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Everybody (Still) Hates Dwight
"Part of the reason fans almost universally dislike Dwight Howard is that it seems like every NBA player who has ever met Dwight Howard dislikes Dwight Howard."
a:Rodger-Sherman★  p:The-Ringer★★  d:2018.07.25  w:1500  NBA 
16 days ago by bankbryan
The Mystery of Max Money
"Removing salary limits is an appealing idea, and it would probably inject a bit more balance into the league. Players would have to make a real choice based on wildly divergent salary amounts, roster strength, and other variables. Capping max salaries today works to (almost) equalize what everyone can offer, and that allows players to choose teams based on other variables: market size, the appeal of a team’s city, tax laws, and the presence of another superstar. A certain subset of teams will always lose out in that choice. But uncapping individual salaries is a complicated concept with ripple effects and unintended consequences, and it touches on every other part of the NBA system. You can’t move one branch of the tree — the player salary structure — without anticipating how it will shift every other branch."
a:Zach-Lowe★★  p:Grantland★★  d:2014.06.17  w:3000  NBA  incentives  from instapaper
17 days ago by bankbryan
The NBA supermax and the price of loyalty
"This introduces moral hazard. It is a get-out-of-jail-free card. If teams make suboptimal decisions, even with 28- and 29-year-old players, they should pay for them, several executives told me. It was not hard to envision that a supermax for Wall could cripple the Wizards in 2022. (To be clear: Wall is really good -- I've voted him to multiple All-NBA teams over the years -- and his deal is fine for now, recent photographic evidence notwithstanding.) If that comes to pass, the Wizards should have to live with it, the thinking goes."
a:Zach-Lowe★★  p:ESPN★★  d:2018.07.27  w:3000  NBA  incentives  from instapaper
17 days ago by bankbryan
Eliminating the Limit – Cleaning the Glass
We can see this by looking at all of the top 10 picks in the high school era and comparing those players who came straight out of high school to those who played Division 1. Their average games played and average total minutes played were roughly equivalent. But the high schoolers had much higher upside. Of the 14 high schoolers taken in the top 10, half became All-Stars and they averaged 3.7 All-Star appearances per player. For D1 players taken in the top 10 those numbers were 34% and 1.7. In fact, five of the high school players taken in the top 10 had more than five All-Star appearances in their career — they make up some of the best players of the era: Kevin Garnett, LeBron James, Tracy McGrady, Dwight Howard, and Amar’e Stoudemire.

The gap between the high schoolers and D1 players gets even wider the further down the draft we go. 80% of the high schoolers drafted in picks 11-30 played at least 10,000 career NBA minutes, while just 43% of the D1 players did. The high schoolers produced an average of 37 wins over their careers, as measured by Basketball-Reference.com’s Win Shares metric, while the D1 players produced an average of 19.
CTG  NBA 
19 days ago by abemaingi
Kawhi Leonard, Joel Embiid among NBA's best sneaker free agents
"Industry sources say most brands aren't worried about his return from the right quad injury that saw him appear in only nine games this past season, and expect him to return to form on the court. There is, however, cause for concern about his prior lack of interest in endorsement deals and commercials, and his reluctance to play in flashy sneakers that can help draw attention to a brand's new launches.Jordan featured Leonard in its Gatorade-affiliated "Like Mike" campaign at the start of last season to little fanfare -- he's likely best known in the marketing world for his deadpan expressions in local San Antonio grocery store ads."
a:Nick-DePaula  p:ESPN★★  d:2018.07.24  w:2500  NBA  marketing  from instapaper
21 days ago by bankbryan

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