landvaluetax   10

Henry George’s Land Value Tax: An Idea Whose Time Has Come? - American Affairs Journal
...to get genuine housing diversity at more affordable prices in desirable towns and cities—and to encourage better urbanism in less popular towns and cities—it is necessary to take land speculation out of the development equation. And this is the source of today’s renewed interest in Henry George and the land value tax.
housing  taxes  georgism  land  landvaluetax  urban  rural 
12 weeks ago by xavi
Twitter
Without a and the abolishment of other monopolies, the benefit of will be lost within 5 years
UBI  landvaluetax  from twitter_favs
october 2017 by iand
Basic income isn’t just a nice idea. It's a birthright | Global Development Professionals Network | The Guardian
Once a fringe idea, basic income is now speeding its way into the public imagination. Finland is running a two-year experiment in basic income. Utrecht in the Netherlands is conducting a trial, too. Y Combinator is trying it out in Oakland in the US. Scotland looks likely to follow suit. And cash transfer programs have already proven to be successful in Namibia, India, and dozens of other developing countries, sparking what some scholars have billed as “a development revolution from the global South”. In Brazil, to cite just one example, cash transfers helped to cut poverty rates in half in less than a single decade.

But the success of basic income – in both the north and south – all depends on how we frame it. Will it be cast as a form of charity by the rich? Or will it be cast as a right for all?

Thomas Paine was among the first to argue that a basic income should be introduced as a kind of compensation for dispossession.
economics  land  LandValueTax 
march 2017 by juliusbeezer
The Totally Doable Slate of Economic Reforms That Conservatives Are Losing Their Minds Over | Demos
[References this article: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/five-economic-reforms-millennials-should-be-fighting-for-20140103 ]

"Jesse Myerson has a piece at The Rolling Stone detailing five economic reforms he believes Millennials shoud be fighting for. His proposed reforms are a job guarantee, a universal basic income, a land value tax, a sovereign wealth fund, and state banks. I do not generally care for framing that talks about what Millennials should be fighting for because it does not really make any sense, but the five reforms he lists are basically doable and have been written about here and elsewhere before.

Nonetheless, a massive conservative backlash ensued on Twitter in response to the piece. On some level, this kind of reaction is to be expected. Conservatives prefer our institutions as they exist and the way they distribute power, income, and wealth in society. But the conservative backlash did not center around how they just prefer another system. Instead, it was almost universally premised on the idea that these reforms are fundamentally impossible. This is a popular conservative rhetorical move because declaring impossible all of the things that are so much more appealing than what they have to offer is the only real way to advocate the terrible things they support.

Nonetheless, with the exception of Myerson's call for a job guarantee, all of the other reforms he proposes—a universal basic income, a land value tax, a sovereign wealth fund, and public banks—are clearly possible because they already exist in the world.

Universal Basic Income… Land Value Tax… Sovereign Wealth Fund… Public Banks"

[See also: http://digbysblog.blogspot.com/2014/01/pulling-hard-on-left-end-of-rope-makes.html ]
mattbruenig  economics  policy  jessemyerson  universalbasicincome  landvaluetax  sovereignwealthfund  publicbanks  employment  work  2014  ubi 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Tax property, not people, for a fairer society | Business | The Guardian
"Levies on land values do not depress or distort wealth creation and are easy to assess, cheap to collect and hard to avoid"<br />
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"So not only do we get a tax that is easy and cheap to collect, it would be difficult for the super rich to avoid with their offshore trusts and company ownership structures, and it would also lower the value of the asset that is stifling social mobility – property."
2011  taxes  taxation  propertytax  property  land  society  fairness  wealth  power  control  vat  europe  oecd  lvt  landvaluetax  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco

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