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[SOLVED] Replacing a RAID Hard Drive on an HP Proliant DL380 G7 Server - HPE Hardware - Spiceworks
NB this answer is for the G7 edition. ”Never turn off a hot-swap server to change drives. It really confuses the RAID controller because it doesn't see the "drive fail" event. Instead, it suddenly finds a missing disk and a foreign disk. I've broken HP arrays like this (on purpose to test). Ensure you have a good, tested backup. Then, hot-swap the drive.”
hp  work  sysadmin  reference  raid  hardware 
8 days ago by kr4d
5 Vital Things You Must Consider before RAID 5 Recovery
When your RAID 5 fails, you need to perform RAID recovery. Yet, before it, you had better figure out the 5 important things listed in this article. They can contribute to RAID 5 recovery a lot.
Clone  Drive  damaged  PST  Data  Recovery  Failed  Drives  RAID  5  Failure 
18 days ago by DataNumen
Choose a RAID Type | Synology Inc.
This article provides a brief overview of RAID types supported by Synology NAS, including implementation requirements as well as advantages and disadvantages.
Synology  RAID  knowledge-base  storage 
19 days ago by kOoLiNuS
What's a RAID array and why should I get one? | iMore
RAID? Like to kill ants? Nawp! Here's what RAID is and what it means to you.
I know, all I hear is the ant queen from the commercials too. But we're not talking about that kind of Raid; we're talking RAID. It's been around since the 80s, and you may have heard it tossed around if you've spent any time around PCs, but what does it mean and why does it matter to you now?
Welcome to the RAID parade.
What is RAID?
RAID stands for Redundant Array of Inexpensive/independent Disks. It was created in 1988 as a means to combat the rising cost of disk drives. The creators argued that a line of inexpensive disks could outperform one expensive one. Basically, it's a row of hard drives (an array!) that join together to perform like one macdaddy hard drive. It's basically the Voltron of hard drives.
You'll often hear RAID as it relates to network attached storage or "NAS". You know in movies when you see the "mainframe" and it's rows and rows of hard drives backing up all of the evil corporation's information? That's NAS, and that's RAID in action.
There are several iterations of RAID that have been created to solve for different issues. Some are still in use, while others have been abandoned. The main ones you need to worry about are RAID 0, RAID 1, and RAID 5.
RAID  storage  backup  guide 
29 days ago by rgl7194

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