ncmideas   38

Can an exhibition be a story? | Fiona Romeo
"So story, in my experience, is a great device within exhibition design. But are exhibitions the best way to tell a story? Not often. Because visitors don’t visit every exhibit you either need a lot of redundancy in the delivery of the story, or it needs to be an entirely optional layer, which effectively sidelines it. And I think that’s why for both The Science of Spying and High Arctic, books followed. Cory Doctorow went on to write the young adult novel Little Brother and Nick Drake published his work in a volume of poetry, The Farewell Glacier.

My favourite example of museum storytelling is actually The Wellcome Collection’s The Phantom Museum, an anthology of stories, true and imagined, inspired by objects from Henry Wellcome’s collection. Each story starts with one object."

[See also: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2013-02/22/storytelling-in-museums ]
fionaromeo  museums  storytelling  experience  narrative  2013  objects  exhibitions  ncmideas 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Cardboard Planetarium — DIY star-gazing for kids! | PingMag : Art, Design, Life – from Japan
[Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/20130828205421/http://pingmag.jp/2013/08/16/cardboard-planetarium/ ]

"The Perseid meteor shower was recently visible in the sky. Did you see it? Finding the right time and place to spot the spectacle was a bit of a pain. In the summer holidays, many people want to see the stars but don’t have the money to go to a proper planetarium. If you are one of these people, did you know you can make a planetarium out of some unconventional materials?

At temperatures over 35 degrees Celsius, PingMag popped along to an elementary school gymnasium to watch a special kids’ workshop by Art Studio Asahigaoka, a group of art college students, teaching children to build a planetarium… out of cardboard boxes!"

[Another cardboard planetarium: http://astronomypchs.blogspot.com/ ]
pingmag  cardboard  ncmideas  architecture  decay  memory  2013  projectideas  children  astronomy  planetariums  artstudioasahigaoka  japan  diy 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Object Stories: Rejecting the Single Story in Museums | Art Museum Teaching
"Launched in March 2010, Object Stories invites visitors to record their own narratives about personal objects—whether a piece of clothing, a cherished record album, or a family heirloom. By capturing, honoring, and sharing participants’ stories, this project aims to demystify the Museum, making it more accessible, welcoming, and meaningful to a greater diversity of communities – while continuing to highlight the inherent relationship between people and things. Nearly one thousand people from throughout Portland—most of who had never before set foot in the Museum—have participated as storytellers in this project."



"Since 2010, the Object Stories concept has essentially evolved into a comprehensive educational platform for engaging audiences and forging community collaborations. The Museum has since extended Object Stories into a multi-year partnership with area middle schools that involves in-depth teacher professional development, artist residencies, and multiple visits to the Portland Art Museum that culminates in students’ own personal “object stories.” Further success has brought the Museum into a new international partnership with the Museo Nacional de San Carlos in Mexico City, and a more locally-focused proposed Object Stories project with the Native American Youth and Family Center in Portland. These outreach efforts will also bring the storytelling process outside of the Museum through a new mobile iPad application currently in development."
collections  museums  objects  audiences  ncmideas  storytelling  objectstories  projectideas  education 
august 2013 by robertogreco
TORAFU's Haunted Play House At The Museum Of Contemporary Art In Tokyo | Yatzer
"Some projects are so engaging and fun that you wish you could be a child again. The Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo is staging a summer exhibition for children entitled GHOSTS, UNDERPANTS and STARS and Torafu Architects (Koichi Suzuno, Shinya Kamuro) have created the most stunning and imaginative Haunted House ever."

[See also: http://torafu.com/ ]
ncmideas  art  children  hauntedhouse  museums  torafuarchitects  tokyo  glvo 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Medical Museion | Biohacking forside
"Medical Museion is currently hosting an open biohacking laboratory, pieced together from recycled furniture, IKEA cabinets, and cheap “hacked” instruments made by do-it-yourself biologists from BiologiGaragen and Hackteria. At a series of hands-on events and discussions, visitors are invited to step inside the world of practical biotechnology, and encounter the dreams and realities of open science.

This is an online version of the exhibition where you can also find photos, video and press coverage. Click on the titles below to explore:"
medicalmuseion  biohacking  ncmideas  hacking  events  openstudioproject  lcproject  hackerspaces  makerspaces  citizenscience  biologigarden  hackteria  biology  science  biotech  biotechnology 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Erica Scourti
"Erica Scourti was born in Athens, Greece in 1980 and now lives in London. After a year studying Chemistry at UCL, an art and fashion foundation and a year of Fine Art Textiles at Goldsmiths, she completed her BA in Fine Art at Middlesex University in 2003 and has just completed (June 2013) a Research degree (Masters) in Moving Image Art at Central Saint Martin’s College of Art & Design, run in conjunction with LUX. Her area of research was the figure of the female fool in performative video works and the mediated subject of networked capital.

She works with video, performance, online and with text, and has shown internationally at the Museo Reine Sofia, Kunstmuseum Bonn and Jeu de Paume Museum, as well as festivals such as Recontres Internationales and Impakt as well as extensively in the UK, most recently at Banner Repeater, Grand Union, New Bridge Project, Enclave, ICA

She has completed residencies at Can Serrat International Arts Centre, Barcelona, I-Park Artists’ Enclave, USA; LOW&HIGH, Folkestone, UK, LABA film workshop, Athens, Vermont Studio Center, USA (April 2012), and at The Guesthouse, Cork (September 2012) ."
ericascourti  ncmideas  art  artists  video  performance  text  newmedia  online  internet  web  socialmedia  communication  mediation  networkedcapital  openstudioproject 
august 2013 by robertogreco
From Here to There | the art of asking for directions | Spoon & Tamago
Outfitted in a souvenir baseball cap and Century 21 shopping bag, Japanese artist Nobutaka Aozaki hits the streets of Manhattan, asking strangers for directions wherever he goes. However, Aozaki is not a tourist nor does he have a horrible sense of direction. This is “From Here to There,” an ongoing art piece in which Aozaki is constructing a map of Manhattan based on hand-drawn directions people create for him.

“Sometimes my destinations come from Japanese guide books but other times they’re just where I’m headed to meet friends or, if I’m hungry, to get a bite to eat,” Aozaki tells us. The NY-based artist isn’t necessarily trying to complete the map. What’s more important is that the artistic process reflects his daily life; almost like a diary.
maps  mapping  art  nobutakaaozaki  2013  nyc  manhattan  directions  handdrawnmaps  wayfinding  ncmideas  via:tealtan 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Campsick: Julian Bleecker Reports from Alec Soth’s Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers — Magazine — Walker Art Center
"To give a measure of what a Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers is, let me describe some of its awkward moments.

1. Unspecified expectations, except whatever happens, it will be shared at a public slideshow on the last day.

2. No packing list. Usually, when I went to summer camp as a young tot, there were checklists of bug spray, 12 changes of underwear, swim trunks, swim goggles, toiletries, sleeping bag, wash cloth, pajamas, sun hat, etc.

3. No agenda, except to show up on July 9 at the offices of Little Brown Mushroom around 9:30 or 10.

4. Suburban excursion in a stout RV. That just sorta happened. Spontaneously.

5. Itchy, scratchy mosquito bites in spite of semi-legal, high-test, under-the-counter mosquito repellent.

6. Late-night slideshows. (Think of it as a modern variant of the campfire story telling hour.)

7. A surprise birthday cake.

8. A dance.

9. Campsick. It’s like homesick, but for camp. Specifically, an aching in the belly, like you’ve finished a great summer at camp and must immediately make plans to stay in touch and meet again. As soon as possible. Like something happened you didn’t want to stop, but you had to because it was too expensive to change flights and stay another day or two.

That was the Little Brown Mushroom Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers, a project that brought together 15 eager campers from all over the map. Camp, as Soth described it to me, “evokes campfires and canoes, but the definition is actually quite flexible. ‘Camp’ simply means a summertime gathering that lacks the formal and institutionalized aura of school.” For Soth, the hope was “to just create a context in which people can make art happen.”

But that context, as camp’s name suggests, is decidedly awkward. That’s fitting for a group like Little Brown Mushroom. There is not the pretension that one might expect from a studio attached to an artist’s name. It would’ve been clear to anyone who knew of LBM—either through its blog, their books, or Soth’s work—that camp would not be supplicating students learning from the great master. First of all, Soth is self-admittedly awkward in front of people, so he would not be holding forth in the style of the self-indulgent artist. We’d be working among each other, campers and counselors on equal footing. It was activity-time camp, nearly 14 hours every day. We’d be defining the activities. Exuberant, exhausting, difficult, strange, get-your-game-face-on kinds of activities."



"I have no idea what’s going on, or what I’m doing, but I’m doing it.

And now, back at our encampment there are four of us quietly sitting, thinking, drawing, talking. Out of nowhere, Jim’s lying on the ground in front of the limb-and-leaf backdrop. He’s perfectly still. Is it overdone performance, or is he my muse for the day? I decide, game-face on, he’ll be my muse. Most people have left to find stories in the neighborhood surrounding the park. Some have driven to other parts of town.

The hard part is finding a story in that. You have to, though. Day Two slideshow is at 7 pm. That’s just a couple hours from now.

This is the day that I realize I need to be inspired by the constraints that exist at camp. There are constraints of time, obviously. Cooking out a slideshow from a day of conversations, excursions, light reading, trundling in RVs, following fellow campers in the woods. All this means I have to hold my ideas lightly, not make things too precious, keeping my nose up for any whiff of a story to find and tell.

Today, I’ve become sensitized to what Soth refers to as “humble epics.” Big, powerful things, perhaps in modest, carefully constructed, simple, compact, $18 or cheaper packages.

That’s a kind of storytelling that feels quite modern in a sense. The overwrought image and text story is not what will come out of camp. There are no Taschen-sized epics to be done here, at least for me. I find that liberating. As I quickly refine and hone and edit my forest slideshow, I consider LBM’s obsession with audaciously democratizing the pricing of their publications at $18. I think about Target, the Twin Cities mega-mega that I can imagine goes to nutso ends to whittle pricing by fractions of pennies to make them the no-brainer store. Soth mentions an LBM book that they couldn’t get cheaper than $24, and you can physically see the disappointment at the price-point in his shoulders. Soth would make a great Target buyer. You know, in case this whole photography thing doesn’t work out.

The inexpensive, accessible, humble, epic, image+text LBM books come with an inherent simplicity in production, packaging, and design that is an aesthetic in its own right. Accessible, humble epics are a thing of note, especially within the world that Soth could circulate. He’s a Minnesotan first, Magnum photographer second. Beautiful, seductive, tangible $18 stories-in-books are not a gimmick. Free camp isn’t a gimmick. I can see the earnestness in his explanation of the non-tuition camp. He wants it open. He doesn’t want to turn away someone who could not afford to attend because of a fee. He doesn’t want LBM to be big business.

And only now do I realize that we’re learning how to tell stories. I’ve never mentioned it and stifled the thought in my own head, but we’ve not had formal discussions about photography. At the end of Day Two, during the slideshow, I resolve the suspicion I’ve had since shortly before I arrived: this is not a photography camp, despite being in a photography studio. That thought relaxes me. No one’s geeking out on gear. There is scant feedback on technical elements of image-making or storytelling. We’re free to find stories. Of course, that’s liberating and debilitating at the same time. We’re not told what to do. We’re only told that “whatever you do, whatever story you want to tell at the public slideshow on Saturday, it mustn’t take more than five minutes to tell.”

Day Three
Bookmaking Day, although we don’t make books. We talk about books and their making and unmaking. Some campers wonder why we’re doing a slideshow rather than a book as a final deliverable. A book is easier to keep and share and show again and again. We have a nice, long discussion in the morning facilitated by Alec and designer and art director Hans Seeger. We talk about the materiality and tangibility of books. Their preciousness. The contrast in books designed too earnestly, and books devoid of design that are merely containers for famous photographs by famous photographers. We talked about the great glissade of books after 1986 when computers performed their radical democratization of visual design and publishing. And I wondered how short-form composition and networked dissemination frameworks like Twitter, Instagram, and Vine would do similar things. I wonder aloud to camp if the modern image+text story as we know it now—the things in Soth’s studio library—are for doddering “old” folks like us? I want to talk about the modern, modern image+text story? Is Adam Goldberg’s Vine feed tomorrow’s Willliam Eggleston, or perhaps Cindy Sherman? The comparison may sound idiotic. I once thought that instantly sharing one’s thoughts in 140 characters was idiotic and self-indulgent. I once thought #selfies were idiotic. Then the Arab Spring happened, facilitated in part by 140 characters and what protesters could share in a single image.

The bookmaking-day discussions turn into a list of books to get and a note to consider getting another bookshelf at home. That’s fine. Having a library of books—the material sort—is validated by LBM’s amazing collection. It’s the morning-quiet-time gathering place we all meander through as our coffee takes hold. There’s a quiet reverence to the library in the mornings as campers peruse the stacks, heads cocked to the side to read titles. I find my first photo book in the B’s [Hello, Skater Girl, 2012] and feel suddenly embarrassed at its earnest naivete. I wish I had been to camp and learned what I am learning at camp before I made that.

LBM is a publisher of stories, so one might think camp would do a book as a final outcome. But that brings along complexity and time and money, and you begin to obsess over the operational details of producing such a thing. The slideshow. It has a tradition. It’s familial. It’s familiar. It’s something that can be condensed into a short amount of time. It has history."



"I think about “bookmaking” day’s discussion of Darin Mickey’s Stuff I Gotta Remember Not To Forget and his image story about his father’s odd, Cohen-esque life as a salesman of storage space in underground vaults. In 27 images, Mickey tells a remarkable, humorous, heartfelt story about his father. And I think of Soth’s image of a strikingly pale Indonesian girl he stumbles upon, photographs for The Auckland Project, loses the photograph and then spends the rest of his time struggling to find a story, struggling to find an image that moves him. He finds “missing cat” posters, bird road kill, and pale models. Just hours before he leaves Auckland, he stumbles upon Diandra, the pale Indonesian girl, sitting delicately on a low wall, watching the tiniest bird.

These count as powerful stories in my mind and from what I’ve been learning at camp. I’m thinking about “humble epics,” creative constraints. And how to get done in the next four hours."
julianbleecker  campforsociallyawkwardstorytellers  alecsoth  openstudioproject  camp  lcproject  classideas  walkerartcenter  minnesota  adventure  fun  conferences  unconferences  experientialeducation  design  bookslcproject  summerinwintercamp  littlebrownmushroom  ncmideas  conferenceideas  2013  camps  learning  collaboration  projectideas  experientiallearning 
august 2013 by robertogreco
1 | This Fun Tool Teaches Kids To Program With Pictures | Co.Design: business + innovation + design
"What’s brilliant about Isla is that its toylike simplicity--natural language, simple shapes, clear instructions, instant feedback--co-exists with a spartan respect for the realities of grown-up coding. Like the fact that, with all due respect to Scratch and Kodu, most programming still happens in plain text. The box where you type instructions into Isla looks just like a command line, and acts like an IDE (integrated development environment): If you get some syntax wrong, it’ll reject your code with an error message. The difference is that the error messages are in plain english, and gently invite you to think about what you need to change in order to get it right."

[Isla: http://islalanguage.org/ ]
isla  coding  programming  children  johnpavlus  2013  ncmideas  teaching 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Public Assembly
"Public Assembly is a nomadic platform for collective works of art. Founded by Lawrence Lek in 2011, we champion the creation of events, experiments and environments driven by interdisciplinary participation. This approach enables us to challenge existing power structures in contemporary culture, creating social situations where critical forms of knowledge and creative practice can emerge."
art  nomads  nomadism  collective  lawrencelek  events  interdisciplinary  participation  participatory  ncmideas  openstudioproject  pop-ups  culture  society  creativepractice  london 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Art and Inquiry: Museum Teaching Strategies For Your Classroom | Coursera
"Explore how to integrate works of art into your classroom with inquiry-based teaching methods originally developed for in-gallery museum education."
lisamazzola  ncmideas  museums  teaching  education  art  inquiry-basedlearning  moma  coursera  artinquiry 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Art Teaching for a New Age - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education
[NB: Tagging this one Black Mountain College and BMC, not because it is references in the text, but that it reminds me of BMC.]

[Also related, in my mind: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/15046238819/our-middle-school-is-an-art-school and http://www.graphpaper.com/2007/10-17_what-i-learned-in-art-school-is-it-design-thinking ]

"The technological changes we are witnessing will not threaten conceptual rigor or craft, nor will the ease of expression and communication make art obsolete. But these shifts are changing what we mean by art making and what counts as meaningful, crafted expression. To say so is not to judge the quality of that expression or to lament the rise of vulgarity or the lowering of standards. It is simply to observe that this democratization of expression will alter fundamentally how students—aspiring artists—think about art, its meaning and purpose, and the ways in which it is made.

These shifts will also change the professions for which educational institutions like mine prepare students. After all, if technology becomes smart enough to make design decisions, then designers could increasingly become technicians, operators of machines instead of creative professionals. But the more profound—and less visible—impact will be on how students think about their creative pursuits.

We cannot say with certainty what that impact will be. The first generation of so-called digital natives is reaching college only now; the environment they grew up in—which seemed so radical and new to many of us just a decade and a half ago—is already a punchline. Soon it will be an antiquated joke that doesn't even make sense anymore. Remember AOL? Remember plugging in to access the Net? Today's students don't.

They arrive at college having shot and edited video, manipulated photographs, recorded music—or at least sampled and remixed someone else's—designed or assembled animated characters and even virtual environments, and "painted" digital images—all using technologies readily available at home or even in their pocket. The next generation of students will have designed and printed three-dimensional images, customized consumer products, perhaps "rapid-prototyped" new products—I can't imagine what else.

Students today are not simply bombarded by images, consuming them in great gulps, as previous generations did; they are making the environments they inhabit, and making meaningful connections among images, stories, mythologies, and value systems. They are creative and creating.

But their notion of what it means to create is different from ours. It's something one does to communicate with others, to participate in social networks, to entertain oneself. Making things—images, objects, stories—is mundane for these students, not sacred. It's a component of everyday experience, woven tightly into the fabric of daily life.

So what is the task of arts educators? Is it to disabuse these young people of what we think are their misconceptions? Is it to inculcate in them an understanding of the "proper" way to create, to make art or entertainment? Is it to sort out the truly artistic from the great mass of creative chatterers—and to initiate them into some sacred tradition?

Maybe. Maybe not.

Or maybe the task of the educator is to help them develop judgment, to help them to see that creating, which they do instinctively, almost unconsciously, is a way of learning, of knowing, of making arguments and observations, of affecting and transforming their environment. And perhaps that's not so very different from what we do now.

We do it now, though, in the context of a curriculum and institutional histories oriented toward specific professional training and preparation. We seek to develop in students the critical faculties needed to thrive in clearly defined professions. But in the future, we may have to rethink our purpose and objectives. We may have to reimagine our curricula, recast the bachelor-of-fine-arts degree as a generalist—not professional—degree.

In a media-saturated culture in which everyone is both maker and consumer of images, products, sounds, and immersive experiences like games, and in which professional opportunities are more likely to be invented or discovered than pursued, maybe the B.F.A. is the most appropriate general-education experience, not just for aspiring artists and designers but for everyone.

That poses challenges for arts educators. We are good at equipping students who are already interested in careers in art and design with the skills and judgment necessary to succeed in artistic fields and creative professions that are still reasonably well defined. We are less good at educating them broadly, at equipping them to use their visual acuity, design sensibility, and experience as makers to solve the problems—alone or in collaboration with others—that the next generation of creative professionals may be called on to solve. These will be complex problems that cross the boundaries of traditional disciplines, methodologies, and skill sets—ranging from new fields like data visualization, which draws on graphic design, statistical analysis, and interaction design, to traditional challenges like brand development, which increasingly reaches beyond logos on letterhead to products and environments.

To do that, arts colleges would have to reorganize their curricula and their pedagogy. Teaching might come to look a lot more like what we now call mentorship or advising. Rather than assume that young people know what they want to do and that we know how to prepare them to do it, we would have to help them to explore their interests and aspirations and work with them to create an educational experience that meets their needs.

Curricula would not be configured as linear, progressive pathways of traditional semester-long courses, but would consist of components, such as short workshops, online courses, intensive tutorials, and so forth. Students would pick and choose among components, arranging and rearranging them according to what they need at a particular moment. Have a problem that requires that you use a particular software program? Go learn it, to solve that problem or complete that project. Want to pursue a traditional illustration-training program? Take multiple drawing and painting studios.

Linking all of this together would not be a traditional liberal-arts curriculum but what one faculty member at the University of the Arts has called a liberal art curriculum—one focused on design as problem solving, on artistic expression as the articulation and interrogation of ideas. Instead of an arts-and-sciences core curriculum separate and disconnected from studio instruction, we would build a new core that integrates the studio and the seminar room, that envisions making and thinking not as distinct approaches but as a dynamic conversation.

This fantasy of an alternative arts education—which resembles experiments that other educators have attempted in the past—begins to veer into utopianism, though, and a vague utopianism at that. It would be impossible to administer and to offer to students cost-effectively. And most students would probably find it more perplexing than liberating.

But I see an urgent need for new models that respond to the changing conditions affecting higher education—models that can adapt to conditions that are in constant flux and to an emerging sensibility among young people that is more entrepreneurial, flexible, and alert to change than our curricula are designed to accommodate.

We need an educational structure that takes instability and unpredictability as its starting point, its fundamental assumption. If a university is not made up of stable, enduring structures arranged linearly or hierarchically—schools, departments, majors, minors—but rather is made up of components that can be used or deployed according to demand and need, then invention instead of convention becomes the governing institutional dynamic."
arteducation  art  education  expression  artisticexpression  internet  web  making  unpredictability  uncertainty  liberalarts  generalists  specialists  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  multimedia  lcproject  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  ncmideas  openstudioproject  2013  seanbuffington  teaching  learning  criticalthinking  problemsolving  communication  bfa  mfa  highered  highereducation  generaleducation  curriculum  altgdp  design  craft  internetage  medialiteracy  media  newmedia  rapidprototyping  projectbasedlearning  bmc  blackmountaincollege  pbl 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Cybernetics on the Prairie | Complex Fields
"The core of this project takes the form of BCL/IGB, a commissioned public artwork in three parts: a printed mural, a reprinted collection of historic texts, and a recreated historical computer. I intended the work as a monument to an under-recognized episode in my home institution’s history, constructed in a form appropriate to the content.

More ambitiously, this work is an attempt to deal with the nature of institutional memory, especially in the context of scientific research. More personally, I entered the project as a way to learn how one might successfully navigate the complex moral and philosophical challenges of teaching, research and administration in a modern American University."

[Related: http://bcl.ece.illinois.edu/
http://bcl.ece.illinois.edu/hutchinson/
http://complexfields.org/here/158
http://diabeticfootonline.blogspot.com/2013/07/of-phantom-limbs-and-foreign-bodies.html

[The Whole University Catalog http://spinelessbooks.com/wholeuniversity/ and in .pdf: http://spinelessbooks.com/wholeuniversity/catalog.pdf ]
biologicalcomputerlab  instituteforgenomicbiology  kevinhamilton  sybernetics  complexfields  ncmideas  projectideas  zines  education  history  teaching  biology  research  wholeuniversitycatalog  humbertomaturana  herbertbrün  counterculture  1960s  1969  univeristyofillinois  deschooling  unschooling  pedagogy  radicalpedagogy 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Hive NYC Learning Network
[From the about page, which also includes a great directory of organizations.]

"Hive NYC Learning Network is a Mozilla project that was founded through The MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning initiative to fuel collaborations between cultural organizations to create new learning pathways and innovative education practices together. Hive NYC is composed of fifty-six non-profit organizations—museums, libraries, after-school clubs and informal learning spaces—that create Connected Learning opportunities for youth. Network members have access to funding to support this work through The Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust.

Core Beliefs:
• School is not the sole provider in a community’s educational system
• Youth need to be both sophisticated consumers and active producers of digital media
• Learning should be driven by youth’s interests
• Digital media and technology are the glue and amplifier for connected learning experiences
• Out-of-school time spaces are fertile grounds for learning innovation
• Organizations must collaborate to thrive

Hive NYC operates as a city-based learning lab, where members network with each other, share best practices and pedagogies, learn about and play with new technologies, participate in events, and most importantly, collaborate to create learning opportunities for NYC youth. As part of the network, members have access to the following support and services:

• Strategic guidance in seeking funding through the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in the New York Community Trust
• Brokered connections between member organizations based on shared ideas and potential programs
• Participation in events in and beyond New York City that illustrate the work of network members and promote Connected Learning principles, digital literacy AND webmaking skills
• Access to involvement with the NYC Department of Education and others seeking to build experimental and/or sustainable partnerships with Hive NYC
• Opportunity to promote new, programs and events through Hive NYC communications channels (blog, Facebook, Twitter, etc.), as well as youth and volunteer recruitment
• A knowledge exchange for members to share models, ideas, content, tools and best-practices with each other
• Professional Development sessions that develop staff through network peer mentoring, modeling and sharing
• Monthly, in-person meet-ups and conference calls that allow for members to share program updates, best practices, and learn about new opportunities
• Additional seed funding for technology development, research, etc.

Each year, more than 6,000 tweens and teens across NYC directly engage with Hive NYC. These youth take part in projects funded by the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust, private and community events, and programs resulting from network partnerships. Another 330,000 youth are indirectly impacted by these efforts, and through the broad dissemination of innovations and programs developed within the network."

[See also: http://hiveresearchlab.org/ ]
nyc  hivenyclearning  mozilla  informallearning  self-directed  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  learning  youth  openstudioproject  lcproject  macarthurfoundation  homago  museums  ncmideas  afterschool  clubs  learningspaces  funding  professionaldevelopment  bestpractices  digitalliteracy  networkedlearning  networks  collaboration  digitalmedia  newmedia  technology  interestdriven  amnh  bankstreetcollege  beamcenter  brooklynmuseum  brooklynpubliclibrary  carnegiehall  centerforurbanpedagogy  citylore  children'smuseumofthearts  coderjojo  dreamyard  exposurecamp  eyebeam  facinghistoryandourselves  glovbalkids  grilswritenow  maketheroad  thelamp  nycsalt  parsons  reelworks  wagnercollege  worldup  wnyc  wnycradiorookies  urbanword  toked  thepoint  rubinmuseum  momi  nypl  moma  iridescentlearning  habitatmap  cooper-hewitt  commonsensemedia  brooklyn  bronx  manhattan  groundswell  mouse  downtowncommunitytelevision  globalactionproject  globalkids  instituteofplay  joanganzcooneycenter  people'sproductionhouse  radiorookies  stoked  queens  statenisland 
july 2013 by robertogreco
DIRTI for iPad, World's first tapioca interface | USER STUDIO
"a 570cm3 dish that contains about 8.600 seeds of dry tapioca grains

Our research led us to wonder if and how we could change the relationship that humans have with tangible controllers: at the time (2011) we were working on trying to control thousands of particles on the screen in the most natural, intuitive fashion possible. We figured there was no better way than by actually controlling real world particles! So when creating this new "DIRTInterface", we set our minds on making something a little less accurate, while a lot more subtle, constantly adapting, almost alive. Tackling the cold, abrupt interaction that traditional controllers impose on us... It was all about interaction design politics ;)

Ok, so what's DIRTI in the first place?

It's the World's first tapioca interface! No really, it enables you to control your computer or your iPad with tapioca or anything else that's semi-transparent and that you can mold, like vanilla ice cream for example. Any non-opaque material that's either granular or liquid will do just fine. It's kind of a real-world interface. And the acronym stands for Dirty Tangible Interface. Tacky? Yeaaaah, we love tacky!

You, the user, interact with your machine by moving the material around in a sand-blasted dish. Anything that you're going to produce from within the Dirty Tangible Interface can not be 100% accurate, but it's infinitely refined, expressive and subtle. And you can't cancel any action or go back to a previous, default position, but you can control any graphics or sounds coming out of your machine with amazing expressivity, just like with real world instruments. Say, a violin. Not even kidding. And who wouldn't like plunging their hands in ice cream?!"
dirti  interface  tactile  touch  ncmideas  particles  texture  software  programming  installation  tangiblecontrollers  controllers  input  via:markllobrera  userstudio  glvo  maisondepetits  centquatre  rolandcahen  diemoschwarz  ircam  raspeberrypi  ios  ipad  destronics  topophonie 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Public Engagement Artist in Residence Machine Project + Hammer Museum [.pdf]
"When the Hammer Museum embarked upon its Public Engagement program, thanks to a generous grant from the Irvine Foundation, we were afforded the opportunity to consider the roles of art, of artists, and even of visitors from a fresh perspective. It was a unique chance to put aside long-held notions of what guests often expect a museum experience to be—static and monologic at worst—and to enact what it can be at best—dynamic, with visitor and institution in conversation. Through Public Engagement, visitors have been able to step outside of their traditional roles as observers and to become participants. Similarly, we have been able to open up our process for working with artists and to collaborate on creating a new sphere, one that often exists beyond standard exhibitions and performances. Public Engagement has been one of our greatest experiments to date at the Hammer, coming at a pivotal moment in the history of the institution."
publicengagement  markallen  machineproject  ncmideas  openstudioproject  hammermuseum  art  experience  via:ablerism  museums  participation 
july 2013 by robertogreco
The LBM Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers « Little Brown Mushroom
[via: http://www.flickr.com/photos/julianbleecker/sets/72157634559501046/ ]

"Established in 2008 by Alec Soth, Little Brown Mushroom (LBM) is committed to exploring the narrative potential of the photo book. Having worked closely with photographers, writers and designers, we’re now eager to exchange ideas with students and emerging artists.

Visual storytelling tends to be a lonely business. As such, it attracts more than its share of wallflowers. Here at LBM (home to more than a couple introverts), we thought it would be worthwhile to bring creative loners together to see what we can learn from each other. We’re envisioning a gathering that is more summer camp than classroom. After various daytime outings, we’ll sit around the digital projector and tell each other stories. From there we’ll discuss the ways in which visual stories can be translated into book form.

When: July 9-13, 2013

Where: After gathering each morning at the Little Brown Mushroom headquarters in St. Paul, we’ll have regular outings around the Twin Cities. Participants should have their own transportation. Housing is not provided.

Who: The gathering will be led by LBM team: Alec Soth, Carrie Thompson, Galen Fletcher, Ethan Jones, Brad Zellar and Jason Polan. We are inviting photographers, writers, illustrators, designers or anyone interested in visual storytelling to apply. While social awkwardness isn’t mandatory, it is encouraged.

Cost: Free

How to apply: 

Create a single PDF (no bigger than 5mb) with the following:

• Your name and contact information
• A concise and informal biography (age, where do you live, what do you do, etc). We’d also love to see a picture of you.
• Examples of your work (this can be photography, writing, illustration, graphic design or anything else you can get into a PDF).
• A link to your website or other work you have online
• Important: we can not accept PDF files larger than 5mb

Email the PDF to camp@littlebrownmushroom.com

Deadline: April 15th. We will notify applicants about our selection by April 30th.

view this info as a printable PDF"

----

"Established in 2008 by Alec Soth, Little Brown Mushroom (LBM) is a small publishing house located in St. Paul, Minnesota. Working closely with photographers, writers and designers, LBM is committed to experimenting with new ways of creating and distributing visual stories."
littlebrownmushroom  classideas  photobooks  ncmideas  openstudioproject  alecsoth  carriethompson  galenfletcher  ethanjones  bradzellar  jasonpollan  storytelling  projectideas  minnesota  stpaul  photography  publishing  selfpublishing  lcproject  summerinwintercamp  campforsociallyawkwardstorytellers  self-publishing 
july 2013 by robertogreco
A+ Unlimited Potential - Museum District | Houston A+ Challenge
"A+UP is a tuition-free, open application middle school scheduled to open in Houston’s Museum District in Fall 2013. We are now accepting applications to join our first class of 40 sixth graders. We will add a new class of sixth graders each year, and by 2015 our school will serve students in grades 6-8.

A+UP offers families a unique alternative to traditional school models. Our teachers are known as Learning Coaches, because they design technology-rich curriculum to fit each student’s unique needs. The school itself serves as a safe, supportive place for young adults to access the many high-quality academic resources now available online.

Classes are held ON-SITE at a broad range of Houston’s finest learning institutions, including:

• The Health Museum
• The Museum of Natural Science
• The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
• The Houston Zoo
• The Children's Museum, and
• The Holocaust Museum Houston.

This “mobile” setting allows students to utilize these collections and resources for in-depth, hands-on learning projects, while reinforcing the school’s core principle: that 21st century learning transcends time and space."

[via: http://www.yourhoustonnews.com/memorial/data/new-middle-school-set-to-open-in-museum-district-this/article_7c1fe151-04b9-543d-adc5-ad7036b3b8b5.html ]

[See also: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/A-mobile-middle-school-for-Museum-District-4590318.php ]
cityasclassroom  museums  schools  a+up  houston  texas  education  mobileclassroom  mobile  nomadicclassroom  2013  tcsnmy  ncmideas  teaching  learning  openstudioproject  lcproject  cicelybenoit  jennifermascheck  scottvanbeck  paulcastro 
july 2013 by robertogreco

related tags

1960s  1969  2010  2012  2013  a+up  accessibility  activism  adventure  affection  afterschool  alecsoth  alethiawittman  altgdp  amnh  animals  architecture  ardinagreco  art  art21  artclubbing  arteducation  artifacts  artinquiry  artisticexpression  artists  arts  artstudioasahigaoka  astrataylor  astronomy  attendance  audience  audiences  audio  ball-nogues  bankstreetcollege  beamcenter  bestpractices  bfa  bhqfu  biohacking  biologicalcomputerlab  biologigarden  biology  biotech  biotechnology  blackmountaincollege  blogs  bmc  bodies  body  books  bookslcproject  bradzellar  brasil  brazil  briandillon  bronx  brooklyn  brooklynmuseum  brooklynpubliclibrary  cabinetofcuriosities  camp  campforsociallyawkwardstorytellers  camps  cardboard  carnegiehall  carriethompson  centerforurbanpedagogy  centquatre  change  children'smuseumofthearts  children  childrensmuseums  cicelybenoit  cities  citizenscience  cityasclassroom  citylore  classideas  cliques  clubs  coderjojo  coding  collaboration  collections  collective  color  commonsensemedia  communication  community  complexfields  conferenceideas  conferences  consensus  contemporary  contemporaryart  control  controllers  cooper-hewitt  cooperation  costumes  counterculture  coursera  craft  creativepractice  crisscorza  criticalthinking  criticism  crossdisciplinary  crowds  culture  culturejamming  curriculum  dada  dance  davidchipperfield  decay  defamiliarization  democracy  democraticeducation  deschooling  design  destronics  diemoschwarz  digitalliteracy  digitalmedia  directions  dirti  diy  downtowncommunitytelevision  dreamyard  eating  economics  education  engagement  ericascourti  ethanjones  ethnography  events  exhibitions  experience  experientialeducation  experientiallearning  exposurecamp  expression  eyebeam  fabric  facinghistoryandourselves  families  fantasy  felixgonzalez-torres  fionaromeo  firstworkset  flashmobs  florida  food  franzerhardwalther  free  fun  funding  furniture  galenfletcher  games  gaming  gastonnogues  generaleducation  generalists  globalactionproject  globalkids  glovbalkids  glvo  grilswritenow  groundswell  gruponeoconcreto  habitatmap  hackerspaces  hacking  hackteria  hammermuseum  handdrawnmaps  hauntedhouse  heeliooiticica  herbertbrün  hierarchy  highered  highereducation  history  hivenyclearning  homago  houston  howwelearn  howweteach  humanbody  humans  humbertomaturana  ideology  incluseum  inclusion  inclusivity  informallearning  inlcusivity  input  inquiry-basedlearning  inquiry  installation  installations  instituteforgenomicbiology  instituteofplay  interactive  interboropartners  interdisciplinary  interestdriven  interface  internet  internetage  ios  ipad  ircam  iridescentlearning  isla  japan  jasonpollan  jennifermascheck  joanganzcooneycenter  jodidean  johnbaldessari  johncage  johnhawke  johnpavlus  josephbeuys  julianbleecker  kent  kevinhamilton  kids  landscapes  lawrencelek  lcproject  learning  learningspaces  liberalarts  lisabrahms  lisamazzola  littlebrownmushroom  locative  london  losangeles  lygiaclark  macarthurfoundation  machineproject  maisondepetits  makerspaces  maketheroad  making  manhattan  mapping  maps  marianepomuceno  markallen  media  medialiteracy  mediation  medicalmuseion  memory  mfa  minnesota  mobile  mobileclassroom  moma  momi  mouse  mozilla  mp3  multidisciplinary  multimedia  museum2.0  museums  music  namjunepaik  narrative  naturalhistory  ncm  nejaminball  networkedcapital  networkedlearning  networks  newmedia  ninasimon  nobutakaaozaki  nomadicclassroom  nomadism  nomads  notanalternative  nyc  nycsalt  nypl  objects  objectstories  observation  online  openstudioproject  paolaantonelli  paranolés  parsons  participation  participatory  participatoryart  particles  paulcastro  pbl  pedagogy  people'sproductionhouse  performance  pervasive  photobooks  photography  pingmag  pinterest  planetariums  play  policy  politics  pop-ups  postmodernism  power  problemsolving  professionaldevelopment  programming  projectbasedlearning  projectideas  ps1  publicengagement  publishing  queens  quiet  radicalpedagogy  radiorookies  rapidprototyping  raspeberrypi  recycling  reelworks  reflection  research  robertrauschenberg  robertstorr  rolandcahen  rosepaquetkinsley  rubinmuseum  scenes  schools  science  sciencefiction  scifi  scottvanbeck  sculpture  seanbuffington  seattle  self-directed  self-directedlearning  self-publishing  selfpublishing  slow  social  socialinclusion  socialmedia  socialpracticeart  society  software  sound  space  specialists  spoons  statenisland  stoked  storytelling  stpaul  strangeness  summerinwintercamp  sybernetics  tactile  tangiblecontrollers  taste  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  teaching  technology  texas  text  textiles  texture  thelamp  theory  thepoint  thinking  toked  tokyo  topophonie  torafuarchitects  touch  tropicália  turnercontemporary  uk  uncertainty  unconferences  unfamiliar  univeristyofillinois  unpredictability  unschooling  urban  urbanism  urbanword  userstudio  utensils  video  vitoacconci  wagnercollege  walkerartcenter  washingtonstate  wayfinding  wearable  wearables  web  wholeuniversitycatalog  wnyc  wnycradiorookies  wonder  worldup  wunderkammer  yaa  yokoono  younatart  youth  zines  zizek 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: