nymag   1109

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12 Young People on Why They Probably Won’t Vote
More than half of American adults plan to cast ballots in November, but only a third of people ages 18 to 29 say they will. Here, 12 young adults on why they probably won’t vote.
democracy  millennials  personalaccount  disillusionment  apathy  politics  USA  NYMag  2018 
9 days ago by inspiral
The Making of Rockstar Games’ Red Dead Redemption 2
"Arguably, because Dan Houser and Grand Theft Auto III, Rockstar’s breakthrough hit, set the bar high for crime games, Amy Hennig (the Uncharted series) and Ken Levine (Bioshock) could raise it in other genres. “The Rockstar guys are just so good at making the world feel alive,” says Neil Druckmann, an award-winning game writer himself (The Last of Us), and the vice president of Naughty Dog, the studio behind the Uncharted series, which has sold many millions of copies. “Even just the beauty of riding a horse through gorgeous environments and having the light shifting — it feels so real.”"
rockstargames  nymag  vulture  culture  videogames  reddeadredemption2  rdr2  grandthefthorsey  storytelling 
28 days ago by danhon
Model Tinder-Scams Men for Date Competition in Union Square
The summer of scam has a new hero, and her name is Natasha Aponte. What did Ms. Aponte do to warrant this title? She used Tinder to con dozens of men into believing they were meeting her for a one-on-one date in Union Square. When the men arrived, they discovered that instead of a date … they’d be competing against each other to win it.
dating  scam  tinder  funny  nymag 
11 weeks ago by aeng
Jaron Lanier Interview on What Went Wrong With the Internet
One of the things that I’ve been concerned about is this illusion where you think that you’re in this super-democratic open thing, but actually it’s exactly the opposite; it’s actually creating a super concentration of wealth and power, and disempowering you. This has been particularly cruel politically. Every time there’s some movement, like the Black Lives Matter movement, or maybe now the March for Our Lives movement, or #MeToo, or very classically the Arab Spring, you have this initial period where people feel like they’re on this magic-carpet ride and that social media is letting them broadcast their opinions for very low cost, and that they’re able to reach people and organize faster than ever before. And they’re thinking, Wow, Facebook and Twitter are these wonderful tools of democracy.

But then the algorithms have to maximize value from all the data that’s coming in. So they test use that data. And it just turns out as a matter of course, that the same data that is a positive, constructive process for the people who generated it — Black Lives Matter, or the Arab Spring — can be used to irritate other groups. And unfortunately there’s this asymmetry in human emotions where the negative emotions of fear and hatred and paranoia and resentment come up faster, more cheaply, and they’re harder to dispel than the positive emotions. So what happens is, every time there’s some positive motion in these networks, the negative reaction is actually more powerful. So when you have a Black Lives Matter, the result of that is the empowerment of the worst racists and neo-Nazis in a way that hasn’t been seen in generations. When you have an Arab Spring, the result ultimately is the network empowerment of ISIS and other extremists — bloodthirsty, horrible things, the likes of which haven’t been seen in the Arab world or in Islam for years, if ever.
criticism  technology  virtual.reality  jaron.lanier  silicon.valley  internet  social.media  ****  nymag  algorithms 
july 2018 by gpe
How Social Science Might Be Misunderstanding Conservatives
Maybe things aren’t as simple as conservatives being more intolerant than liberals, they write. Maybe what’s really going on here is that one side views certain groups as opposed to their interests and beliefs, and the other side views other groups as opposed to their interests and beliefs, and both sides have a penchant for intolerance toward the groups they view as opposed to them. That is: Sure, conservatives are more intolerant than liberals of groups traditionally viewed as liberal — but what happens when you ask liberals about groups they often view as their ideological adversaries, like members of the military or fundamentalist Christians?
authoritarian  liberal  conservatives  comparison  research  critique  NYMag  2018 
july 2018 by inspiral
An Apology for the Internet — From the People Who Built It
Noah Kulwin, in NY Magazine: "If the tech industry likes to assume the trappings of a religion, complete with a quasi-messianic story of progress, the Church of Tech is now giving rise to a new sect of apostates, feverishly confessing their own sins. And the internet’s original sin, as these programmers and investors and CEOs make clear, was its business model."
nymag  internet  history  technology  addiction  socialmedia  internetculture 
may 2018 by warnick

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