retail brands.......“The holy grail for retailers is creating digital empathy....No one knows what the future will look like....those using technology and data to create bespoke personalized shopping experiences...are more likely to come out on top.”.....boutiques and physical events remained vital “marketing opportunities,” with a more specialized inventory selection and the opportunity for customers to do more than buy merchandise......talks, film screenings and designer meet-and-greets, along with social media lessons, exercise classes and floristry sessions.......“Stores cannot just be row after row of product rail anymore,” he added. . “To survive, they have to tell stories — rooted in a sense of community and entertainment — and have points of view that makes the owner stand out.”.......“Ultimately the use of data to transform stores will separate those who make it to the next step and those who won’t.
reimagining  retailers  physical_place  shopping_malls  cashierless  e-commerce  reconceptualization  future  shopping_experience  brands  fashion  omnichannel  bricks-and-mortar  MatchesFashion  Holition  Yoox  facial-recognition 
february 2018 by jerryking
Kenneth Cole on keeping retail fashionable in a modern age
Nov. 2, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON.

About a year ago, your company announced the closing of all but two of your stores in the United States. Why?

The retail model needs to be re-imagined. We're looking to focus on the brand experience in the virtual universe, and then recreate a new physical experience.

How much of your sales in the future do you envision coming from the brick-and-mortar space?

Everyone is trying to figure it out. The shopping experience needs to be very different. It's happening really fast. It will be an interesting time. A lot of people will not survive it. At the end of the day, you'll have a stronger, more efficient marketplace.

More than three decades into the business, how has your view of advertising changed?

In the past, my goal was to sell my brand. Over the past five years, it seems everybody is their own brand – they wake up every day and curate it on their Facebook, their Twitter feed, their Instagram feed. My goal is to hopefully convince you to allow me to be part of your brand. All of that is changing.
Kenneth_Cole  brands  Susan_Krashinsky  retailers  fashion  bricks-and-mortar  cause_marketing  advertising  store_closings  shopping_experience  physical_experiences 
november 2017 by jerryking
The End of the Impulse Shopper - WSJ
Nov. 25, 2014 | WSJ |By SHELLY BANJO and SARA GERMANO.

An endangered species in the retail landscape is the ''impulse buy''...grocery shoppers are becoming more intentional and this is paving the way for more innovation in physical and digital merchandising.....Many Americans have the money and the will to spend. But they are time-pressed and deal savvy, visiting stores only when they run out of items like cereal or toilet paper and after doing extensive research on purchases online and with friends. They buy what they came for—and then leave. Those habits threaten more than just gum sales at checkout. Impulse is why stores offer deep discounts on loss leaders, why they put the milk in the back corner and why marketers spend heavily to pile up products in displays at the ends of the aisles. If shoppers just target the deals and don’t let their eyes wander, long cherished models for boosting sales fall apart...the symptoms of the industry’s malaise are clear enough: extended declines in shopper traffic, weak sales growth, and a discount-driven race to the bottom that is sapping pricing power.
impulse_purchasing  bricks-and-mortar  retailers  grocery  supermarkets  habits  discounting  shopping  shopping_experience  Turnstyle  intentionality  discretionary_spending  loss_leaders  foot_traffic  merchandising  frugality  decline  symptoms  endangered  time-strapped 
january 2015 by jerryking
Online shopping forces malls to evolve to keep customers coming back - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Sep. 24 2014
Marina_Strauss  e-commerce  shopping_experience  shopping_malls 
september 2014 by jerryking
Retailers compete with Amazon: Lowes Foods
July 11, 2014 | CNBC | Kristina Yates.

"What do we do to survive?" That's the No. 1 question branding expert Martin Lindstrom gets from his clients, brick-and-mortar stores.

Lindstrom's answer: entertainment. Create an "in-store sensory experience, and a sense of community, that can't be packaged and delivered by mail, or perhaps by drone in the future," "We have five senses that we can appeal to. When you go to Amazon, you have a maximum of appealing to two senses."

Appealing to all the senses is a concept that Lowes Foods, a 99-location grocery chain across the Carolinas and Virginia, is embracing wholeheartedly. The company hired Lindstrom and his team to give its traditional stores a makeover.
......
The store in Clemmons, North Carolina—ground zero for the chain's reinvention of the grocery shopping experience—doesn't look like a traditional supermarket. On the outside, it looks more like a greenhouse. On the inside, it's a mix of farmer's market and theme park.

"It's an experience. It feels like a destination, like we're going to Disneyworld," said long-time customer Mike Parnitzke.

Lindstrom hired writers from Walt Disney to create a storyline throughout the store. The most visual and unique example of that philosophy is the "Chicken Kitchen," where each chicken is celebrated with a chicken dance when it comes out of the rotisserie oven. Then there's "Sausageworks," which looks like a crazy laboratory complete with a crazy sausage professor, concocting whacky sausage flavors like the "Star Spangler," a bacon cheddar cheeseburger sausage for the Fourth of July. The "Beer Den" lets customers sample local draft beers. There's also the community table, hosting events from recipe sharing to speed dating.

"It's really about finding a connection with the guest. To have them come back and say, 'Oh my gosh, I had so much fun here in your store,'" said store manager Kate Allred...... brick-and-mortar stores have to create a memorable experience if they want to retain customers. "Brick-and-mortar stores are not necessarily going away," she said, "but we know that 20 percent of all specialty retail spending is done online."

According to the Food Marketing Institute, consumers spent $5.8 billion online grocery shopping in 2012. It's an industry that is attracting heavyweights like Amazon and Wal-Mart, and already has established players like Peapod.com, Freshdirect.com and Harris Teeter.

"You can't compete on volume, you can't compete on prices because the online retailer will always win," said Lindstrom.

Lowes Foods' new, rebranded store has seen basket size rise 7 percent and transaction volume increase 23 percent since January, the grocer says.
.
The company is remodeling 10 more stores this year, but Lindstrom said the work doesn't stop when the makeover is done. "This is like a sand castle. It's beautiful day one, day two it starts to fall apart. To communicate that to an organization of 10,000 people, and in some cases a million people, is pretty hard. It has to go through the system."
.....

The company's hiring pool has also changed. "If we can go look, for example, at local schools of arts, schools of theater, let's go find some folks who can go through and play the role and actually take care of our guests, and we can teach them the grocery industry," Lowe said.
retailers  grocery  supermarkets  branding  Lowes_Foods  digital_media  shopping_experience  web_video  contra-Amazon  experiential_marketing  e-commerce  Amazon  Disney  theme_parks  in-store 
july 2014 by jerryking
Smile, you're on WiFi
January 31, 2014
That cellphone in your pocket is emitting a constant stream of information - and retailers are starting to listen in

Ivor Tossell

Mexia, a Winnipeg-based "location analytics" company that's one of a new crop of firms that are supplying retailers with technology that listens in to smartphone signals. Mexia installs Bluetooth and WiFi receivers in specific zones around a store. By measuring the occurrence and relative strength of your phone's passive, unwittingly sent signals, it can tell whether customers are lingering longer in the housewares department, the kitchen aisle or near the checkout. The company says it has deployed sensors in between 80 and 100 stores so far; it also does malls and airports. "We report on a multitude of things, from the traditional traffic count to the time spent in the store," says Glenn Tinley, Mexia's founder and president. "It gets pretty interesting, to say the least."
wi-fi  Bluetooth  mobile_phones  location  location_based_services  tracking  Mexia  Turnstyle  customer_loyalty  shopping_experience  privacy  analytics  confidentiality 
february 2014 by jerryking
Amazon's Greatest Weapon: Jeff Bezos's Paranoia - WSJ.com
Nov. 13, 2013 | WSJ | By Farhad Manjoo.

What could Mr. Bezos possibly have to fear? Impermanence. Mr. Bezos is in an industry, retail sales, in which every innovation is instantly pored over and copied, in which (thanks partly to him) margins are constantly driven to zero, and in which customers are governed by passing fancy and whim. Being online confers fantastic advantages to Amazon, but it also comes at a deep cost: Very little about its business is burned into customers' minds.

Hence, frenzy: Amazon is in a race to embed itself into the fabric of world-wide commerce in a way that would make it indispensable to everyone's shopping habits—and to do so before its rivals wise up to its plans
Amazon  contra-Amazon  e-commerce  Fedex  habits  impermanence  Jeff_Bezos  network_effects  paranoia  retailers  shopping_experience  speed  staying_hungry  tradeoffs  transient  UPS  USPS  whims  shopping_habits 
november 2013 by jerryking
Deliverance
July/August 2006 |ATLANTIC MAGAZINE|By Corby Kummer.

The future of shopping for fresh fruits and vegetables
organic  shopping  future  fruits  vegetables  farmers'_markets  online_groceries  supermarkets  Whole_Foods  shopping_experience  locavore  e-commerce  CSA  warehouses  FreshDirect 
july 2012 by jerryking
How Super Is Your Market? - WSJ.com
March 1, 2005 | WSJ | By ADAM HANFT.

"I'd have to say that there are several intersecting explanations for the deep crisis gripping the supermarket category.

Industries are self-selecting in terms of the leadership they attract, and the grocery industry has long been populated by conservative management that is resistant to change and innovation. They took their customers for granted, and relied on manufacturers to innovate with new products, seeing themselves as basically commodity transaction points whose responsibility was to stock the shelves, mist the lettuce, and collect the carts from the parking lot.

This lack of marketing sophistication and a consumer-driven approach screams at us from the entire supermarket buying experience. (What other industry rewards those who spend less, which is what the 10 items or less Express Lane does?)

Food shopping should be a variety of entertainment, which is something that Whole Foods understands. Its merchandising should combine elements of adventure and discovery in a tactile and sensual environment. But consider the clinical drabness of the supermarket, and think how long it's been that way: Step inside your average supermarket, if you wanted to convince yourself that you're in 1964 instead of 2004, you could. Meanwhile, retailers in general -- from Old Navy to even Home Depot -- have defined the shopping experience for stimulation-craved, ADD shoppers.

Another massive failure is that supermarkets don't invest in building their brand -- their marketing is entirely price-driven. "
supermarkets  bankruptcies  Winn-Dixie  Nielsen  leadership  marketing  price-driven  self-selecting  Whole_Foods  shopping  shopping_experience  grocery  customer_experience 
july 2012 by jerryking
(Re)born to Be Wild
Jan 1, 2006 | Inc.com | By Donna Fenn. Schwartz wasn't
thinking of his business as just a Harley dealership anymore. It would
be a tourist destination, like Hershey's Chocolate World or Legoland.
"In the retail world, the big shift in the '90s was from selling a
product to selling an experience. it wasn't about getting the customers
in the door, it was about how we treated them once they were here."
Resources:
(1) Otis Hackett, a sales consultant who specializes in motorcycle
dealerships and helped Schwartz figure out how to sell motorcycles.
(2) Mike Rubin, president of MRA International, a Philadelphia
consulting firm that helps clients develop leisure, sports, and retail
projects. Also, a prominent land-use attorney; signed on a former New
Castle County economic development director to help him with the land
use and development process; Jack Rouse Associates, a Cincinnati
designer of themed entertainment attractions.
motorcycles  Harley-Davidson  dealerships  shopping_experience 
december 2009 by jerryking
Building a Better Bra Shop
November 30, 2003 | The New York Times | By HOPE REEVES. In
the two unfocused groups, IDEO invited the women -- about eight to a
group -- to talk about their good and bad experiences, which amounted to
very few in the first category and a long list in the second, then the
groups broke up into smaller units to build their ideal
underwear-shopping experience. In this segment, the women who acted as
customers expressed a desire to be advised and reassured by the women
acting as salespeople. And those salespeople responded as instructed,
producing a giggly lovefest that seemed to leave everyone satisfied and,
at least in this fantasy world, purchasing an expensive undergarment or
two.

IDEO digested this load in a series of meetings and mingled them with
brainstorming sessions conducted with technology, design and product
experts. The analysts presented their findings to Warnaco a few weeks
ago and are now entering the prototype phase.
IDEO  design  Warnaco  shopping_experience  underwear  lingerie  intimate_apparel  unfocused  prototyping 
november 2009 by jerryking

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