research2.0   42

Mike Caulfield - Web Literacy for Student Fact Checkers
Mike Caulfield's "nstruction manual to reading on the modern internet." Fact checking, detecting bias, getting around as a web-literate person. Built with PressBooks.

> We’ll show you how to find pages that have been deleted, figure out who paid for the web site you’re looking at, and whether the weather portrayed in that viral video actual matches the weather in that location on that day. We’ll show you how to check a Wikipedia page for recent vandalism, and how to search the text of almost any printed book to verify a quote. We’ll teach you to parse URLs and scan search result blurbs so that you are more likely to get to the right result on the first click. And we’ll show you how to avoid baking confirmation bias into your search terms.

> In other words, we’ll teach you web literacy by showing you the unique opportunities and pitfalls of searching for truth on the web. Crazy, right?
OER  literacy  A&E  research2.0  pressbooks 
february 2017 by mcmorgan
I am a blogging researcher: Motivations for blogging in a scholarly context | Kjellberg | First Monday
The number of scholarly blogs on the Web is increasing. In this article, a group of researchers are asked to describe the functions that their blogs serve for them as researchers. The results show that their blogging is motivated by the possibility to share knowledge, that the blog aids creativity, and that it provides a feeling of being connected in their work as researchers. In particular, the blog serves as a creative catalyst in the work of the researchers, where writing forms a large part, which is not as prominent as a motivation in other professional blogs. In addition, the analysis brings out the blog’s combination of functions and the possibility it offers to reach multiple audiences as a motivating factor that makes the blog different from other kinds of communication in scholarly contexts.
DH  #en3177  blogging  research2.0  ethnography 
january 2016 by mcmorgan
Agile is Wrong for UX | Elisabeth Hubert
I'll take it a step further and say I am not convinced that agile is optimal for all software development; in part because rarely is there a vision and objective that is continually looked to throughout the developments cycles; often any bigger picture gets wiped away and the product is continuously being tweaked for the sake of being tweaked at a very tactical level. That's radically at odds with UX ...
agile  research2.0  rnd  from delicious
june 2012 by MicrowebOrg
Agile is Wrong for UX | Elisabeth Hubert
I'll take it a step further and say I am not convinced that agile is optimal for all software development; in part because rarely is there a vision and objective that is continually looked to throughout the developments cycles; often any bigger picture gets wiped away and the product is continuously being tweaked for the sake of being tweaked at a very tactical level. That's radically at odds with UX ...
agile  research2.0  rnd  from delicious
june 2012 by MikrowebOrg
Github for Research | trevorbedford : February 20, 2012
The basic paradigm of GitHub is the forking of a software project. I write some code, you take what I've done and make some additions. I then have the option of folding your changes back into my version, or if I'm not happy with your changes, the two versions continue on their separate ways. With something like a GitHub of Science, someone else could fork my canalization paper, code and all, and append a short section and figure on vaccination. I could choose to pull this addition, integrating it as part of the paper, or the forked version could exist on its own. Here, I'm imagining a scenario where most collaboration manifests as a network of fork and pull requests between co-authors, where a story emerges by combining a number of individual contributions.
vinnst  ununi  research2.0  from delicious
february 2012 by MicrowebOrg
Github for Research | trevorbedford : February 20, 2012
The basic paradigm of GitHub is the forking of a software project. I write some code, you take what I've done and make some additions. I then have the option of folding your changes back into my version, or if I'm not happy with your changes, the two versions continue on their separate ways. With something like a GitHub of Science, someone else could fork my canalization paper, code and all, and append a short section and figure on vaccination. I could choose to pull this addition, integrating it as part of the paper, or the forked version could exist on its own. Here, I'm imagining a scenario where most collaboration manifests as a network of fork and pull requests between co-authors, where a story emerges by combining a number of individual contributions.
vinnst  ununi  research2.0  from delicious
february 2012 by MikrowebOrg
Research Trove - Patients’ Online Data
Web site that allows patients to report information about their health, then turns those reports into databases that can be mined for observations about the disease.
Reading  Healthcare  Health2.0  Research2.0 
november 2011 by jgkim
Digital Breadcrumbs, Purdy and Walker
Framed in a google search clone. "We call for examining the ways in which researchers actually use online resources for scholarly projects rather than lamenting how these researchers are not following prescribed models of efficient, purposeful online research. We, in other words, seek to consider the value of researchers' existing practices. In this early research, we find that for the participant-researchers in this study:

Multiple online resources are used together in unadvertised, collaborative ways.
“Unstructured” online research can be inventional."
a&e  research  academia2.0  research2.0  mooc  ple 
may 2011 by mcmorgan
CoLab | Open Source Science
"CoLab is a platform designed for open and massively collaborative science."


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collaboration  collaborative  science  open-source  research  colab  openscience  open_source  research2.0  via:preoccupations  opensource  open  internet 
august 2010 by roomthily
With libraries closing, who will teach students to do research on the Internet?
"Before they graduate from high school, students need to be able to understand the phenomenal number of information options at their fingertips, learn how to work with non-Google-style search queries, avoid plagiarism and judge whether the facts before them were culled by an expert in the field or tossed off by a crackpot in the basement. ....They sometimes don't understand that these are discrete sites and systems. For them, the Internet is one big amorphous information universe....they have trouble formulating successful search queries and making sense of what they find....show students how to judge a Web site and how to avoid landing on bogus ones....study...how children think about information and technology. .... but we also need them to train students to manipulate search engines and databases, to think about them in a fresh way....basic research survival skills that are as important as reading, writing and math"
information_literacy  research2.0 
march 2010 by librnovus
Researchers of tomorrow – born digital? | Research Information Network
"A study tracking young doctoral student’s information-seeking behaviour ran a workshop yesterday to discuss the future of research in a digital age and how researchers are using new online tools.

It also looked at the issues posed by the rapidily changing landscape of scholarly communications technologies.

Funded by the British Library and JISC, this three year study on the research behaviour of the ‘Generation Y’ scholar is being undertaken by Education for Change, in collaboration with The Research Partnership

At the workshop, the RIN’s Liaison and Partnerships Officer, Branwen Hide discussed the way research is currently being undertaken and the possibilities for the future, particularly by using new digital technologies. Her presentation is available below or vist our Slideshare account.

Further information about the study is available on the Researchers of Tomorrow website."
research2.0  digital_literacy  information_seeking 
february 2010 by librnovus

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