settler_colonies   7

Duncan Bell - Reordering the World: Essays on Liberalism and Empire. (2016) | Princeton University Press
Reordering the World is a penetrating account of the complexity and contradictions found in liberal visions of empire. Focusing mainly on 19thC Britain—at the time the largest empire in history and a key incubator of liberal political thought— Bell sheds new light on some of the most important themes in modern imperial ideology. The book ranges widely across Victorian intellectual life and beyond. The opening essays explore the nature of liberalism, varieties of imperial ideology, the uses and abuses of ancient history, the imaginative functions of the monarchy, and fantasies of Anglo-Saxon global domination. They are followed by illuminating studies of prominent thinkers, including J. A. Hobson, L. T. Hobhouse, John Stuart Mill, Henry Sidgwick, Herbert Spencer, and J. R. Seeley. While insisting that liberal attitudes to empire were multiple and varied, Bell emphasizes the liberal fascination with settler colonialism. It was in the settler empire that many liberal imperialists found the place of their political dreams. -- Duncan Bell is Reader in Political Thought and International Relations at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Christ's College. His books include The Idea of Greater Britain: Empire and the Future of World Order, 1860–1900 (Princeton). Intro downloaded to Tab
books  kindle-available  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_Empire-military  liberalism  IR_theory  colonial_governance  settler_colonies  imperialism  intellectual_history  competition-interstate  uses_of_history  national_origins  Anglo-Saxons  Mill  Sidgwick  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  imperialism-critique  monarchy  hegemony 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Alan Greer - Commons and Enclosure in the Colonization of North America | American Historical Review
On Junto March Madness list - The American Historical Review (2012) 117 (2): 365-386. doi: 10.1086/ahr.117.2.365 - WHAT WERE THE BROAD PROCESSES by which settlers of European stock created new forms of tenure and wrested control of lands from indigenous peoples, first in the Americas and later across wide stretches of Africa and Oceania? Anyone interested in this basic question about colonization and dispossession in an Atlantic world setting may be tempted to think in terms of a great “enclosure movement” that took shape first in England and Western Europe and then extended overseas to the New World, bringing survey lines, fences, and legal rules fostering exclusive access and transferability. More than one historian has pointed in the direction of such an extended conception of enclosure, although none has so far made the case in detail. (...) In relation to the 18thC and 19thC, EP Thompson has also pointed to a connection between enclosure within England and the imposition of private property across the overseas British Empire, notably in India, where the Permanent Settlement of Bengal (1793) represented a particularly brutal and doctrinaire attempt to establish unitary proprietorship over land. Thompson's argument about enclosure and colonization appeared in an essay published late in his life, (...). Richly suggestive, it remains schematic and preliminary, pointing to a long‐term global movement to privatize the commons that emanated outward from the British Isles. Certainly, there is an intriguing, if rough, coincidence of peak periods of enclosure in England—the Tudor period and the late 18thC—with times of imperial expansion and reinvigoration. - good tour d'horizon of lit on settler colonialism as well as East Asia property relations creation - and different takes on Locke - downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_history  social_history  legal_history  British_Empire  settler_colonies  property  property_rights  commons  enclosure  property-confiscations  North_America  American_colonies  Australia  New_Zealand  India  India-British_Empire  political_economy  political_history  historiography  Locke-2_Treatises  natural_law  natural_rights  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  downloaded 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
David Wheat - Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570-1640 (2016) | UNC Press
This work resituates the Spanish Caribbean as an extension of the Luso-African Atlantic world from the late sixteenth to the mid-seventeenth century, when the union of the Spanish and Portuguese crowns facilitated a surge in the transatlantic slave trade. After the catastrophic decline of Amerindian populations on the islands, two major African provenance zones, first Upper Guinea and then Angola, contributed forced migrant populations with distinct experiences to the Caribbean. They played a dynamic role in the social formation of early Spanish colonial society in the fortified port cities of Cartagena de Indias, Havana, Santo Domingo, and Panama City and their semirural hinterlands. David Wheat is the first scholar to establish this early phase of the "Africanization" of the Spanish Caribbean two centuries before the rise of large-scale sugar plantations. With African migrants and their descendants comprising demographic majorities in core areas of Spanish settlement, Luso-Africans, Afro-Iberians, Latinized Africans, and free people of color acted more as colonists or settlers than as plantation slaves. These ethnically mixed and economically diversified societies constituted a region of overlapping Iberian and African worlds, while they made possible Spain's colonization of the Caribbean. -- David Wheat is assistant professor of history at Michigan State University
books  16thC  17thC  Spanish_Empire  Portugal  Spanish_Caribbean  settler_colonies  African_trade  migration-Early_Modern  ports  slavery-Africans 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Eacott - Selling Empire: India in the Making of Britain and America, 1600-1830 (2016) | UNC Press
Linking four continents over three centuries, Selling Empire demonstrates the centrality of India--both as an idea and a place--to the making of a global British imperial system. In the seventeenth century, Britain was economically, politically, and militarily weaker than India, but Britons increasingly made use of India’s strengths to build their own empire in both America and Asia. Early English colonial promoters first envisioned America as a potential India, hoping that the nascent Atlantic colonies could produce Asian raw materials. When this vision failed to materialize, Britain’s circulation of Indian manufactured goods--from umbrellas to cottons--to Africa, Europe, and America then established an empire of goods and the supposed good of empire. Eacott recasts the British empire's chronology and geography by situating the development of consumer culture, the American Revolution, and British industrialization in the commercial intersections linking the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. From the seventeenth into the nineteenth century and beyond, the evolving networks, ideas, and fashions that bound India, Britain, and America shaped persisting global structures of economic and cultural interdependence. -- Jonathan Eacott is associate professor of history at the University of California, Riverside.
books  economic_history  British_Empire  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  colonialism  settler_colonies  South_Asia  North_America  West_Indies  slavery-Africans  commerce  consumer_revolution  consumer_demand  East_India_Company  American_colonies 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Noeleen McIlvenna - The Short Life of Free Georgia: Class and Slavery in the Colonial South | UNC Press
For twenty years in the eighteenth century, Georgia--the last British colony in what became the United States--enjoyed a brief period of free labor, where workers were not enslaved and were paid. The Trustees for the Establishment of the Colony of Georgia created a "Georgia experiment" of philanthropic enterprise and moral reform for poor white workers, though rebellious settlers were more interested in shaking off the British social system of deference to the upper class. Only a few elites in the colony actually desired the slave system, but those men, backed by expansionist South Carolina planters, used the laborers' demands for high wages as examples of societal unrest. Through a campaign of disinformation in London, they argued for slavery, eventually convincing the Trustees to abandon their experiment. In The Short Life of Free Georgia, Noeleen McIlvenna chronicles the years between 1732 and 1752 and challenges the conventional view that Georgia's colonial purpose was based on unworkable assumptions and utopian ideals. Rather, Georgia largely succeeded in its goals--until self-interested parties convinced England that Georgia had failed, leading to the colony's transformation into a replica of slaveholding South Carolina. -- Noeleen McIlvenna is associate professor of history at Wright State University and author of A Very Mutinous People
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  18thC  1730s  1740s  1750s  Georgia  colonialism  settler_colonies  slavery  labor_history  labor_standards  wages  Tories  Board_of_Trade  Parliament  planters  plantations  agriculture  hierarchy  elites  philanthropy  political_culture  economic_culture  American_colonies 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Mark G. Hanna - Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire, 1570-1740 (Nov 2015) | UNC Press
Analyzing the rise and subsequent fall of international piracy from the perspective of colonial hinterlands, Mark G. Hanna explores the often overt support of sea marauders in maritime communities from the inception of England's burgeoning empire in the 1570s to its administrative consolidation by the 1740s. Although traditionally depicted as swashbuckling adventurers on the high seas, pirates played a crucial role on land. Far from a hindrance to trade, their enterprises contributed to commercial development and to the economic infrastructure of port towns. English piracy and unregulated privateering flourished in the Pacific, the Caribbean, and the Indian Ocean because of merchant elites' active support in the North American colonies. Sea marauders represented a real as well as a symbolic challenge to legal and commercial policies formulated by distant and ineffectual administrative bodies that undermined the financial prosperity and defense of the colonies. Departing from previous understandings of deep-sea marauding, this study reveals the full scope of pirates' activities in relation to the landed communities that they serviced and their impact on patterns of development that formed early America and the British Empire. -- Mark G. Hanna is associate professor of history at the University of California, San Diego. -- cover is the portrait of the Earl of Warwick
books  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  West_Indies  North_America  Atlantic  colonialism  privateers  piracy  economic_history  maritime_history  settler_colonies  commerce  trade  Navigation_Acts  Board_of_Trade  East_India_Company  Indian_Ocean  Pacific  ports  maritime_law  commercial_law  Warwick_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  British_foreign_policy 
september 2015 by dunnettreader

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