learning_journeys   7

Informed Patient? Don’t Bet On It
MARCH 1, 2017 | The New York Times | By MIKKAEL A. SEKERES, M.D. and TIMOTHY D. GILLIGAN, M.D.

■ Ask us to use common words and terms. If your doctor says that you’ll end up with a “simple iliac ileal conduit” or a “urostomy,” feel free to say “I don’t understand those words. Can you explain what that means?”

■ Summarize back what you heard. “So I should split my birth control pills in half and take half myself and give the other half to my boyfriend?” That way, if you’ve misunderstood what we did a poor job of explaining, there will be a chance to straighten it out: “No, that’s not right. You should take the whole pill yourself.”

■ Request written materials, or even pictures or videos. We all learn in different ways and at different paces, and “hard copies” of information that you can take time to absorb at home may be more helpful than the few minutes in our offices.

■ Ask for best-case, worst-case, and most likely scenarios, along with the chance of each one occurring.

■ Ask if you can talk to someone who has undergone the surgery, or received the chemotherapy. That person will have a different kind of understanding of what the experience was like than we do.

■ Explore alternative treatment options, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. “If I saw 10 different experts in my condition, how many would recommend the same treatment you are recommending?”
■ Take notes, and bring someone else to your appointments to be your advocate, ask the questions you may be reluctant to, and be your “accessory brain,” to help process the information we are trying to convey.
Communicating_&_Connecting  clarity  doctor's_visits  questions  mens'_health  learning_journeys  medical  probabilities  plain_English  referrals  note_taking  appointments  advocacy  worst-case  best-case  medical_communication 
march 2017 by jerryking
Where to Look for Insight
Mohanbir Sawhney Sanjay Khosla
FROM THE NOVEMBER 2014
Innovation isn’t a department. It’s a mindset that should permeate your entire enterprise.

No matter the venue, the feedstock for innovation is insight—an imaginative understanding of an internal or external opportunity that can be tapped to improve efficiency, generate revenue, or boost engagement. Insights can be about stakeholder needs, market dynamics, or even how your company works.

Here are Seven Insight Channels
Anomalies

Examine deviations from the norm
Do you see unexpectedly high or low revenue or share in a market or segment? Surprise performance from a business process or a company unit?

Confluence

Find macro trend intersections

What key economic, behavioral, technological, or demographic trends do you see? How are they combining to create opportunities?

Frustrations

Pinpoint deficiencies in the system

Where are customer pain points for your products, services, or solutions? Which organizational processes or practices annoy you and your colleagues?

Orthodoxies

Question conventional beliefs
Are there assumptions or beliefs in your industry that go unexamined? Toxic behaviors or procedures at your company that go unchallenged?

Extremities

Exploit deviance
What can you learn from the behaviors and needs of your leading-edge or laggard customers, employees, or suppliers?

Voyages

Learn from immersion elsewhere
How are your stakeholders’ needs influenced by their sociocultural context?

Analogies

Borrow from other industries or organizations
What successful innovations do you see applied in other disciplines? Can you adapt them for your own?
customer_insights  HBR  analogies  anomalies  toxic_behaviors  trends  pain_points  assumptions  innovation  insights  conventional_wisdom  travel  laggards  copycats  dilemmas  extremes  orthodoxy  immersive  deviance  learning_journeys  leading-edge  unexpected  mindsets  frictions  opportunities  opportunistic  consumer_behavior  feedstock 
november 2014 by jerryking
What Thomas L. Friedman Didn’t Report About Getting Hired by Google | LinkedIn
Gary BurnisonInfluencer
Chief Executive Officer at Korn/Ferry International
What Thomas L. Friedman Didn’t Report About Getting Hired by Google
March 13, 2014

learning agility is the leading predictor of success – No. 1 above intelligence and education.

While Friedman reported on one company, I am writing to tell you that learning agility will get you a job anywhere – from Walmart to Twitter, to Google, to Facebook, to GM, to Tata, to L’Oreal and more.

And, in today’s workplace, jobs and job responsibilities change quickly. So, the key to retaining a job and growing in your career is learning agility.

The Peter Principle, which asserts that employees will continue to get promoted until they reach their highest level of incompetence, has evolved. Today employees don’t need to get promoted to become incompetent. They will become incompetent in their current jobs if they don’t grow, adapt, and evolve.

If you stop growing and learning, your job will outgrow you. If you grow and learn faster than your job, employers will always want you.

The other thing that Friedman did not tell you is that the “learning agile” uncover new challenges, solicit direct feedback, self-reflect, and find ways to get jobs done resourcefully. They see unique patterns and make fresh connections that others overlook.

A Korn Ferry study of sales managers bears this out: The higher an individual’s learning agility, the more promotions he or she received during a 10-year period. Similarly, longitudinal studies observed that managers who modified their behaviors, exhibited flexibility, and accepted mistakes as part of learning new competencies, were more successful than their counterparts as they climbed the corporate ladder.

There are five factors to Learning Agility: mental agility, self-awareness, people agility, change agility, and results agility.

The net-net is that most successful executives are able to move out of their comfort zone, take risks, learn from mistakes, and begin anew as they encounter new assignments. The successful leaders continually learn, bend, and flex as their work world changed.
LinkedIn  Korn_Ferry  Google  Tom_Friedman  hiring  character_traits  learning  learning_curves  learning_journeys  learning_agility  mental_dexterity  self-awareness 
march 2014 by jerryking
Dialing For Growth
OCTOBER 30, 2006 | BusinessWeek |By Jack and Suzy Welch
Jack and Suzy Welch

A red flag here, however. Visiting companies to watch them in action can be great, but the exercise is pointless unless your own people are ready to embrace outside ideas. If they're not, some adjustment to your culture is probably necessary. To do that, you've got to kill any not-invented-here syndrome floating around your organization and replace it with a new value of open-mindedness. You can jump-start that process by using praise, money, and promotions to celebrate employees who find outside ideas and bring them back home. Before you know it, you'll find yourself deluged with good ideas from every quarter.
Jack_Welch  GE  advice  growth  not-invented-here  benchmarking  research  research_methods  learning_journeys 
april 2012 by jerryking
Seeing old problems through fresh eyes
May 11, 2011| Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER
Practically Radical
By William C. Taylor
William Morrow, 293 pages, $31.99

A new book by the co-founder of Fast Company magazine says it's possible to transform an organization by doing two things: 1. Look at the familiar as if you've never seen it before 2. Find inspiration from outside your own field...two premises. The first notion is that what you see shapes how you change. The best leaders, he argues, demonstrate a capacity for "vuja dé."

We all know what déjà vu is: Looking at an unfamiliar situation and feeling as if you have seen it before.

Vuja dé is the opposite: Looking at a familiar situation - be it the industry you have worked in for years, or the products you have been selling for ages - as if you have never seen them before.

Interestingly, often that involves looking to the past to figure out why your organization was successful and figuring out how to refresh it with the insights of the founders....second principle is that where you look shapes what you see. If you run a hospital, what you see will differ if you look at other hospitals for inspiration or to an auto plant.

In this case, vuja dé involves looking outside your organization to discover what you may have been missing.
problem_solving  Harvey_Schachter  book_reviews  outsiders  inspiration  creative_renewal  learning_journeys  fresh_eyes  books 
october 2011 by jerryking
The Slow Hunch: How Innovation is Created Through Group Intelligence
By Dan Rowinski / June 9, 2011

Chance favors the connected mind. That is what author Steven B. Johnson says to those looking for the next big idea. Johnson is the author of "Where Ideas Come From" a book that looks at the macro trends on how innovation evolves.

Ideas are rarely created through a "eureka" moment....Johnson believes that ideas are born of a "slow hunch" that are made possible through periods of technological innovation and evolution. If you are creating a startup, where do you get your ideas from?

Innovation is often made possible by the evolution of networked possibilities....
The Hive Mind & Collective Intelligence

"It is just this idea that if you diversify and have an electric range of interests and you are constantly getting interesting stories about things that you do not know that much about or are adjacent to your particular field of expertise you are much more likely to come up with innovative ideas," Johnson told ReadWriteWeb.

The same approach would work well for developers and innovators working on the next technology breakthrough. Startup founders should take step back from their project and ask what type of similar projects have been undertaken in a completely different field and see if those lessons can be applied to their project.

"The trick is to look at something different and borrow ideas. It is like saying 'this worked for that field, if we put it here what would it do in this new context?'" Johnson said.

In today's world, the ability to branch out of your field of expertise has been made much easier through social media. You can follow what is happening in your niche through a specifically created Twitter list, but it is also beneficial to create lists of people working in different sectors as well.

"The important thing is that this is not some kind of hive-mind wisdom of the crowds, collective intelligence network smarts," Johnson said. "The unit is still the individual or the small group. There are some examples of group intelligence. This is an example instead of taking individuals in small groups and making them smarter by connecting them to a wider range of influences."
collective_intelligence  innovation  grouping  Steven_Johnson  start_ups  chance  probabilities  idea_generation  ideas  Communicating_&_Connecting  cross-pollination  cross-disciplinary  interconnections  learning_journeys  connected_learning  wisdom_of_crowds 
october 2011 by jerryking
Independent Street : To Solve a Problem, Try Asking Another Company
June 12, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | blog post by Wendy Bounds
on how company companies are traveling to meet with managers from other
companies that have solved problems similar to theirs.
learning_journeys  Gwendolyn_Bounds  business  innovation  entrepreneurship  ideas  problems  idea_generation  problem_solving  questions  brainstorming  learning_curves 
february 2009 by jerryking

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