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Cassini: The Grand Finale: The Saturn System Through the Eyes of Cassini (e-Book)
This free NASA e-Book celebrates Saturn as seen through the eyes of the Cassini spacecraft. 

The Cassini-Huygens mission has revolutionized our knowledge of the Saturn system and revealed surprising places in the solar system where life could potentially gain a foothold—bodies we call ocean worlds.
Cassini  NASA  science  space 
2 days ago by Weaverbird
Cassini: The Grand Finale: Three Times the Fun
Three of Saturn's moons -- Tethys, Enceladus, and Mimas -- are captured in this group photo from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
Cassini  NASA  science  space 
2 days ago by Weaverbird
Cassini Is Gone. Here Are the Next Space Missions to Watch Out For
Now that Cassini has gone out in a blaze of glory, you’re probably wondering what cosmic missions you can get excited about next. Though NASA is reviewing proposals that may include a return to Saturn to seek signs of life on ocean worlds like its moons Enceladus and Titan, other endeavors into deep space are already on the calendar. Here are a variety of space missions worth keeping tabs on over the next decade or so.
Cassini  NASA  science  space 
2 days ago by Weaverbird
Cassini: The dying of the light | The Planetary Society
It was transmitting data all the way down. According to project manager Earl Maize, they are pretty sure the last data packet was from the magnetometer instrument. I talked with magnetometer team leader Michelle Dougherty about these last bits of data. She said it will be three to six months before they are able to report any results, but she’s hopeful they’ll finally be able to find an angular separation between the spin axis and the magnetic pole. She said that the data they have already tells them that angle is less than 0.06 degrees; with the final-plunge data, they’ll be able to find a separation as small as 0.015 degrees.
Cassini  NASA  science  space 
2 days ago by Weaverbird
Bad Astronomy | Good night, Saturn
From now on, when I stand in my yard, or in some other state, or anywhere on this blue-green world, and my own gaze falls upon that yellow unblinking light in the sky, I know a smile will slip onto my lips. Because I know Saturn better now than I ever have, and that the same is true for so many others like me, like you, like everyone who chooses to wonder, everywhere on Earth.

And for that, for that, I thank you. Farewell, Cassini. You’ve made two worlds better places to be.
Cassini  NASA  science  space 
2 days ago by Weaverbird

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