progressive_era   7

Brad DeLong - Robber Barons: Honest Broker/Hoisted from 1998
Matthew Josephson called them 'Robber Barons'. He wanted readers to think back to their European history classes, back to thugs with spears on horses who did…
Instapaper  political_economy  economic_history  US_history  US_economy  US_politics  economic_growth  economic_policy  economy-structure  investment  19thC  20thC  pre-WWI  entre_deux_guerres  robber_barons  Gilded_Age  Progressive_Era  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
The Omaha Platform: Launching the Populist Party | History Matters - US History Survey - GMU
Although historians often speak of a “Populist movement” in the 1880s, it wasn’t until 1892 that the People’s or Populist Party was formally organized. The Omaha Platform, adopted by the founding convention of the party on July 4, 1892, set out the basic tenets of the Populist movement. The movement had emerged out of the cooperative crusade organized by the Farmer’s Alliance in the 1880s. The preamble was written by Minnesota lawyer, farmer, politician, and novelist Ignatius Donnelly. Delegates to the convention embraced the platform with great enthusiasm. Many of the specific proposals urged by the Omaha Platform—the graduated income tax, the secret ballot, the direct election of Senators, the eight-hour day—won enactment in the progressive and New Deal eras of the next century. Yet at least one historian has argued that the fundamental cooperative and democratic spirit of the agrarian radicals was lost along the way.
etexts  US_history  19thC  20thC  populism  parties  agrarian_interests  US_politics  reform-political  Progressive_Era  New_Deal  labor_standards  tax_policy  US_constitution  movements-political  democracy  representative_institutions  Gilded_Age  website 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Mike Konczal, review essay - Selling Fast: Public Goods, Profits, and State Legitimacy | Boston Review - November 10, 2014
Nicholas R. Parrillo, Against the Profit Motive: The Salary Revolution in American Government, 1780–1940, Yale University Press, $55 (paper) -- Dana Goldstein, The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, Doubleday, $26.95 (cloth) -- Radley Balko, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces, PublicAffairs, $17.99 (paper) -- Adam Smith was not the first, but he was certainly one of the most eloquent defenders of justice delivered according to the profit motive (..)since courts could charge fees for conducting a trial, each court would endeavor, “by superior dispatch and impartiality, to draw to itself as many causes as it could.” Competition meant a judge would try “to give, in his own court, the speediest and most effectual remedy which the law would admit, for every sort of injustice.” Left unsaid is what this system does to those who can’t afford to pay up. Our government is being remade in this mold—the mold of a business. The past thirty years have seen massive, outright privatization of government services. Meanwhile the logic of business, competition, and the profit motive has been introduced into what remains. But for those with a long enough historical memory, this is nothing new. Through the first half of our country’s history, public officials were paid according to the profit motive, and it was only through the failures of that system that a fragile accountability was put into place during the Progressive Era. One of the key sources of this accountability was the establishment of salaries for public officials who previously had been paid on commission.
books  reviews  kindle-available  US_government  US_society  governance  legitimacy  accountability  inequality  justice  privatization  US_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  competition  profit  Gilded_Age  Progressive_Era  civil_society  civil_liberties  US_constitution  Evernote  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
David H. Ciscel - The Living Wage Movement: Building a Political Link from Market Wages to Social Institutions | JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 34, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 527-535
Plus çà change - even in the good times of the 1990s boom, low wages were not keeping up with maintaining minimum living standards without supplemental government assistance -- Looks at attempts in late 1990s to build political pressure for an increased minimum wage - already the low end service sector was seeing growing between their stagnant wages and growing GNP, with gains going to upper cohorts. Special issues already including (1) service sector jobs with lots of women, so degraded status, (2) outsourcing of jobs that would have been low end civil service, reducing both pay and benefits plus job security. Gives a history of the periodic movements for defining minimum wage levels to incorporate the costs of reproducing the labor force, from health care, child care, nutrition etc. Early 20thC movement was for a "family wage" pushed by unions, but problems for feminists that the focus on family defined women's roles in the home as part of determining what employment should produce as base compensation for maintaining the family, with women's work uncompensated. Short article, didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  political_economy  economic_culture  US_economy  20thC  Progressive_Era  1990s  wages  wages-minimum  women-work  feminism  feminist_economics  unions  inequality  Democrats  productivity-labor_share  gender_gap  alliances-political  movements-political  US_politics  poor-working  poverty 
september 2014 by dunnettreader

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