marcweidenbaum   5

Is the Printed Circuit Board a Form of Musical Notation? | NewMusicBox
"In time I wasn’t plugging in my newly arrived modules so quickly. I was spending more time looking at them, admiring their structures, noting aspects unique to various individual companies. Some modules have lovely design flourishes, bits of fantastic line art right there on the circuit board, so enticing it threatens to give “cyberpunk” a good name all over again. Others have funny little phrases, puns on functionality, like where the power supply goes, or little axioms that both gently mock and encourage the beholder—Barbara Kruger by way of circuitry. This is what I now first look for when I unpack a new module." Really nice Marc Weidenbaum piece on the aesthetics and semantics of circuit-board design.
pcbs  electronics  music  marcweidenbaum  writing  circuitboard 
june 2017 by infovore
10 Great 2016 iOS + Android Music/Sound Apps
Marc's list of portable music apps for the end of the year. Filed away.
music  ios  apps  sound  marcweidenbaum 
january 2017 by infovore
And Disquiet.com Turns 20 Years Old
"I try to write at Disquiet.com every day, and plan to continue to. I often quiet down toward the end of the year, making plans for the one to come. Another year lies ahead, a year of more daily recommendations of online listening, of interviews with musicians, coders, and artists (three categories that exist in combination far more than they did in 1996), and field notes. If you’ve read this far — by which I mean this article, not for two decades — I just want to say thanks. It’s a central pleasure of my life." I too have greatly enjoyed discovering Marc's writing - and the Junto. I might really have to do something about the absence of writing in my life again.
blogging  music  marcweidenbaum  writing 
december 2016 by infovore
The Wire Magazine on the Disquiet Junto
"He writes reviews of music that doesn’t exist yet and then gets internet strangers to make it." (disclaimer: I am one of those Internet Strangers).
thewire  wire  disquietjunto  marcweidenbaum  music  composition 
june 2016 by infovore
The Hauntology of Daily Life — Medium
"Next time I need to go to the café, I will know exactly where it is, just as I know that another café that I frequent is across the street — one block closer to the Pacific ocean — from a dim sum place I eat lunch at frequently, and just as I know that a favorite Vietnamese restaurant is on the same block as the movie theater that is closest to my home. I could not tell you the cross streets of any of these businesses, but I know where they all are in relation to each other. That is how memories are cemented. At least that is how my brain makes memories, through context, correlation, proximity.

And through incidence. There are different types of proximity, and though the word suggests physical nearness, there is also simply chance incident. On the way to the dim sum restaurant, there is a spot where I think about feathers, because a dead bird was left there for several weeks, and for weeks after its carcass had disappeared, individual feathers fluttered in the bushes and grass.

Key for my memory is sound, certain parallels between physical places and the sounds that I associate with them.

I do not think of alarms when I walk past the neighborhood fire station, but I do think about the crying in a nursery ward. This is because of a sign on the firehouse door that announces the place as a safe haven for unwanted newborns. The sign shows a child sleeping in a pair of hands, yet I cannot walk by that firehouse without the helpless calls of infants ringing in my mind’s ears.

There is a stretch of road between Pasadena and Glendale where I will always hear the rhythmic threadbare minimal techno of Monolake’s album Cinemascope, even if Led Zeppelin is blasting on the radio,even if I am deep in conversation on the phone or with a fellow passenger, even if the windows are open and letting in the sirens of passing police cars, all of which has happened. More than a decade ago, on a visit to the Los Angeles area, I blasted a CD of that album in a rental car after a long day of meetings, on my way to visit a friend across town, and though I have never again sat in that particular car, and I have long since parted ways with that employer, and my physical copy of the Monolake album is buried in a box in my closet, the music still hovers on the highway, waiting for me to trigger it simply by driving through it.

And I cannot step into a particular corner of my home’s small backyard without having the novelist China Miéville tell me a story — more specifically, tell me a particular part of a story. For at some point, many years ago, I struggled in that spot with a heavy ration of weeds, and while I pulled at the weeds, tried to separate them from the ground without leaving their crepuscular roots intact, a recording of Miéville reading from one of his stories played through the headphones attached to my MP3 player. I was fixed in that spot long enough for the story to take root. It is as if the story lingers there, set on a loop on an invisible jukebox, and I can access it if I get just inside a specific zone of the yard."
memory  mapping  place  senses  sound  sounds  2013  marcweidenbaum  audio  music  losangeles  context  proximity  chinamieville  brain  mameories  associations 
august 2013 by robertogreco

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2013  apps  associations  audio  blogging  brain  chinamieville  circuitboard  composition  context  disquietjunto  electronics  ios  losangeles  mameories  mapping  memory  music  pcbs  place  proximity  senses  sound  sounds  thewire  wire  writing 

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