labor   15595

« earlier    

Opinion | Your iPhone Didn’t Create the Gig Economy - The New York Times
technology does not usually drive social change. On the contrary, social change is typically driven by decisions we make about how to organize our world. Only later does technology swoop in, accelerating and consolidating those changes.

This insight is crucial for anyone concerned about the insecurity and other shortcomings of the gig economy.
sharing-economy  gig-economy  uber  labor 
4 hours ago by jomc
Rebuilding Worker Voice in Today's Economy - Roosevelt Institute
"Workers are increasingly powerless in the 21st century economy. Working people have few rights on the job, corporations and wealthy individuals hold outsized influence in politics and policymaking, economic inequality is vast and deep, and economic mobility is out of reach for most. Most notably, the unionization rate—a key measure of worker voice and worker agency—has dropped rapidly since the early 1980s. These trends all underscore the need for fundamental labor law reform in America. In Rebuilding Worker Voice in Today’s Economy, Kate Andrias and Brishen Rogers argue that labor law reform in the U.S. must be guided by one core principle: It must guarantee all workers a voice in their workplaces, in the broader economy, and in our democracy. Read the two-page summary here. To achieve this principle, the authors propose for key ways to rewrite labor law: Labor law should provide rights to all workers, in all economic sectors. Labor law should protect and promote workplace unionization. Labor law should encourage sectoral-level bargaining. Labor law should protect workers’ fundamental rights to strike, picket, and engage in other collective action. We cannot have an inclusive and just society until workers truly have a voice. Labor law reform alone, however, will not foster economic and political equality, nor can it fully tackle the challenges facing workers in America today. Rebuilding a more just and equal economy and democracy will be a long-term project. Fundamental, structural labor law reform is central to that project."
labor  unions  activism 
yesterday by tsuomela
A Blueprint for Calling the Question
"Politicians are paying attention to socialists these days. We should compel candidates to adopt pro-worker laws, pick fights with business, and talk openly about class conflict."
labor  unions  activism 
yesterday by tsuomela
Bricolage… or the Impossibility of Pollution - e-flux Architecture - e-flux
In the early 1980s, architect Yona Friedman and artist Jean-Pierre Giovanelli undertook a project titled une intervention sur le déchet (“an intervention on the scrap”).1 The project entailed a four-phase process: First, during the “Phase of Accumulation,” Friedman and Giovanelli amassed what they described as scrap parts from “our sophisticated technologies.” During the subsequent “Phase of Transformation,” these scraps were distributed among “artisanal populations” in non-specified areas of Africa and there subject to a process of “free transformation.” For the next “Phase of Recuperation,” the altered detritus was shipped back to Europe. And finally, during the “Phase of Reinjection,” the resulting art objects were exhibited and sold at a Parisian gallery, with the financial proceeds remitted to Africa....

the devaluation significant here is not that of individual creativity but rather of societal modes of transmitting knowledge. We can only guess the likelihood that the “phase of transformation” had been undertaken in a former French colony, perhaps in one of the many West African cities where ironwork or bronze-work had long been domains of technical expertise. To present this labor as spontaneous bricolage, it was necessary to erase local knowledges and histories by omitting any indication (save the signifier “Africa”) of where the objects were produced. Although Friedman and Giovanelli at least reminded their audience that these African bricoleurs had come from “artisanal populations” (hence, not lacking in trained skill), the non-specificity of the artisanal expertise in question, along with the vague designation of “Africa,” helped set the stage for a growing neoliberal conception of the haphazard creativity of the Third-World informal economic sector—creativity that had to become unbound from its own structured systems and then re-channeled into a global market....

Once inserted within the ambit of modernity, the figure of the bricoleur in urban and economic discourses serves to justify the redistribution of financial risk, in the move from the planned urbanization and state-led industrialization of the postcolony to a neo-liberal model of economic austerity, privatization, and individual entrepreneurship. The bricoleur justifies this model because they can cobble together shelter and commodities from the material detritus generated by north-south inequalities. They can turn the effects of austerity measures to good because the nature of bricolage is not to turn something into something else, but to make something out of nothing. This nothing was to come not only in the form of austerity but also, as Friedman and Giovanelli had divined, in the form of industrial and electronic pollution—the principal ingredients for Third-World bricolage....

Once inserted within the ambit of modernity, the figure of the bricoleur in urban and economic discourses serves to justify the redistribution of financial risk, in the move from the planned urbanization and state-led industrialization of the postcolony to a neo-liberal model of economic austerity, privatization, and individual entrepreneurship. The bricoleur justifies this model because they can cobble together shelter and commodities from the material detritus generated by north-south inequalities. They can turn the effects of austerity measures to good because the nature of bricolage is not to turn something into something else, but to make something out of nothing. This nothing was to come not only in the form of austerity but also, as Friedman and Giovanelli had divined, in the form of industrial and electronic pollution—the principal ingredients for Third-World bricolage....

Once inserted within the ambit of modernity, the figure of the bricoleur in urban and economic discourses serves to justify the redistribution of financial risk, in the move from the planned urbanization and state-led industrialization of the postcolony to a neo-liberal model of economic austerity, privatization, and individual entrepreneurship. The bricoleur justifies this model because they can cobble together shelter and commodities from the material detritus generated by north-south inequalities. They can turn the effects of austerity measures to good because the nature of bricolage is not to turn something into something else, but to make something out of nothing. This nothing was to come not only in the form of austerity but also, as Friedman and Giovanelli had divined, in the form of industrial and electronic pollution—the principal ingredients for Third-World bricolage....

The recent Maker Culture movement offers a particularly legible demonstration of how pollution becomes recast as non-pollution—an operation which is aesthetic, ideological, and economic. ...

In the case of Agbogbloshie Makerspace Platform (AMP), founded by two Boston-trained architects, the relationship between Maker Culture and pollution is made explicit, as their operation is sited at Accra’s notorious international e-waste dump, Agbogbloshie. AMP’s co-founders see design as a way of restoring dignity to a part of the city that has been the target of much negative attention, due to extensive press coverage and blogging related to the issue of international e-waste. AMP draws on the existing practices of e-recycling that have long formed the basis of Agbobbloshie’s economy and hones these practices through the inculcation of new skills and knowledge in design, material science, and construction. In this sense, the endeavor is a laudable one. Nonetheless, processes of e-recycling at Agbogbloshie involve burning off plastic encasements and circuit boards, which emits highly toxic fumes, then sorting through the remaining metals and components for resale. Despite the persistent toxicity of the processes involved, AMP’s stated ambition is to “move beyond the notion of ‘e-waste.’” The virtuosity of design and aesthetic representation (as showcased on AMP’s website) make the claim that the highly toxic effects of e-waste dumping and the still-more toxic processes involved in e-recycling are to be overcome through aesthetic bricolage as a technique of onto-semiotic transformation....

In the case of Agbogbloshie Makerspace Platform (AMP), founded by two Boston-trained architects, the relationship between Maker Culture and pollution is made explicit, as their operation is sited at Accra’s notorious international e-waste dump, Agbogbloshie. AMP’s co-founders see design as a way of restoring dignity to a part of the city that has been the target of much negative attention, due to extensive press coverage and blogging related to the issue of international e-waste. AMP draws on the existing practices of e-recycling that have long formed the basis of Agbobbloshie’s economy and hones these practices through the inculcation of new skills and knowledge in design, material science, and construction. In this sense, the endeavor is a laudable one. Nonetheless, processes of e-recycling at Agbogbloshie involve burning off plastic encasements and circuit boards, which emits highly toxic fumes, then sorting through the remaining metals and components for resale. Despite the persistent toxicity of the processes involved, AMP’s stated ambition is to “move beyond the notion of ‘e-waste.’” The virtuosity of design and aesthetic representation (as showcased on AMP’s website) make the claim that the highly toxic effects of e-waste dumping and the still-more toxic processes involved in e-recycling are to be overcome through aesthetic bricolage as a technique of onto-semiotic transformation.
bricolage  making  repair  e-waste  Global_South  labor 
3 days ago by shannon_mattern
Front Line: Union Activity Showing Recent Spikes - Area Development
Although unions’ influence in the U.S. has diminished over the last four decades, they are still playing a key role in manufacturing and, more recently, the distribution sector.
area-development-features  frontline  labor  workforce  unions  right-to-work  economic-development  site-selection  manufacturing 
3 days ago by areadevelopment
Nannies are under constant surveillance. Online care sites are making it worse.
In other employment contexts, this type of scrutiny might get backlash for being invasive or potentially discriminatory. But the hiring norms for domestic work have always been different, in large part due to the intimacy of the work
labor  emotional-labor  domestic-workers  surveillance  childcare 
5 days ago by jomc
Ralph Nader On What He Thinks Apple Should Do With Its Excess Billions (NPR)
We once worked for Mr. Nader, and once worked for Apple Retail before that (and hold a few measly shares). While we can quibble with some of his suggestions, based on our own outside-in speculation, we particularly agree with one sentiment: So much profit on the backs of labor not making a living wage is a moral and ethical rotten spot. Does it go to the core?
clippings  Apple  labor  corporatism  stocks  Ralph+Nader  Nader 
7 days ago by mjb

« earlier    

related tags

1690  1783  2010  2016  2017  2018  abuse  academia  activism  administration  adrianheathfield  advising  agesegregation  agriculture  ai  algorithms  alienation  allende  amazon  and  anthropology  apple  architecture  area-development-features  arrested  articles  artificialintelligence  atlas  attaq  authoritarianism  automation  beaten  behavioral-gen  biodet  blocked  bricolage  brownstone  burnout  business  capital-vs-labor  capital  capitalism  care  chief  childcare  children  chile  civil-liberty  class-war  class_struggles_in_america  clippings  coding  coercion  collective.bargaining  colonialism  commerce  commodification  communication  communism  community  comparison  computation  connecticut  context  contingentwork  contract_enforcement  contracts  contradiction  control  corporations  corporatism  couples?  covering  crime  culture  curation  data  decolonization  delaware  democracy  deschooling  design  designsystems  dignity  direction  displacement  dividends  does  domestic-workers  dsa  dust  dystopia  e-waste  eastern-europe  ecology  ecommerce  economic-development  economic.geography  economics  economy  education  effectiveness  egalitarianism-hierarchy  emotional-labor  empathy  employment  england  entrepreneurial  environmental-effects  ethics  ethnicity  europe  exploitation  feminism  field-study  filipino  finance  flood  for  forced+labor  from:bloomberg  frompocket  frontline  fys  gap  gender  gig-economy  gigeconomy  global_south  globalization  google  grain  gristmill  growth  gulf_region  hackerspaces  have_read  health  healthcare  hierarchy  history  homelessness  homo-hetero  horizontality  hospitality  how  howwelearn  human+trafficking  human  humanrights  humans  ideo  immigration  income  inequality  infrastructure  injuries  institutions  interdisciplinary  internet  iritrogoff  isabelrodríguez  job-security  jobs  journalists  juliaticona  just  justice  labor-unions  labor_market  landmark  latecapitalism  law  lcproject  learning.communiites  learning  left-wing  lesbian  lillyirani  louismoreno  machine  makers  makerspaces  making  management  manufacturing  market_failures_in_everything  markets  marx  massimilianomollona  material  materials  mechanicalturk  media_city  migration  mill  minimumwage  mining  missouri  mitchaltman  money  mythology  nader  naidu.suresh  natural-experiment  networked_life  networkedsociety  newspapers  newyork  norastenfeld  nthsea  nurses  oecd  on  op-ed  openstudioproject  opinion  org:nat  organizing  orwellian  paradox  parenting  passed  payment  pinochet  police-brutality  police  policy  polisci  political-science  political_economy  politics  portlant  power  precarity  prejudice  prison+labor  processing  productivity  propertyrights  protocols  proudhon  psychology  public_space  publicsector  quarry  race  racism  ralph+nader  reading  regulation  repair  republicans  research  resistance  restoration  retail  right-to-work  rights  rynboren  s-factor  saudi-arabia  scale  school  schooliness  schooling  schools  scotland  sense  service  sfsh  sharing-economy  shift  shipping  silicon-valley  siliconvalley  site-selection  skrivepress  slack  slang  smithsonian  social-psychology  social-structure  socialism  sociology  software  solidarity  states  statistics  status  stefanoharney  stock-buybacks  stocks  stone  strike  strikes  stripe  study  supply-chain  supplychains  surveillance  sweden  teachers  tech-workers  tech  technology  tesla  the  tightrope  to  too-big  toshare  trade  transaction  transdisciplinary  transportation  trumka  trump  turker  tweet-threads-that-should-be-blog-posts  uaw  uber  unions  unschooling  ups  urban  urbanism  us  usa  variance-components  vermont  visibility  voters  vulnerability  wages  walks  water  wawa  weaken  west_virginia  whathavewedone  while  windmill  work  workers_rights  workforce  writing 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: