network_attached_storage   25

OpenMediaVault
OpenMediaVault is the next generation network attached storage (NAS) solution based on Debian Linux. It contains services like SSH, (S)FTP, SMB/CIFS, DAAP media server, RSync, BitTorrent client and many more. Thanks to the modular design of the framework it can be enhanced via plugins.

OpenMediaVault is primarily designed to be used in home environments or small home offices, but is not limited to those scenarios. It is a simple and easy to use out-of-the-box solution that will allow everyone to install and administrate a Network Attached Storage without deeper knowledge.
raid  debian  server  backup  network_attached_storage  linux  nas 
july 2012 by thejasonparker
How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS -- Engadget
Ask Engadget: What's the best budget NAS? Kingston Wi-Drive for iOS hits stores today, lets you create your own portable music server for $130 Tilera sees sense in the server wars, puts just 36 cores in its newest processorIn today's digital world we've all got data, and lots of it. Our libraries are also growing rapidly: where you used to get by setting aside a few bookshelves for your books, CDs, DVDs and VHS tapes, we now require untold server space to preserve our beloved media in digitized form. We also want our data to be itinerant, or at least seem that way. That is, if you want to take a book or disc to another room of your abode, you pull it from the bookshelf and take it with you. Similarly, if you're working on a document upstairs on your desktop and you want to move to the den with your laptop, you'll need the proper infrastructure working in the background to enable that kind of wizardry. So, how can we create this "digital bookshelf?" Can you go out and buy it now? Can you build it in your garage? As it turns out, the answer is "yes" on all counts. You could go out and buy a Drobo device but in this case, we're going to assemble our own. And we're going to do that with the help of an open source storage platform called FreeNAS. So how involved a process is that? Meet us after the break to find out.Continue reading How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS
How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Feb 2012 15:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
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CIFS  FreeNAS  how_to  how-to  howto  NAS  network_attached_storage  NetworkAttachedStorage  samba  ZFS 
february 2012 by flobosg
How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS
Ask Engadget: What's the best budget NAS? Kingston Wi-Drive for iOS hits stores today, lets you create your own portable music server for $130 Tilera sees sense in the server wars, puts just 36 cores in its newest processorIn today's digital world we've all got data, and lots of it. Our libraries are also growing rapidly: where you used to get by setting aside a few bookshelves for your books, CDs, DVDs and VHS tapes, we now require untold server space to preserve our beloved media in digitized form. We also want our data to be itinerant, or at least seem that way. That is, if you want to take a book or disc to another room of your abode, you pull it from the bookshelf and take it with you. Similarly, if you're working on a document upstairs on your desktop and you want to move to the den with your laptop, you'll need the proper infrastructure working in the background to enable that kind of wizardry. So, how can we create this "digital bookshelf?" Can you go out and buy it now? Can you build it in your garage? As it turns out, the answer is "yes" on all counts. You could go out and buy a Drobo device but in this case, we're going to assemble our own. And we're going to do that with the help of an open source storage platform called FreeNAS. So how involved a process is that? Meet us after the break to find out.Continue reading How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS
How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Feb 2012 15:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments
how_to  how-to  howto  NAS  network_attached_storage  from google
february 2012 by splattne
How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS
Ask Engadget: What's the best budget NAS? Kingston Wi-Drive for iOS hits stores today, lets you create your own portable music server for $130 Tilera sees sense in the server wars, puts just 36 cores in its newest processorIn today's digital world we've all got data, and lots of it. Our libraries are also growing rapidly: where you used to get by setting aside a few bookshelves for your books, CDs, DVDs and VHS tapes, we now require untold server space to preserve our beloved media in digitized form. We also want our data to be itinerant, or at least seem that way. That is, if you want to take a book or disc to another room of your abode, you pull it from the bookshelf and take it with you. Similarly, if you're working on a document upstairs on your desktop and you want to move to the den with your laptop, you'll need the proper infrastructure working in the background to enable that kind of wizardry. So, how can we create this "digital bookshelf?" Can you go out and buy it now? Can you build it in your garage? As it turns out, the answer is "yes" on all counts. You could go out and buy a Drobo device but in this case, we're going to assemble our own. And we're going to do that with the help of an open source storage platform called FreeNAS. So how involved a process is that? Meet us after the break to find out.Continue reading How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS
How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Feb 2012 15:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments
CIFS  FreeNAS  how_to  how-to  howto  NAS  network_attached_storage  NetworkAttachedStorage  samba  ZFS  from google
february 2012 by shepler
Turn an Old Computer into a Networked Backup, Streaming, or Torrenting Machine with FreeNAS [Video]
At its most basic, Network attached storage, or NAS, is a great way to share files on your local network. But it's also a perfect solution for backing up your computers, streaming media across your home network, or even torrenting files to a central server. If you have an aging computer lying around, you can turn it into a NAS for for free with the open-source FreeNAS operating system. Here's how. More »
How_To  Backup  Clips  DIY  Feature  File_Sharing  Lifehacker_Video  Nas  Network_attached_storage  Networking  Server  Streaming_Video  from google
july 2011 by jimparker
Turn an Old Computer into a Networked Backup, Streaming, or Torrenting Machine with FreeNAS [Video]
At its most basic, Network attached storage, or NAS, is a great way to share files on your local network. But it's also a perfect solution for backing up your computers, streaming media across your home network, or even torrenting files to a central server. If you have an aging computer lying around, you can turn it into a NAS for for free with the open-source FreeNAS operating system. Here's how. More »
How_To  Backup  Clips  DIY  Feature  File_Sharing  Lifehacker_Video  Nas  Network_attached_storage  Networking  Server  Streaming_Video  Top  from google
july 2011 by hanicker
Turn an Old Computer into a Networked Backup, Streaming, or Torrenting Machine with FreeNAS [Video]
At its most basic, Network attached storage, or NAS, is a great way to share files on your local network. But it's also a perfect solution for backing up your computers, streaming media across your home network, or even torrenting files to a central server. If you have an aging computer lying around, you can turn it into a NAS for for free with the open-source FreeNAS operating system. Here's how.

First, we'll take a closer look at what exactly a NAS is and does, then jump into how to set it up. If you want to skip the first part, you can skip straight to the setup section.

What Is Network Attached Storage?
A Network attached storage box is a computer on your network specifically designed to store files. Any computer on the network can access files on a NAS, which makes them great for bigger households, and they're also nice for when you don't want to store a bunch of external drives on your desk. Unlike regular file servers, NAS units are usually built for a specific purpose, like backing up your data or streaming media to other machines. They're also usually quite low power and low cost, and they don't require a monitor, mouse or keyboard—once you've installed the software, you can configure every aspect of your NAS from a web browser on your other computers.

You can find pre-made NAS units for as low as one or two hundred dollars, and they usually come with their own software. However, if you have an old computer lying around, you can actually turn it into a NAS for free with the aptly-named FreeNAS software. It doesn't need much in terms or resources, any old computer will probably do. Alternatively, you can buy or build a very cheap nettop that fits the specifications of what you want to do (and even hide it in some nice-looking box from IKEA) You could even strip down a $50 PogoPlug and install FreeNAS on it. The bottom line is, there's no need to go out and buy a pre-built NAS when you can make one yourself with great, free, open source software and hardware you already have lying around.Heck, if you've got the money, you're better off spending on it on an extra hard drive than you are an entirely new machine.

Here, we'll show you how to set up FreeNAS on the computer of your choice, connect it to your other computers as if it were directly attached to them, and show you a few simple examples of how you could use it for backup, iTunes music streaming, or video streaming to a home theater PC. Photo by Andrew Currie.

Note: FreeNAS recently released a new version (version 8.0), we don't think it's quite ready for prime time yet. It's still missing a lot of the features that make FreeNAS great, so we're going to use the now-legacy version 7 of FreeNAS.
What You'll Need
You can install FreeNAS on a ton of different systems using a number of different methods, but here are the things you'll need for our method:

A PC with a minimum of 192MB RAM to act as your NAS. It will also need a bootable CD drive in it from which we can install FreeNAS onto one of its hard drives.
The FreeNAS live CD, available here (more details on that below).
A network with DHCP reservations or static IP addresses. This isn't required, but it's definitely preferred. If you don't have this, managing your NAS can get pretty annoying, since its IP address will change whenever you reboot it (as will your other computers').

FreeNAS is actually designed to run on a flash drive or compact flash card rather than one of the drives in your computer, but since many computers (especially older ones, like the one you might recycle into a NAS) don't support booting from USB, we're going to install FreeNAS to the hard drive for simplicity. If your computer supports booting from USB, you can actually use the live CD to install FreeNAS to a 2GB flash drive and run FreeNAS from that flash drive instead, keeping it plugged into your NAS at all times.

Installing FreeNAS
To install FreeNAS, you'll need the FreeNAS live CD. Head to this page and click on the latest stable build of FreeNAS 7. Download the live CD image that applies to you—that is, if your NAS has a 64-bit capable processor in it, grab the amd64 version. If not (or if you aren't sure), grab the i386 version. Burn it to disc using something like IMGBurn for Windows or Burn for Mac, and stick it into a computer (any computer, it doesn't matter if its your NAS or not).

Head over to your NAS box and boot up from the live CD. It'll take awhile to boot up, but once you get to the FreeNAS menu, pick option 9: "Install/Upgrade to hard drive/flash device". Pick option 2 on the next screen, "Install embedded OS on HDD/Flash/USB + DATA + SWAP partition" (if you're installing on a flash drive, you can pick option 1 instead). Pick your CD drive and hard drive from the lists it throws at you, and say no to a SWAP partition (unless your computer has less than a few gigs of RAM, in which case it might be a good idea to create a SWAP partition that's twice the size of the RAM in your machine). It will format your drive for you with the UFS file system, and install FreeNAS to a small partition at the beginning of the drive.

Remove the live CD and boot up your computer. You should boot into your new FreeNAS installation, and come up with the same menu the Live CD gave you. This time, pick option 1, "Assign Interfaces". Pick your ethernet port from the list (there's probably only one option), then pick "none, Finish and exit" on the next page. Next, pick option 2, "Set LAN IP Address". Using DHCP should be fine, unless you're using static IPs, in which case you can hit "no" and assign it an address yourself.

When you're done with all the network configuration, it should spit out an IP address for you. This is how you'll access the web interface to configure everything on your NAS, so make a note of it and head over to your desktop computer. You can now unhook the keyboard and monitor from your NAS; you won't need them anymore.

Sharing Your FreeNAS Drive with a Desktop Computer





One of the coolest features of FreeNAS is the ability to download torrents without the help of another computer. FreeNAS has a version of Transmission built right in that can watch folders for torrents and download them—you'll never have to worry about keeping your main computer on, logged in, or avoid rebooting it. Your NAS can download all those torrents for you.

To set up BitTorrent support, open up FreeNAS' web configuration and go to Services > BitTorrent. Click the Enable checkbox on the right hand side, and specify a Download Directory. This is where your completed torrents will go. Most of the other settings are fine, though I like to require encryption on the people to whom I connect, so you can tweak that setting if you want. If you want to set up a Watch Directory, that's probably a good idea too—that way, you can drop torrent files right into a specific folder on your NAS and it will immediately start downloading them. Hit Save when you're done.

The last thing you'll need to do is probably change your NAS' DNS servers, otherwise it won't be able to connect to the internet. Head to System > General and change the DNS servers to your ISPs, or, if you don't know them, you can just use Google's (8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4) since they're easy to remember. Hit Save when you're done.

When you start downloading a torrent, you can monitor it from a web interface by going to 192.168.1.10:9091, replacing my IP address with your NAS', of course. That way you can keep an eye on how far your torrents are coming along from any computer on your network.

These are just a few of the many things you can do with FreeNAS, so be sure to check out FreeNAS' web page for more info (as well as the Legacy Wiki, since the legacy version—the one we used in this tutorial—has even more features). Got a NAS setup in your home that you think is pretty awesome? Tell us about it in the comments.

You can contact Whitson Gordon, the author of this post, at whitson@lifehacker.com. You can also find him on Twitter, Facebook, and lurking around our #tips page.
How_To  Backup  Clips  DIY  Feature  File_Sharing  Lifehacker_Video  Nas  Network_attached_storage  Networking  Server  Streaming_Video  Top  from google
july 2011 by jimparker
Turn an Old Computer into a Networked Backup, Streaming, or Torrenting Machine with FreeNAS [Video]
At its most basic, Network attached storage, or NAS, is a great way to share files on your local network. But it's also a perfect solution for backing up your computers, streaming media across your home network, or even torrenting files to a central server. If you have an aging computer lying around, you can turn it into a NAS for for free with the open-source FreeNAS operating system. Here's how. More »
How_To  Backup  Clips  DIY  Feature  File_Sharing  Lifehacker_Video  Nas  Network_attached_storage  Networking  Server  Streaming_Video  Top  from google
july 2011 by pclaypool
Pogoplug Goes Software-Only with New UI, iOS Support
Pogoplug is well known for its all-in-one NAS device that you can just plug into the wall and configure wirelessly to back up your devices or store your data. The company just released a stand-alone version of the software that powers their Pogoplug devices, and it allows you to turn any computer into a glorified NAS with the Pogoplug interface. The software-only version is free, and includes some features not available on the Pogoplug hardware, including support for iOS devices like the iPad and iPhone, and an improved UI that lets you see all of your shared drives in a single view.
The most notable feature in the software-only version of Pogoplug is support for iOS devices. You can download the updated Pogoplug app from the iTunes App Store for iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad, and access shared files from any other device where the Pogoplug software is installed. The updated apps add support for systems where the Pogoplug desktop software is installed, and allow you to upload files from your iOS device to any Pogoplug device you have access to.
The Pogoplug desktop software also includes One View, a new UI that lets you see all of your shared folders and files in a single pane without having to tab between NAS devices or computers with the software installed. This way you can quickly get to the shared files or documents you’re looking for without having to search or click through devices and folders until you find the one you’re looking for.
All of the other features that Pogoplug owners are familiar with on their NAS devices are available in the software-only version. The real difference is that with the software you can turn any Mac or PC into an internet-connected NAS that can be accessed easily over the web.
Pogoplug is clearly taking aim at file sharing and syncing services like Dropbox and SugarSync with the new software. Previously you needed a Pogoplug NAS in your closet or on your desk to back up your files and share them over the web, but with the desktop app you can turn a desktop, laptop, or even an old computer stuffed with hard drives into a homegrown Dropbox that you can access anywhere. The software is free, and available to download now.
Computing  Internet  Mobile  cloud  nas  network_attached_storage  pogoplug  software  storage  from google
june 2011 by david3smith
Hands On: QNAP TS-419P+ NAS
The QNAP Home and SOHO NAS group has a new top-of-the-line model in the form of the TS-419P+.  Will this be your next backup and file server?
Network_Attached_Storage  Network_Attached_Storage_Reviews  News  Reviews  qnap  review  ts-419p+  from google
january 2011 by stateless
Iomega Personal Cloud devices host your data, not your water vapor
Finally, a new flavor of Iomega that the EMC fanboys can find palatable. The bigger company consumed the smaller back in 2008 and, while we've seen plenty of products since then, none have really brought the two together like the new Personal Cloud edition of the Home Media Network Hard Drives. In theory, anyway. The idea here is that this is a smart NAS, creating your own little puff and hosting your data for general availability but avoiding the "careless computing" curse by retaining control of your data. It'll naturally play nice with the new Iomega TV and, if you buy two of the things, you can have one perform an automated remote backup to the other. That's the sort of feature that should make a tight-budgeted IT manager's ears perk up. How tight? The first two models of Iomega's Home Media Network Hard Drive Cloud Edition devices launch this month: 1TB for $169.99 and twice that for $229.99.
Gallery: Iomega Personal Cloud press shots
Continue reading Iomega Personal Cloud devices host your data, not your water vapor
Iomega Personal Cloud devices host your data, not your water vapor originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 04 Jan 2011 11:22:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
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aes  ces  ces_2011  ces2011  cloud  cloud_storage  CloudStorage  emc  home_media_network  home_media_network_hard_drive  Home_Media_Network_Hard_Drive_Cloud_Edition  HomeMediaNetwork  HomeMediaNetworkHardDrive  HomeMediaNetworkHardDriveCloudEdition  iomega  nas  network_attached_storage  NetworkAttachedStorage  personal_cloud  PersonalCloud  from google
january 2011 by pclaypool
Seagate tosses 3TB hard drives into BlackArmor NAS, stores a digital boatload
It wasn't that long ago that an entire network attached storage box held just 3TB, but now that Seagate's reached that capacity with a single five-platter drive, the NAS are getting larger in turn. Though you can't buy a 3TB Barracuda XT all by its lonesome, you can today order four of them direct from Seagate in a BlackArmor NAS 440 with RAID 5, for the presumably reasonable price of $1,899. If that's too rich for your local area network's blood, however, we hear there'll also be a 6TB NAS 220 unit with a pair of disks for a penny under $650. Let's just hope the giant fan on the back of this box keeps those suckers cool.Continue reading Seagate tosses 3TB hard drives into BlackArmor NAS, stores a digital boatload
Seagate tosses 3TB hard drives into BlackArmor NAS, stores a digital boatload originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 03 Oct 2010 05:05:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
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hard_drive  HardDrive  HDD  NAS  network_attached_storage  Seagate  storage  from google
october 2010 by splattne
Homemade 16TB NAS dwarfs the competition with insane build quality (video)
From the man that brought you the OS Xbox Pro and the Cinematograph HD comes... a cockpit canopy filled with hard drives? Not quite. Meet the Black Dwarf, a custom network-attached-storage device from the mind of video editor Will Urbina, packing 16TB of RAID 5 magnetic media and a 1.66GHz Atom N270 CPU into a completely hand-built Lexan, aluminum and steel enclosure. Urbina says the Dwarf writes at 88MB per second and reads at a fantastic 266MB per second, making the shuttlecraft-shaped 12.7TB array nearly as speedy as an SSD but with massive capacity and some redundancy to boot. As usual, the DIY guru shot a professional time-lapse video of his entire build process, and this one's not to be missed -- it showcases some pretty spiffy camerawork as well as the man's welding skills. See sparks fly after the break.Continue reading Homemade 16TB NAS dwarfs the competition with insane build quality (video)
Homemade 16TB NAS dwarfs the competition with insane build quality (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 07 May 2010 04:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
Permalink Hack A Day  |  Will U. Design  | Email this | Comments
Atom_N270  AtomN270  Black_Dwarf  BlackDwarf  custom  DIY  do_it_yourself  do-it-yourself  DoItYourself  hack  hacks  Intel_Atom_N270  IntelAtomN270  mod  mods  N270  NAS  network_attached_storage  NetworkAttachedStorage  RAID  RAID_5  Raid5  storage  time-lapse  time-lapse_video  Time-lapseVideo  video  Will_Urbina  WillUrbina  from google
may 2010 by nicoska
Thecus debuts N3200 Pro NAS: now with more AMD Geode CPU
Filed under: Storage, Networking

Thecus Technology has retooled the N3200 and come up with the aptly named N3200 Pro -- a brand new NAS now featuring an AMD Geode CPU. The device boasts a veritable cornucopia of features, including three SATA drive bays for up to 3TB of storage, the option of RAID 5 striping, and an LCD display. Photo, iTunes and DLNA-compatible server options as well as browser-based management should assist users with the "digital lifestyle," while a feature called "Web Surveillance Server" allows you to take regularly scheduled photographs just by plugging in a USB webcam... which is interesting in a vaguely creepy way. No word on price or availability but the previous N3200 sells for $339.Thecus debuts N3200 Pro NAS: now with more AMD Geode CPU originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 29 Oct 2008 02:28:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
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n3200_pro  N3200Pro  nas  network_attached_storage  NetworkAttachedStorage  raid  thecus  googlereaderstarred  from google
october 2008 by egwillim

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