philipguston   7

William Kentridge Interview: How We Make Sense of the World - YouTube
""There is a desperation in al certainty. The category of political uncertainty, philosophical uncertainty, uncertainty of images is much closer to how the world is", says South African artist William Kentridge in this video presenting his work.

"The films come out of a need to make an image, an impulse to make a film, and the meaning emerges over the months of the making of the film. The only meaning they have in advance is the need for the film to exist".

William Kentridge (b. 1955) is South Africa's most important contemporary artist, best known for his prints, drawings and animated films. In this video he presents his work, his way of working and his philosophy.

He tells the story of how he failed to be an artist:

"I failed at painting, I failed at acting, I failed at film making, so I discovered at the age of 30 I was back making drawings". It was not until he told himself he was an artist with all he wanted to included in the term - that he felt he was on the right track. "It took me a long time to unlearn the advice I had been giving. For for me the only hope was the cross fertilization between the different medias and genres."

William Kentridge talks about the origin of his animated films with drawing in front of the camera. "I was interested in seeing how a drawing would come into being". "It was from the charcoal drawing that the process of animation expanded". With charcoal "you can change a drawing as quickly as you can think".

"I am interested in showing the process of thinking. The way that one constructs a film out of these fragments that one reinterprets retrospectively - and changes the time of - is my sense of how we make sense of the world. And so the animated films can be a demonstration of how we make sense of the world rather than an instruction about what the world means."

"Uncertainty is an essential category. As soon as one gets certain their voice gets louder, more authoritarian and authoritative and to defend themselves they will bring an army and guns to stand next to them to hold. There is a desperation in al certainty. The category of political uncertainty, philosophical uncertainty, uncertainty of images is much closer to how the world is. That is also related to provisionality, to the fact that you can see the world as a series of facts or photographs or you can see it as a process of unfolding. Where the same thing in a different context has a very different meaning or very different form."

"I learned much more from the theatre school in Paris, Jacques Lecoq, a school of movement and mime, than I ever did from the art lessons. It is about understanding the way of thinking through the body. Making art is a practical activity. It is not sitting at a computer. It is embodying an idea in a physical material, paper, charcoal, steal, wood."

William Kentridge will work on a piece not knowing if it will come out as a dead end or a piece of art, giving it the benefit of the doubt, not judging it in advance, he says.

The artist has been compared to Buster Keaton and Gerorge Méliès. He mentions Hogarth, Francis Bacon, Manet, Philip Guston, Picasso, the Dadaists, Samuel Beckett and Mayakovski as inspirations.

"I am considered a political artist by some people and as a non-political artist by other political artists. I am interested in the politics of certainty and the demagoguery of certainty and the fragility of making sense of the world", William Kentridge states.

This video shows different excerpts from the work: 'The Journey to the Moon' (2003), 'The Refusal of Time' (2012) 'What Will Come (has already come)' (2007).

William Kentridge was interviewed by Christian Lund at the Deutsche Staatstheater in Hamburg in January 2014 in connection with the performance of the stage version of 'The Refusal of Time', called 'Refuse The Hour'."
williamkentridge  art  thinking  uncertainty  certainty  artists  provisionality  busterkeaton  georgeméliès  christianlund  therefusaloftime  accretion  process  making  filmmaking  philosophy  sensemaking  makingsense  unlearning  howework  howwethink  authoritarianism  chance  fortune  unschooling  deschooling  unknowing  hogarth  francisbacon  manet  philipguston  picasso  samuelbeckett  mayakovski 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Soul-Beating | Art Journal
I was a student at the New York Studio School during the fall of 1966 and spring of 1967. The school was then located in a loft building on the northeast corner of Broadway and Bleecker Street. Draft deferments during the Vietnam War were not granted to students attending an art school, especially an unaccredited one like the Studio School. But because I was still enrolled at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and came to New York on a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship, I was safe. I studied with Mercedes Matter, Charles Cajori, Esteban Vicente, and especially Milton Resnick, among others. Frank Stella, Gandy Brody, Alfred Leslie, and others gave talks at the school. It was quite an immersion in New York painting culture for an idealistic would-be-painter from San Diego.

After finishing my last year at Reed College in the fall of 1968, I returned to New York. Mercedes Matter gave me a job organizing the library at the Studio School’s new location, the old Whitney Museum building at 8 West Eighth Street. I bought books and organized them into categories. At the time, Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s essay “Cézanne’s Doubt” was a kind of bible to me. I was aware of the difficulties and contradictions involved in the study of painting and put up a sign with a quote from Paul Cézanne: “If you ever founded a school in my name, you have not understood nor even cared about what I have done.”[1] Morton Feldman was the dean in those years. In his lectures he often told stories about his friendship with Philip Guston. Even though I was no longer a student there, when Guston came to the school for a special group critique, Mercedes invited me to bring my paintings and later allowed me to join his special seminar.
philipguston  davidreed  art  artist  memoir 
february 2011 by ddotyddot

related tags

2010  2018  accretion  ambivalence  art  artist  artists  austinenglish  authoritarianism  authority  budfisher  busterkeaton  certainty  chance  china  christianlund  city  comics  corruption  culturalrevolution  dam  davidreed  dc  deschooling  displacement  ebook  environment  environmental  filmmaking  flood  fortune  francisbacon  georgegrosz  georgeharriman  georgeméliès  ghost  hogarth  howework  howwethink  ice  image  jeanettehayes  landscape  life  making  makingsense  manet  material  mayakovski  memoir  narrative  nationalgallery  newyork  ottodix  painting  philosophy  picasso  poetry  process  provisionality  reference  review  roylichtenstein  samuelbeckett  sensemaking  sherrielevine  study  suehiromaruo  text  therefusaloftime  thinking  tradition  transgression  uncertainty  unknowing  unlearning  unschooling  video  water  williamkentridge  yunfeiji 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: