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Big nutrition research scandal sees 6 more retractions, purging popular diet tips | Ars Technica
Thus, JAMA editors retracted the six articles.
Years of work

One had appeared in JAMA in 2005. The study claimed to find that large serving bowl sizes at a Super Bowl party were linked to more snack eating.

Three had been published in JAMA Internal Medicine. A 2012 study claimed that hungry people go for starchy foods first over vegetables. Another study in 2013 claimed similarly that hungry grocery shoppers go for more calories but not necessarily more food. And a study from 2014 was reported as finding that the more distracting a TV show, the less viewers watched how much they ate and thus ate more.

The last two retracted studies were from JAMA Pediatrics. One from 2008 suggested that kids who are told to clean their plates by their moms were statistically more likely to request more food. The other, published in 2013, claimed that kids made healthier school lunch choices if they pre-ordered their meals rather than made decisions in the lunch line, where they can smell less-healthy entrees.
diet  nutrition  science  fraud 
20 hours ago by Quercki
Are Pistachios Healthy? Here's What Experts Say
Pistachios are packed with vitamins, minerals and nutrients, including beta carotene, phosphorus, vitamin B6, thiamine, potassium, magnesium and fiber. Compared to other nuts, they are also high in carotenoids, a type of antioxidant that helps reduce the risk of chronic disease and improves heart health.You can also eat a lot of them in just one serving, which is one ounce, or 49 pistachios.Both raw and roasted pistachios contain a lot of fat: about 13 grams, which is 17% of the recommended daily total. But most of it is monounsaturated fat, a heart-healthy type that can help lower levels of bad cholesterol. Pistachios are also a good source of protein; a serving contains about 6 grams.“All nuts are healthy because they are a great source of plant-based protein, fiber, and healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat, nuts and seeds of all varieties can improve health.”But pistachios, more than other nuts, may also help reduce blood pressure, That’s due to their monounsaturated fatty acids, their phytosterols (plant compounds in the nut that can help lower cholesterol) and their high fiber.“They also contain lutein, beta-carotene, and tocopherols, which can reduce systemic inflammation... pistachios may act as a prebiotic, or food for your gut bacteria.
Time  food  healthy  Nutrition  Dietetics 
2 days ago by thomas.kochi
A top Cornell food researcher has had 13 studies retracted. That’s a lot. - Vox
Stopping an experiment when a p-value of .05 is achieved is an example of p-hacking. But there are other ways to do it — like collecting data on a large number of outcomes but only reporting the outcomes that achieve statistical significance. By running many analyses, you’re bound to find something significant just by chance alone.

According to BuzzFeed’s Lee, who obtained Wansink’s emails, instead of testing a hypothesis and reporting on whatever findings he came to, Wansink often encouraged his underlings to crunch data in ways that would yield more interesting or desirable results.

In effect, he was running a p-hacking operation — or as one researcher, Stanford’s Kristin Sainani, told BuzzFeed, “p-hacking on steroids.”

Wansink’s sloppiness and exaggerations may be greater than ordinary. But many, many researchers have admitted to engaging in some form of p-hacking in their careers.

A 2012 survey of 2,000 psychologists found p-hacking tactics were commonplace. Fifty percent admitted to only reporting studies that panned out (ignoring data that was inconclusive). Around 20 percent admitted to stopping data collection after they got the result they were hoping for. Most of the respondents thought their actions were defensible. Many thought p-hacking was a way to find the real signal in all the noise.
science  scam  nutrition  food 
2 days ago by craniac
Sugary Drinks, but Not Foods, Linked to Increased Mortality
Read into this with caution. This is a single study, although large scale and longitudinal. No cause & effect have been found; although there are hypotheses offered they are just that -- guesses as to what's going on. They do note that previous studies that found that all sugar consumption raise mortality risk, this is the first to look separately at food and drink.

While the increased risk of mortality itself is higher for those who are overweight or obese, there is no additional risk for CVD by weight.
fat  nutrition  research  article 
3 days ago by moose

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