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Wolfram Challenges: Programming Puzzles for the Wolfram Language
"An expanding collection of Challenges for both beginners and experienced programmers. Find a track that fits your interests in coding, math, word puzzles, computational thinking and more…"
wolfram  mathematica  programming 
9 days ago by gavin
The Scientific Paper Is Obsolete. Here's What's Next. - The Atlantic
At every turn, IPython chose the way that was more inclusive, to the point where it’s no longer called “IPython”: The project rebranded itself as “Jupyter” in 2014 to recognize the fact that it was no longer just for Python. The Jupyter notebook, as it’s called, is like a Mathematica notebook but for any programming language. You can have a Python notebook, or a C notebook, or an R notebook, or Ruby, or Javascript, or Julia. Anyone can build support for their programming language in Jupyter. Today it supports more than 100 languages.

Theodore Gray, who developed the original Mathematica notebook interface, said that he once as an experiment tried to build support for other programming languages into it. “It never went anywhere,” he told me. “The company had no interest in supporting this. And also because when you have to support a lot of different languages, you can’t do it as deeply.”
mathematica  jupyper  python  science  research 
12 days ago by euler
The Scientific Paper Is Obsolete. Here's What's Next. - The Atlantic
“Elsevier hired me to do some consulting thing about ‘What would the future of scientific publishing look like?’” This was before the Mathematica notebook, but he gave them a spiel along the same lines. “A few years ago I was talking to some of their upper management again. I realized in this meeting, oh my gosh, I said exactly the same things 35 years ago!”
The paper announcing the first confirmed detection of gravitational waves was published in the traditional way, as a PDF, but with a supplemental IPython notebook. The notebook walks through the work that generated every figure in the paper. Anyone who wants to can run the code for themselves, tweaking parts of it as they see fit, playing with the calculations to get a better handle on how each one works. At a certain point in the notebook, it gets to the part where the signal that generated the gravitational waves is processed into sound, and this you can play in your browser, hearing for yourself what the scientists heard first, the bloop of two black holes colliding.
At every turn, IPython chose the way that was more inclusive, to the point where it’s no longer called “IPython”: The project rebranded itself as “Jupyter” in 2014 to recognize the fact that it was no longer just for Python. The Jupyter notebook, as it’s called, is like a Mathematica notebook but for any programming language.
When you improve the praxis of science, the dream is that you’ll improve its products, too. Leibniz’s notation, by making it easier to do calculus, expanded the space of what it was possible to think. The grand scientific challenges of our day are as often as not computational puzzles: How to integrate billions of base pairs of genomic data, and 10 times that amount of proteomic data, and historical patient data, and the results of pharmacological screens into a coherent account of how somebody got sick and what to do to make them better? How to make actionable an endless stream of new temperature and precipitation data, and oceanographic and volcanic and seismic data? How to build, and make sense of, a neuron-by-neuron map of a thinking brain? Equipping scientists with computational notebooks, or some evolved form of them, might bring their minds to a level with problems now out of reach.
Science  research  publishing  IFTTT  mathematica  via:popular 
18 days ago by rauschen
The Scientific Paper Is Obsolete. Here's What's Next. - The Atlantic
The idea for IPython’s notebook interface came from Mathematica. Pérez admired the way that Mathematica notebooks encouraged an exploratory style. “You would sketch something out—because that’s how you reason about a problem, that’s how you understand a problem.” Computational notebooks, he said, “bring that idea of live narrative out ... You can think through the process, and you’re effectively using the computer, if you will, as a computational partner, and as a thinking partner.”

Instead of building a specialized, stand-alone application, let alone spending man-centuries on it, the IPython team—Pérez was now joined by Brian Granger, a physics professor at California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo; and Min Ragan-Kelley, a Ph.D. student at UC Berkeley working in computational physics—built their notebooks as simple web pages. The interface is missing Mathematica’s Steve Jobsian polish, and its sophistication. But by latching itself to the web, IPython got what is essentially free labor: Any time Google, Apple, or a random programmer open-sourced a new plotting tool, or published better code for rendering math, the improvement would get rolled into IPython. “It has paid off handsomely,” Pérez said.

The paper announcing the first confirmed detection of gravitational waves was published in the traditional way, as a PDF, but with a supplemental IPython notebook. The notebook walks through the work that generated every figure in the paper. Anyone who wants to can run the code for themselves, tweaking parts of it as they see fit, playing with the calculations to get a better handle on how each one works. At a certain point in the notebook, it gets to the part where the signal that generated the gravitational waves is processed into sound, and this you can play in your browser, hearing for yourself what the scientists heard first, the bloop of two black holes colliding.
science  publishing  mathematica  python 
19 days ago by madamim
The Scientific Paper Is Obsolete. Here's What's Next. - The Atlantic
I think this is fairly flawed in a number of ways but the underlying point about sharing code/data is totally valid. Also, some of the content about papers being hard to understand is also a bit odd because it's not like they are aimed at a general audience.
science  publishing  papers  notebooks  mathematica 
20 days ago by mr_stru
Notebook computing
Nice article about the value of Jupyter and Mathematica notebooks for science
science  publishing  jupyter  notebooks  mathematica  wolfram  via:metafilter 
21 days ago by nelson
Mathematica の繰り返し - ヒューリンクス(HULINKS)ブログ
「foreach my $elem (@LIST) {...}] => 「Do[..., {elem, LIST}]」、
「map {my $elem = $_; ...} @LIST」 => 「Table[..., {elem, LIST}]」、
「map(&SUB, @LIST)」=> 「Map[func, LIST]」、その他後で調べる
mathematica  Perl 
24 days ago by kmiyazaki

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