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And Repeat — Color Dot Font
The Color Dot Font is a font composed entirely of colored circles. In the Color Dot Font, each Latin character is replaced with a circle of a certain color. For example, an “a” character is represented by a blue circle, a “t” by a yellow circle, and so forth. Available as a TTF file, the font can be installed and used on any computer operating system.
color  design  typography  fonts  kottke 
3 days ago by dcrall
Crafting Eight Large Rafters for a Church Spire Using Medieval Tools & Techniques
In the spire of a Swedish church built around the end of the 12th century, eight large rafters (that are in spectacularly good shape considering they’re 800 years old) appear to be fashioned from the same tree using a technique that had not been documented before. So, using only medieval woodworking tools and techniques, a team set out to prove that those rafters could have been made in that way.
kottke  videos  youtube  wood  woodworking 
5 days ago by dcrall
Cooking As A Service
If they can collectively bring down the cost of outsourced cooking another 20-30%, I think the economics start looking pretty compelling for outsourced cooking (including delivery) to effectively pay for itself out of the savings incurred by paying for ingredients and cooking equipment in bulk. At that point, kitchens start to truly become optional.
kottke  food  economics  restaurants 
5 days ago by dcrall
Norway’s Proposed New Passports Are Beautiful
Back in 2014, a design studio called Neue won a national competition to redesign the Norwegian passport. What they came up with is bold and beautiful.
kottke  design  norway 
9 days ago by dcrall
How to Make Data-Driven Visual Essays
Ilia Blinderman of The Pudding has written a pair of essays about how to make data-driven visual essays. Part 1 covers working with data.
data  visualization  kottke 
17 days ago by dcrall
Neven Mrgan's tumbl
Hi, good day to you. I have been eating broccoli breakfast sandwiches for breakfast since 2017, and I’m here to spread the good word to you: broccoli breakfast sandwiches are great.
food  recipes  kottke  broccoli 
24 days ago by dcrall
Nord
Created for the clean and uncluttered design pattern to achieve a optimal focus and readability for code syntax highlighting and UI components.
color  vim  design  kottke  intellij 
24 days ago by dcrall
Twenty.
But had I not written all those posts, good and bad, I wouldn’t be who I am today, which, hopefully, is a somewhat wiser person vectoring towards a better version of himself. What the site has become in its best moments — a slightly highfalutin description from the about page: “[kottke.org] covers the essential people, inventions, performances, and ideas that increase the collective adjacent possible of humanity” — has given me a chance to “try on” hundreds of thousands of ideas, put myself into the shoes of all kinds of different thinkers & creators, meet some wonderful people (some of whom I’m lucky enough to call my friends), and engage with some of the best readers on the web (that’s you!), who regularly challenge me on and improve my understanding of countless topics and viewpoints.
blog  kottke  web 
9 weeks ago by terry
Jason Kottke, OG blogger
CI: But what about the cultural significance of blogs now? I mean there are some people like yourself who are still known as bloggers, but I very rarely hear the word ‘blog’ used these days. The younger generation, it seems to me, are not so concerned about having a home online – they’ll just gravitate to whatever tool happens to be popular at the time. So I feel like there’s some sort of a cultural shift that’s happened, that the blog is almost archaic these days.

Jason: Yeah, I think you’re right. I think in the beginning when blogs first came came around, you would tell somebody you had a blog and it would be like…a what? They didn’t know what it was. And then, blogs had their cultural moment and then everybody knew what they were. And like you said, you had a blog and people would be like, oh cool. But now, people are like… oh, that’s kind of quaint, you still have a blog.
blogs  internet  kottke 
9 weeks ago by terry
Creating Livable City Streets
In 1981, a Berkeley urban design professor named Donald Appleyard published a book called Livable Streets (now out of print). In it, he described the results of research he’d done in the late 1960s about the effects of car traffic on the people who live in cities. For the study, he selected three similar residential streets in San Francisco that only differed in the amount of street traffic and then measured how the residents used their streets.
kottke  data  cities 
10 weeks ago by aisthemata
Some Observations on Leaving Neverland
“It is pretty simple. Unless you’re willing to perform complicated mental gymnastics to bamboozle yourself into conspiracy theory land, the plain truth is that Michael Jackson was a pedophile. You can feel however you want about that — he was a monster, he was a man broken by his own abusive childhood & twisted by the vortex of fame — but you cannot simply dismiss it.”
kottke  2019  michaeljackson  music 
10 weeks ago by handcoding
The Heart of the Grand Canyon Map
Published in 1978 by National Geographic, The Heart of the Grand Canyon map is "still considered by many to be the most beautiful map of the area ever created" https://t.co/mcWUXCaNBn

— kottke.org (@kottke) March 1, 2019
ifttt  twitter  kottke 
11 weeks ago by galletto
Gradually, Then Suddenly
Technological change happens in much the same way. Small changes accumulate, and suddenly the world is a different place. Throughout my career at O’Reilly Media, we’ve tracked and fostered a lot of “gradually, then suddenly” movements: the World Wide Web, open source software, big data, cloud computing, sensors and ubiquitous computing, and now the pervasive effects of AI and algorithmic systems on society and the economy.
kottke  oreilly 
11 weeks ago by dcrall

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