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Spinoza Research Network - Home
The Spinoza Research Network was set up in 2008 and funded by an AHRC Networks Grant between 2008 and 2010 at the University of Dundee. The funded project focused on contemporary interdisciplinary connections to seventeenth-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza and built up a membership of over 200 members in Philosophy, Politics, Law, Literature, Music, Psychology, History, Medicine, Gender Studies, Education, and many other academic and non-academic disciplines.

The grant has now expired, but the Network continues as an interdisciplinary group of academics, students, and others interested in Spinoza around the world. Working together, sharing research and developing new projects, we investigate how Spinoza is used both within philosophy and beyond it, both inside and outside of academia.

As of 2013 the Network is based at the University of Aberdeen.
moral_philosophy  politics-and-religion  Hobbes  website  philosophy_of_religion  monism  immanence  logic  Spinoza  religious_belief  epistemology  metaphysics  bibliography  political_philosophy  Judaism  Descartes  17thC  religion-established  tolerance  history_of_science  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  scepticism  transcendence  intellectual_history 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus - Saeculum: History & Society in the Theology of St Augustine (1970, rev 2007) | Cambridge University Press
Significant intro to rev'd edition, included in downloaded frontmatter along with TOC and original Preface. -- In this book Professor Markus's main concern is with those aspects of Augustine's thought which help to answer questions about the purpose of human society, and particularly with his reflections on history, society and the Church. He relates Augustine's ideas to their contemporary context and to older traditions, and shows which aspects of his thought he absorbed from his intellectual environment. Augustine appears from this study as a thinker who rejected the 'sacralization' of the established order of society, and the implications of this for a theology of history are explored in the last chapter. -- Downloaded frontmatter, excerpt & index via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
books  downloaded  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_history  Late_Antiquity  Early_Christian  Augustine  human_nature  eschatology  social_order  Providence  teleology  religion-established  politics-and-religion  religious_culture  Roman_Empire  paganism  pluralism  secularism  Roman_religion  secularization  Papacy  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus The End of Ancient Christianity (1990) |Cambridge University Press
Highly recommended by Patrick Boucheron -- This study is concerned with one, central historical problem: the nature of the changes that transformed the intellectual and spiritual horizons of the Christian world from its establishment in the fourth century to the end of the sixth. Why, for example, were the assumptions, attitudes and traditions of Gregory the Great so markedly different from those of Augustine? The End of Ancient Christianity examines how Christians, who had formerly constituted a threatened and beleaguered minority, came to define their identity in a changed context of religious respectability in which their faith had become a source of privilege, prestige and power. Professor Markus reassesses the cult of the martyrs and the creation of schemes of sacred time and sacred space, and analyzes the appeal of asceticism and its impact on the Church at large. These changes form part of a fundamental transition, perhaps best described as the shift from "Ancient" toward "Medieval" forms of Christianity; from an older and more diverse secular culture towards a religious culture with a firm Biblical basis. -- Downloaded TOC, Preface & excerpt via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
books  downloaded  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Christianity  Roman_Empire  Late_Antiquity  Early_Christian  paganism  secularization  Roman_religion  pluralism  eschatology  Augustine  Gregory_the_Great  Church_history  Papacy  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
RB Outhwaite - The Rise and Fall of the English Ecclesiastical Courts, 1500–1860 (2007) | Cambridge University Press
The first history of ecclesiastical jurisdiction in England that covers the period up to the removal of principal subjects inherited from the Middle Ages. Probate, marriage and divorce, tithes, defamation, and disciplinary prosecutions involving the laity are all covered. All disappeared from the church's courts during the mid-nineteenth century, and were taken over by the royal courts. The book traces the steps and reasons - large and small - by which this occurred.
Downloaded 1st 10 pgs Ch 1 via Air
1. The ecclesiastical courts: structures and procedures
2. The business of the courts, 1500–1640
3. Tithe causes
4. Wills and testamentary causes
5. Defamation
6. Matrimonial litigation and marriage licenses
7. Office causes
8. The roots of expansion and critical voices
9. Charting decline, 1640–1830
10. Explaining decline
11. The Bills of 1733–1734
12. Snips and repairs: small steps to reform, 1753–1813
13. Royal commissions and early fruits, 1815–1832
14. Reform frustrated
15. Reforms thick and fast, 1854–1860.
books  downloaded  legal_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  Church_of_England  legal_system  church_courts  religion-established  family  marriage  jurisprudence  jurisdiction  inheritance  property  trusts  dispute_resolution  reform-social  reform-legal  morality-Christian  local_government  local_politics  discipline  punishment  authority  hierarchy  governing_class  governance-church  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Margins and Metropolis: Authority across the Byzantine Empire. (eBook, Paperback and Hardcover 2016) - Princeton University Press
1st volume of 2 covering her 40 year career - This volume explores the political, cultural, and ecclesiastical forces that linked the metropolis of Byzantium to the margins of its far-flung empire. Focusing on the provincial region of Hellas and Peloponnesos in central and southern Greece, Judith Herrin shows how the prestige of Constantinople was reflected in the military, civilian, and ecclesiastical officials sent out to govern the provinces. She evokes the ideology and culture of the center by examining different aspects of the imperial court, including diplomacy, ceremony, intellectual life, and relations with the church. Particular topics treat the transmission of mathematical manuscripts, the burning of offensive material, and the church's role in distributing philanthropy.

Herrin contrasts life in the capital with provincial life, tracing the adaptation of a largely rural population to rule by Constantinople from the early medieval period onward. The letters of Michael Choniates, archbishop of Athens from 1182 to 1205, offer a detailed account of how this highly educated cleric coped with life in an imperial backwater, and demonstrate a synthesis of ancient Greek culture and medieval Christianity that was characteristic of the Byzantine elite.

This collection of essays spans the entirety of Herrin's influential career and draws together a significant body of scholarship on problems of empire. It features a general introduction, two previously unpublished essays, and a concise introduction to each essay that describes how it came to be written and how it fits into her broader analysis of the unusual brilliance and longevity of Byzantium.

Judith Herrin is the Constantine Leventis Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s College London. She is the author of Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire, Women in Purple: Rulers of Medieval Byzantium, and The Formation of Christendom (all Princeton). -- downloaded Introduction to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  Byzantium  medieval_history  empires  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_culture  empires-governance  Islam  Islamic_civilization  ancient_Greece  Christianity  Christendom  elite_culture  urban_elites  rural  center-periphery  Orthodox_Christianity  Roman_Catholicism  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  manuscripts  iconoclasm  philanthropy  intelligentsia  church_history  theology  Islam-expansion  Christianity-Islam_conflict 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Philip Connell - MARVELL, MILTON AND THE PROTECTORAL CHURCH SETTLEMENT (2011) | Review of English Studies on JSTOR
CONNELL, PHILIP. "MARVELL, MILTON AND THE PROTECTORAL CHURCH SETTLEMENT." The Review of English Studies 62, no. 256 (2011): 562-93.
The question of church settlement was one of the most important—and intractable—issues faced by the Cromwellian Protectorate. This essay traces the literary response to the Protector's religious reforms in the poetry and prose of Andrew Marvell and John Milton. It confirms and extends our sense of their creative relationship during the mid-1650s as close, continued and reciprocal. But it also suggests that the two writers were fundamentally divided in their estimation of the Protectoral church. Milton's profound suspicion of that church was evident even at the height of his public support for Cromwell, in the Defensio Secunda. Marvell's The First Anniversary, in contrast, seeks to reconcile the older poet to the Protector's authority as godly magistrate and guarantor of 'sober Liberty'. Milton, however, was unpersuaded. His sonnet of 1655, 'Avenge O Lord', although closely connected to his official duties under the Protectorate, also intimates his deeply ambivalent attitude to Cromwell's self-appointed role as defender of the reformed faith. The essay begins and concludes by considering the extent to which their differences on ecclesiastical polity in the 1650s continued to inform the divergent positions assumed by Milton and Marvell in their responses to the first Restoration crisis, 20 years later.- 5-yr moving paywall
article  jstor  17thC  English_lit  British_history  British_politics  Church-and-State  Interregnum  Cromwell  Milton  Marvell  poetry  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  literary_history  religion-established  religion-and-literature 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Scriber eds. -Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation (1996) | Cambridge University Press
This volume offers a re-interpretation of the role of tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation. It questions the traditional notion of a progressive development towards greater religious toleration from the beginning of the sixteenth century onwards. Instead, it places incidents of religious tolerance and intolerance in their specific social and political contexts. Fifteen leading scholars offer a comprehensive interpretation of this subject, covering all the regions of Europe that were directly affected by the Reformation in the crucial period between 1500, when northern humanism had begun to make an impact, and 1648, the end of the Thirty Years War. In this way, Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation provides a dramatically different view of how religious toleration and conflict developed in early modern Europe. - excerpt is TOC and full Intro including ftnts - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Lutherans  persecution  politiques  social_movements  Huguenots  Erastianism  church_history  Europe-Early_Modern  change-social  Calvinism  religious_wars  heresy  Kirk  religion-established  books  legitimacy  Thirty_Years_War  networks-religious  Papacy  iconoclasm  Counter-Reformation  16thC  Church-and-State  anti-Calvinists  religious_history  godly_persons  Church_of_England  social_order  politico-theology  Wars_of_Religion  Socinians  downloaded  Arminians  religious_belief  Inquisition  religious_culture  17thC  religious_lit  Thirty-Nine_Articles  Reformation  tolerance  Puritans  heterodoxy 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Harro Hopfl - Jesuit Political Thought (2008) | Cambridge University Press
Harro Höpfl presents here a full-length study of the single most influential organized group of scholars and pamphleteers in early modern Europe (1540–1630), namely the Jesuits. He explores the academic and political controversies in which they were engaged in and their contribution to academic discourse around ideas of 'the state' and 'politics'. He pays particular attention to their actual teaching concerning doctrines for whose menacing practical implications Jesuits generally were vilified: notably tyrannicide, the papal power to depose rulers, the legitimacy of 'Machiavellian' policies in dealing with heretics and the justifiability of breaking faith with heretics. Höpfl further explores the paradox of the Jesuits' political activities being at once the subject of conspiratorial fantasies but at the same time being widely acknowledged as among the foremost intellects of their time, with their thought freely cited and appropriated. This is an important work of scholarship. -- Intro excerpt downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
16thC  Counter-Reformation  downloaded  resistance_theory  politico-theology  kindle-available  religious_history  political_philosophy  17thC  Absolutism  universalism  Erastianism  enlightened_absolutism  intellectual_history  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  Papacy  church_history  politics-and-religion  Church-and-State  Jesuits  books  authority  religion-established 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Ryu Susato - Hume's Advocacy of Religious Establishments | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (April 2012)
Taming "The Tyranny of Priests": Hume's Advocacy of Religious Establishments -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 2 (April 2012), pp. 273-293 -- excellent big bibliography, especially on reception of Hume and how his notions fit with other Scots -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  Hume-politics  Hume  Hume-religion  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Church_of_England  Kirk  tolerance  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Warburton  Enlightenment-conservative  clergy  priestcraft  enthusiasm  fanatics  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Job's Complaint in "Paradise Regained" (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Fall, 2009), pp. 625-660 - reading Milton’s commitment to separation of church and state, against a renewal of an integrated political theology, as also a message for the individual's relation with approaching the reading of scripture -- looks like a link between her work on Milton in Wayward Contracts and her vocal program against reading imperatives of a political theology back into secularization history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  English_lit  17thC  Milton  Restoration  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Bible-as-literature  Job  New_Testament  theodicy  justice  justification  Satan  political-theology  secularism  freedom_of_conscience  temptation  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Bourke, R.: Empire and Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke. (eBook and Hardcover)
Drawing on the complete range of printed and manuscript sources, Empire and Revolution offers a vivid reconstruction of the major concerns of this outstanding statesman, orator, and philosopher.In restoring Burke to his original political and intellectual context, this book strips away the accumulated distortions that have marked the reception of his ideas. In the process, it overturns the conventional picture of a partisan of tradition against progress. In place of the image of a backward-looking opponent of popular rights, it presents a multifaceted portrait of one of the most captivating figures in eighteenth-century life and thought. While Burke was a passionately energetic statesman, he was also a deeply original thinker. Empire and Revolution depicts him as a philosopher-in-action who evaluated the political realities of the day through the lens of Enlightenment thought, variously drawing on the ideas of such figures as Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Hume. A boldly ambitious work of scholarship, this book challenges us to rethink the legacy of Burke and the turbulent era in which he played so pivotal a role. -- Richard Bourke is professor in the history of political thought and codirector of the Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of Peace in Ireland: The War of Ideas and the coeditor of Political Judgement. -- Big early chunk on Vindication of Natural Society -- TOC and Intro (24 pgs) downloaded to Note
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september 2015 by dunnettreader
Hugh McLeod, Werner Ustorf, eds. - The Decline of Christendom in Western Europe, 1750–2000 (2003) | Cambridge University Press
EDITORS: Hugh McLeod, University of Birmingham and Werner Ustorf, University of Birmingham -- 1. Introduction, Hugh McLeod *--* 2. The secularisation decade: what the 1960s have done to the study of religious history, Callum G. Brown *--* 3. Christendom in decline: the Swedish case, Eva M. Hamberg *--* 4. New Christianity: indifference and diffused spirituality, Yves Lambert *--* 5. Established churches and the growth of religious pluralism: a case study of Christianisation and secularisation in England since 1700, David Hempton *--* 6. Catholicism in Ireland, Sheridan Gilley *--* 7. Long-term religious developments in the Netherlands, c. 1750–2000, Peter Van Rooden *--* 8. The potency of 'Christendom': The example of the 'Darmstädter Wort' (1947), Martin Greschat. *--* 9. The dechristianisation of death in modern France, Thomas Kselman *--* 10. The impact of technology on Catholicism in France (1850–1950), Michel Lagrée *--* 11. Semantic structures of religious change in modern Germany, Lucian Hölscher *--* 12. Master-narratives of long-term religious change, Jeffery Cox *--* 13. A missiological postscript Werner Ustorf.
books  kindle-available  religious_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  British_history  Christianity  Christendom  religious_culture  religious_belief  religion-established  Europe  Europe-19thC  Enlightenment  secularization  Catholics-English  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  pluralism  Germany  France  anticlerical  spirituality 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - Was Origen the Caitlyn Jenner of the Transabled? | The American Conservative - June 2015
I’m afraid I’m going to re-enter the fray. Rod Dreher has a piece today wondering whether the next step in our cultural development (or decline) will be the… Another superb piece by Millman illustrating how Dreher's hostility to changing cultural norms gets wrapped in a blanket condemnation of "modernity" (and liberalism, individualism, autonomy, and generally Enlightenment values) yet Dreher is committed to Enlightenment benefits of increased knowledge, and insists on liberalism's commitment to personal religious liberty. So it basically comes down to liberty for me but not for thee, with the Church authority for norm-setting both impervious to scientific and cultural change, and claiming an extension over those who don't recognize the Chyrch's authority. The example of Origen, whose spiritual commitment led to self-castration, and who wasn't condemned by the senior hierarchy (prior to the Church legislating on a range of norms dealing with the body and especially sexuality and gender, which was one reason Origen was never made a saint). Millman also has a lengthy passage from Tolstoy about a priest, sexual tension, spiritual demands and self-mutilation, with Tolstoy's final conclusion that this sort of psychological turmoil wasn’t the praiseworthy attitudes and action of a saint but self-absorbed cintra Christ's teaching. Tl; dr -- Dreher can't have it both ways (or in his case what seems like an ever-growing laundry list of contradictory ways). -- saved to Instapaper
Instapaper  sexuality  gender  gender-and-religion  norms  Early_Christian  theology  declinism  modernity  liberalism  Orthodox_Christianity  authority  individualism  autonomy  culture_wars  culture-American  cultural_change  cultural_authority  psychology  identity  biology  physiology  neuroscience  Tolstoy  religious_experience  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_liberties  bill_of_rights  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Schaich, ed. - Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in 18thC Europe (2007) - Oxford University Press
OUP/German Historical Institute London Studies of the German Historical Institute London -- 509 pages | 978-0-19-921472-3 | Hardback | This collection of essays is a pioneering survey of the spiritual dimensions of kingship in 18thC Europe. It investigates the role of clergymen in the mechanics of the court, the religious observances of monarchs and their entourages, and the importance of religious images and ceremonial in underpinning royal power. The volume compares the British, French, Russian, and some of the German monarchies in order to allow comparisons to be drawn between different national and especially confessional settings. Based on original research and new source material, the 15 essays by established scholars chart mostly unknown territory. Previous research on the subject has focused on the 16thC and 17thC at the expense of the age of Enlightenment which has widely been regarded as a period of desacralization of monarchy. The essays open up new perspectives on the function of court clerics, conspicuous and internalized forms of aulic devotion, the gendered framing of religion, the purpose of court ritual, and the divide between the public and private spheres of monarchy. Overall the essays maintain that despite the gradual decline of monarchy by divine right, religion still permeated almost all aspects of court life and monarchical representation. The volume thus challenges received wisdom about the disenchantment of kingship and the rise of more rationalized forms of absolutist government during the period between c.1688 and 1789. -- surprise, surprise, leads off with an "ancien régime" essay by JCD Clark
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april 2015 by dunnettreader
N.H. Keeble - The Restoration: England in the 1660s (2002) | Wiley Online Library
This cultural history challenges the standard depiction of the 1660s as the beginning of a new age of stability, demonstrating that the de following the Restoration was just as complex and exciting as the revolutionary years that preceded it. -- very large endnotes available as free access -- downloaded pdf to Air
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january 2015 by dunnettreader
Colin Kidd - Civil Theology and Church Establishments in Revolutionary America | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1007-1026
The discourse of America's founding generation, it is now widely recognized, was rich and variegated in its composition, drawing upon the commonwealth tradition, the English common law, Montesquieu, Locke, Scottish moral philosophy, and the classics. These sources yield significant clues as to how eighteenth-century Americans viewed religious liberty and church-state relations, subjects of the First Amendment to the Constitution. Supplementing the work of legal historians on the religious provisions of the early state constitutions, the study of political ideas suggests the parameters of the eighteenth-century debate over the effects which various types of religious belief and ecclesiastical establishment had upon manners and institutions. It also reveals the ideological underpinnings of the apparently inconsistent legal provisions for religion at the state level, and, far from settling the elusive question of `original intent', highlights the nature of the divisions within the founding generation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_religion  civil_liberties  tolerance  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  Founders  bill_of_rights  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Commonwealthmen  Locke-religion  Hutcheson  Smith  Montesquieu  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_legal_system  US_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Gerald Newman - Voltaire in Victorian Historiography | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 49, No. 4, On Demand Supplement (Dec., 1977), pp. D1345-D1359
Type script supplement - Page Count: 15 - emergence mid-century of freethought along with cultural and social critique of the smug, moralistic rising money-grubbing middle class - after Burke and the French Revolution the sort of scepticism of a Hume or Gibbon was hushed or condemned, and open freethinkers from Godwin to Mill were ostracized and attacked as immoral monsters. Newman thinks that the intellectual shift away from the post revolutionary moral straitjacket on social, religious and philosophical thought is well-known but hasn't focused on the roles of historiography in this shift of intellectual milieu, hence Voltaire and the Victorians. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  literary_history  historiography-19thC  19thC  English_lit  cultural_critique  British_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  religious_belief  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_authority  free-thinkers  Voltaire  Carlyle  Emerson  Dickens  Trollope  Bagehot  Stephen_Leslie  middle_class  atheism_panic  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Glenn Burgess, The Politics of the Ancient Constitution: An Introduction to English Political Thought, 1603-1642 | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 100, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 516-517
Helpful discussion of where Burgess fits within historiography debates, both with respect to the legal and political issues of the ancient constitution, (dominated by Pocock) and the broader "causes of the English Civil War" revisionism, anti revisionism, post revisionism etc. Burgess analyzes 3 different discourses each for a different sphere (e.g. king-in-parliament, prerogative, taxation and judicial review spoke the language of law and ancient constitution whereas religious sphere was a discourse of obedience). Major increase in tensions when a sphere (e.g. religious) deployed language from another sphere (e, g. divines advocating taxation in sermons). and juduc Main criticism by Hirst is Burgess significantly reduces the importance of Coke. On the positive side, Burgess explains the nearly universal consensus re significance of the ancient constitution, the common law and role of the judiciary and most of the monarch's prerogative powers. Hirst says Burgess has provided a framework for the consensus that gives a coherent foundation for distinctive key figures like Bacon and Selden. That serves to highlight where constructive ambiguity maintained consensus, where fault lines were hidden, where and how major conflicts emerged and a logic of the dynamics of how conflicts played out. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader

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