kleiner_perkins_caufield_&_byers   12

Apartment Rental Start-Up Zumper Closes $1 Million in Seed Round
Zumper, an apartment rental listing Web site that matches landlords with prospective tenants, announced the closing of its seed funding round on Thursday morning, raising $1 million. The group of initial investors includes Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Andreessen Horowitz, Greylock Partners, NEA and CrunchFund, among others. The team plans to use the capital to expand its engineering resources and continue expanding its rental platform.
General  News  Andreessen_Horowitz  apartment_rentals  Craigslist  CrunchFund  funding_announcements  Greylock_Partners  Kleiner_Perkins_Caufield_&_Byers  NEA  seed_round  venture_capital  Zumper  from google
september 2012 by lem0nayde
Mary Meeker Talks About How Digital Is Changing Everything
We all hear it every day: The Internet and digital technologies are changing everything. It’s become one of those big pronouncements that tends to end a bad conversation or start a good one.

But few people have thought about the subject as clearly and completely as Mary Meeker, the Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers venture capitalist and former Wall Street analyst, who in a presentation at D: All Things Digital illustrated those changes in their historical context.

We’re pretty familiar with the well-worn tales of how the Internet is disrupting the 305-year-old newspaper business, and how mobile phones are messing up the 125-year-old landline telephone business. But Meeker’s presentation goes a lot deeper than that.

The Internet is also disrupting the creation of art, how people document and record the histories of their life, how they take notes, how they borrow money. Roughly a third of Meeker’s 125 slides are devoted to this theme of change and disruption, and when taken as a whole, it’s startling. “A lot of it is stuff you know, but when packaged in a way that you see it all together, I’m overwhelmed,” she said.

“People used to put pictures on their walls, and now they have Facebook,” Meeker said.

Other examples: Groupon and clipping old coupons. Also, going to school. “Education and learning will become as fun as video games,” Meeker said.

Something else that’s changed: How people cope with traffic. During a follow-up interview with Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher, Meeker talked about Waze, a navigation and traffic app for the iPhone, Android and BlackBerry. She described how, when she saw a burning semi truck pulled over on the side of the road, she reported it first to Waze before calling 911.
Commerce  Conferences  D  D10  Enterprise  Media  Mobile  News  Social  CPMs  CyberAgent  Facebook  Google  gree  Kleiner_Perkins_Caufield_&_Byers  Mary_Meeker  mobile_e-commerce  mobile_monetization  mobile_payments  Pandora  Tencent  Waze  Zynga  from google
may 2012 by lem0nayde
Introducing a thermostat Steve Jobs would love: Nest
Can gorgeous design, learning algorithms and millions in venture capital funding make a simple home thermostat as coveted as the iPhone? If anyone can achieve such a lofty goal it’s Tony Fadell, the former chief architect at Apple, who led the development of the iPod and the first three versions of the iPhone, and who left Apple two years ago to start connected thermostat company Nest Labs.

While Palo Alto, Calif.-based Nest has been operating for about a year and a half, has 100 employees, and funding from Kleiner Perkins, Google Ventures and Al Gore’s investment fund, it just came out of stealth on Tuesday to reveal its smart thermostat design and energy efficiency ambitions. Nest says the thermostat is the first “learning thermostat” in the world. It will be available for $250 in mid-November, and can save 20 to 30 percent in a home’s energy consumption.

The idea behind Nest

Fadell explained to me in an interview that he and his wife (who led human resources for Apple) decided to leave Apple about two years ago to spend more time with their young children, and basically retire. But you know how that goes for the ambitious, young, Silicon Valley types. While designing a green home in Tahoe, Calif., Fadell became hung up on the lack of options for a thermostat for the home — they were expensive, not smart, ugly, and basically “crap” says Fadell. And like all good entrepreneurs he thought to himself: there’s got to be a better way.

That option ended up being getting back on the Valley treadmill, and creating one of the most ambitious greentech ventures I’ve seen to date. Nest has raised tens of millions of dollars (they wouldn’t disclose the amount) from high profile venture capitalists including Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Google Ventures, Al Gore’s investment group Generation Capital, and Shasta Ventures.

While other companies are targeting the smart thermostat market (see my article on The next home energy battleground: the smart thermostat) like Opower and Honeywell, Radio Thermostat Company of America and EnergyHub, and EcoFactor, Nest is the first company that has created an end-to-end smart thermostat service, which offers the software, a gadget and a data-filled website. Fadell tells me that everything that the consumer touches has been designed by Nest.

That’s why it has 100 people and have raised a lot of money. The team building the learning algorithms includes Yoky Matsuoka, the former head of innovation at Google, and machine learning expert while Stanford Professor Sebastrian Thrun is an advisor to the company.

How Nest works

What will stand out most to energy nerds like me that look at a lot of thermostats, is the unique design of Nest. The thermostat’s form is a simple circle, with a ring on the outside and a single button, that controls the entire interface. Like the iPod and iPhone, Fadell wanted to make the device intuitive and simple to use and he says for the Nest system to work “it needed to be a coveted, cherished object that sits on your wall.”

In contrast, a major problem with most thermostats is that only two out of five are programmable and of those that are programmable, only 6 percent are actually programmed by the owners, says Fadell. Most thermostats are confusing, boring, or just not smart enough to keep the home owner’s attention.

The Nest thermostat, on the other hand, is supposed to learn your energy consumption behavior and program itself, and then automatically help you save energy in a convenient way. Once installed, the thermostat takes about a week of hardcore learning to recognize the standard way you heat or cool your home, and then recommends settings that are slightly more efficient than what you already do. It also automatically turns down the thermostat at times that are convenient to you. The device also continues to do lighter learning of your behavior via pattern recognition and your manual interaction with it, throughout the life of the device.

The recommendations and energy efficient mode appear to the Nest user as a leaf on the interface, giving direct feedback on energy choices. But the automatic control of heating and cooling will likely have a bigger impact on energy use. The Nest thermostat has five sensors — temperature, humidity, light and two activity sensors — and the activity sensors can notify the device to turn down the heating and cooling when no one is in the house.

The Nest thermostat also has a feature called “time to temperature,” which shows the home owner how long it will take to heat or cool the home. Say, you set the thermostat for 75 degrees, the Nest interface could read, 75 degrees in 25 minutes, letting you know how long it will take. The idea behind that feature is that most people set a thermostat like an accelerator, says Fadell, increasing the temperature or cooling way above or below the actual desired setting. But giving the user more feedback can help curb this problem — think of it like seeing how long a download of a file will take.

In addition to the thermostat device itself, Nest has created mobile apps and a website to be able to remotely turn up or down the thermostat, and also to give far more detailed data about home energy use. For example, you can log into the Nest website and see how much money you’ve saved, how many times you’ve turned up or down your thermostat.

The smart grid and Nest

The Nest thermostat also has Zigbee and Wi-Fi chips, so that it can connect with both your home broadband connection, and also other Zigbee devices like a smart meter, or smart appliances. Fadell says that thermostats are installed only every decade or so, so when the smart grid is fully deployed he wants the Nest thermostat to be ready.

Other companies like Opower and Honeywell are using a smarter thermostat as a way to connect with and control the smart energy home. While a lot of companies have focused on fancy dashboards that can monitor and control a home’s energy consumption, these devices haven’t really caught on, and smarter thermostats seem to be a better way in.

However, Nest is one of the only companies that is directly targeting consumers for its thermostat. Nest plans to sell its thermostat at Best Buy, via building specialty channels, and through its website. Fadell tells me the company wants to “connect with the iPhone generation where it shops.”

But at the same time that Nest is going direct to consumer, the device will clearly have a utility play, which the company is being quiet on right now. Like EcoFactor’s smart thermostat service, I could imagine utilities could work with homes that have Nest installed, to collectively curb energy consumption during peak grid events. This type of service is called demand response, and the saved energy per household helps utilities manage their grids during really hot summer days. Since the device also has ZigBee installed it could potentially connect with utilities’ smart meters, too.

Nest says that home owners can save 20 to 30 percent on their energy bills, which is one of the highest estimated ways to curb home energy use on the market. In contrast, mailed detailed energy bills from Opower are helping home owners cut around 2 percent. EcoFactor says with its similar thermostat service (but no designed gadget) it can get home owners to cut their energy consumption by 17 percent. If Nest actually takes off, utilities will be interested in working with that double digit energy reduction, though I’d like to see that 20 to 30 percent reduction validated in larger real world customer deployments.

My impressions

I think Nest is one of the more ambitious, and cool, ideas I’ve seen in the greentech space. The Nest thermostat is also beautiful and the idea is game changing on its own. However, I’m not so convinced it will work (I want it to! Prove me wrong!). I just don’t know if people will spend $250 on a thermostat, particularly in this economy. You can buy a connected, digital, programmable thermostat for $50, and $100 on the high end.

Also while Nest includes detailed instructions on how to install the thermostat (including a Nest screwdriver), installing a thermostat is actually kind of confusing. I’ve tried to tinker with some of the newer connected thermostats, and usually I end up wishing I hadn’t tried to do this myself — it involves circuit breakers and electrical wiring. Nest says it will offer Nest-approved installers, if people don’t want to install it themselves. Maybe the Best Buy Geek Squad will be able to help with this.

At the end of the day, it will take an army of Nest-inspired early adopters to convince the rest of the country and world to adopt Nest. Silicon Valley will probably rave about it, as they should, but will the other 99 percent of the country get on board with a $250, do-gooder, smart thermostat that’s as pretty as the iPhone?

Related research and analysis from GigaOM Pro:Subscriber content. Sign up for a free trial.
From car to cloud: the future of the in-vehicle app landscapeThe future of mobile: a segment analysis by GigaOM ProFlash analysis: Steve Jobs
aapl  al_gore  Apple  Best_Buy  EnergyHub  Google_Ventures  iPhone  iPod  Kleiner_Perkins_Caufield_&_Byers  Nest  Radio_Thermostat  Steve_Jobs  Yoky_Mastuoka  from google
october 2011 by rahuldave
Introducing a thermostat Steve Jobs would love: Nest
Can gorgeous design, learning algorithms and millions in venture capital funding make a simple home thermostat as coveted as the iPhone? If anyone can achieve such a lofty goal it’s Tony Fadell, the former chief architect at Apple, who led the development of the iPod and the first three versions of the iPhone, and who left Apple two years ago to start connected thermostat company Nest Labs.

While Palo Alto, Calif.-based Nest has been operating for about a year and a half, has 100 employees, and funding from Kleiner Perkins, Google Ventures and Al Gore’s investment fund, it just came out of stealth on Tuesday to reveal its smart thermostat design and energy efficiency ambitions. Nest says the thermostat is the first “learning thermostat” in the world. It will be available for $250 in mid-November, and can save 20 to 30 percent in a home’s energy consumption.

The idea behind Nest

Fadell explained to me in an interview that he and his wife (who led human resources for Apple) decided to leave Apple about two years ago to spend more time with their young children, and basically retire. But you know how that goes for the ambitious, young, Silicon Valley types. While designing a green home in Tahoe, Calif., Fadell became hung up on the lack of options for a thermostat for the home — they were expensive, not smart, ugly, and basically “crap” says Fadell. And like all good entrepreneurs he thought to himself: there’s got to be a better way.

That option ended up being getting back on the Valley treadmill, and creating one of the most ambitious greentech ventures I’ve seen to date. Nest has raised tens of millions of dollars (they wouldn’t disclose the amount) from high profile venture capitalists including Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Google Ventures, Al Gore’s investment group Generation Capital, and Shasta Ventures.

While other companies are targeting the smart thermostat market (see my article on The next home energy battleground: the smart thermostat) like Opower and Honeywell, Radio Thermostat Company of America and EnergyHub, and EcoFactor, Nest is the first company that has created an end-to-end smart thermostat service, which offers the software, a gadget and a data-filled website. Fadell tells me that everything that the consumer touches has been designed by Nest.

That’s why it has 100 people and have raised a lot of money. The team building the learning algorithms includes Yoky Matsuoka, the former head of innovation at Google, and machine learning expert while Stanford Professor Sebastrian Thrun is an advisor to the company.

How Nest works

What will stand out most to energy nerds like me that look at a lot of thermostats, is the unique design of Nest. The thermostat’s form is a simple circle, with a ring on the outside and a single button, that controls the entire interface. Like the iPod and iPhone, Fadell wanted to make the device intuitive and simple to use and he says for the Nest system to work “it needed to be a coveted, cherished object that sits on your wall.”

In contrast, a major problem with most thermostats is that only two out of five are programmable and of those that are programmable, only 6 percent are actually programmed by the owners, says Fadell. Most thermostats are confusing, boring, or just not smart enough to keep the home owner’s attention.

The Nest thermostat, on the other hand, is supposed to learn your energy consumption behavior and program itself, and then automatically help you save energy in a convenient way. Once installed, the thermostat takes about a week of hardcore learning to recognize the standard way you heat or cool your home, and then recommends settings that are slightly more efficient than what you already do. It also automatically turns down the thermostat at times that are convenient to you. The device also continues to do lighter learning of your behavior via pattern recognition and your manual interaction with it, throughout the life of the device.

The recommendations and energy efficient mode appear to the Nest user as a leaf on the interface, giving direct feedback on energy choices. But the automatic control of heating and cooling will likely have a bigger impact on energy use. The Nest thermostat has five sensors — temperature, humidity, light and two activity sensors — and the activity sensors can notify the device to turn down the heating and cooling when no one is in the house.

The Nest thermostat also has a feature called “time to temperature,” which shows the home owner how long it will take to heat or cool the home. Say, you set the thermostat for 75 degrees, the Nest interface could read, 75 degrees in 25 minutes, letting you know how long it will take. The idea behind that feature is that most people set a thermostat like an accelerator, says Fadell, increasing the temperature or cooling way above or below the actual desired setting. But giving the user more feedback can help curb this problem — think of it like seeing how long a download of a file will take.

In addition to the thermostat device itself, Nest has created mobile apps and a website to be able to remotely turn up or down the thermostat, and also to give far more detailed data about home energy use. For example, you can log into the Nest website and see how much money you’ve saved, how many times you’ve turned up or down your thermostat.

The smart grid and Nest

The Nest thermostat also has Zigbee and Wi-Fi chips, so that it can connect with both your home broadband connection, and also other Zigbee devices like a smart meter, or smart appliances. Fadell says that thermostats are installed only every decade or so, so when the smart grid is fully deployed he wants the Nest thermostat to be ready.

Other companies like Opower and Honeywell are using a smarter thermostat as a way to connect with and control the smart energy home. While a lot of companies have focused on fancy dashboards that can monitor and control a home’s energy consumption, these devices haven’t really caught on, and smarter thermostats seem to be a better way in.

However, Nest is one of the only companies that is directly targeting consumers for its thermostat. Nest plans to sell its thermostat at Best Buy, via building specialty channels, and through its website. Fadell tells me the company wants to “connect with the iPhone generation where it shops.”

But at the same time that Nest is going direct to consumer, the device will clearly have a utility play, which the company is being quiet on right now. Like EcoFactor’s smart thermostat service, I could imagine utilities could work with homes that have Nest installed, to collectively curb energy consumption during peak grid events. This type of service is called demand response, and the saved energy per household helps utilities manage their grids during really hot summer days. Since the device also has ZigBee installed it could potentially connect with utilities’ smart meters, too.

Nest says that home owners can save 20 to 30 percent on their energy bills, which is one of the highest estimated ways to curb home energy use on the market. In contrast, mailed detailed energy bills from Opower are helping home owners cut around 2 percent. EcoFactor says with its similar thermostat service (but no designed gadget) it can get home owners to cut their energy consumption by 17 percent. If Nest actually takes off, utilities will be interested in working with that double digit energy reduction, though I’d like to see that 20 to 30 percent reduction validated in larger real world customer deployments.

My impressions

I think Nest is one of the more ambitious, and cool, ideas I’ve seen in the greentech space. The Nest thermostat is also beautiful and the idea is game changing on its own. However, I’m not so convinced it will work (I want it to! Prove me wrong!). I just don’t know if people will spend $250 on a thermostat, particularly in this economy. You can buy a connected, digital, programmable thermostat for $50, and $100 on the high end.

Also while Nest includes detailed instructions on how to install the thermostat (including a Nest screwdriver), installing a thermostat is actually kind of confusing. I’ve tried to tinker with some of the newer connected thermostats, and usually I end up wishing I hadn’t tried to do this myself — it involves circuit breakers and electrical wiring. Nest says it will offer Nest-approved installers, if people don’t want to install it themselves. Maybe the Best Buy Geek Squad will be able to help with this.

At the end of the day, it will take an army of Nest-inspired early adopters to convince the rest of the country and world to adopt Nest. Silicon Valley will probably rave about it, as they should, but will the other 99 percent of the country get on board with a $250, do-gooder, smart thermostat that’s as pretty as the iPhone?

Related research and analysis from GigaOM Pro:Subscriber content. Sign up for a free trial.
From car to cloud: the future of the in-vehicle app landscapeThe future of mobile: a segment analysis by GigaOM ProFlash analysis: Steve Jobs
aapl  al_gore  Apple  Best_Buy  EnergyHub  Google_Ventures  iPhone  iPod  Kleiner_Perkins_Caufield_&_Byers  Nest  Radio_Thermostat  Steve_Jobs  Yoky_Mastuoka  from google
october 2011 by edasque
Bill Joy aims for early failures and bigger impacts
When an investor or entrepreneur makes high-risk bets on early stage companies, failure is always part of the equation. For Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers Partner Bill Joy, he says more of the early-stage greentech startups he invests in with fail early, because he takes on riskier startups. But if those startups make it past the early stage, they can turn into something more meaningful and have a higher-impact on the industry and society.

“I try to have a first  [investment] round that has a 50/50 mortality rate,” said Joy at MIT’s Emerging Technologies Conference on Wednesday. So essentially the early stage startups he likes to back have a 50-percent chance of not working. “Now a 90-percent mortality rate is not a good use of my time. That’s something for the government to back,” added Joy.

Joy has 10 to 12 startups he works with at anyone time, including companies like Siluria, which converts natural gas into ethylene (a key ingredient in plastics) and Renmatix, which makes sugar from biomass that can be turned into biofuel and biochemicals. Joy joined Kleiner six years ago after starting Sun Microsystems in the early ’80s.

The switch from IT to greentech has been “a learning experience,” and Joy says he’s learned enough about physics and chemistry “to not be too dangerous to our [firm's] financial future.” Joy explained: “I felt like I’d done enough with computer industry. So I was happy to be allowed to pioneer for us in this area.”

Another key way to work with failure, is to fail cheaply. Joy says Kleiner will spend a couple million dollars backing an early stage risky company to see if they can help de-risk the investment and add value. But if the company ends up taking more like $20 million to fail, then that’s not good economics for them. Entrepreneur Bill Gross has explained the same thing before.

To find his investments, Joy said the Kleiner team thought about grand challenges that it wanted to solve, like desalinating water for 10 cents per cubic meter — today desalinating water costs closer to $1 per cubic liter, said Joy. Joy would then think about the best way to get to that goal (in the desalination problem, he points to using thermal energy instead of electricity) and then would start looking for scientists that are working on those innovations. Another way is to use the new tools that have been developed in the last decade — carbon nano tubes, robotics, ionic liquids — and apply those to older problems.

When looking at competing technologies, Joy says he uses the “secretary algorithm.” When you hire a new secretary, you can’t just pick the first one you interview because she seems pretty good — you have to get a sense of the quality of the population and then pick the one that stands out, said Joy.

At the end of the day, though, one of the problems with tackling high-risk problems and backing high-risk companies, is that some of these problems and innovations just aren’t scientifically possible. So it’s one of Joy’s jobs to determine at an early point if the company can’t be taken any farther with Kleiner’s funds. That’s the fail early part.

Image courtesy of hans.gerwitz.

Related research and analysis from GigaOM Pro:Subscriber content. Sign up for a free trial.
Green IT’s Q4 Winners: Wind Power, Solar Power, Smart EnergyFlash analysis: lessons from Solyndra’s fallSmart Grid Apps: Six Trends That Will Shape Grid Evolution
@CNN  Amyris  Bill_Joy  DARPA  Kleiner_Perkins  Kleiner_Perkins_Caufield_&_Byers  Renmatix  Siluria  from google
october 2011 by doffm
In Mary Meeker, Kleiner Perkins Looks to the Future
Mary Meeker, the Queen of the Net, in a manner of speaking, is coming home; she’s joining Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers, the white-shoe, Silicon Valley, venture fund. Frankly, there was no better place for her to go. She and KPCB Senior Partner John Doerr have been attached at the hip since the first Internet boom (and then the bubble); she championed Netscape, Excite@Home, AOL, Amazon.com and later Google, which are all Kleiner companies. Doerr, in a 1999 profile of Meeker in The New Yorker, called her “an awesome diviner of opportunity.”

Just like Morgan Stanley, KPCB is run like a traditional corporation, though in this case Doerr is the proverbial CEO. KPCB has been looking for a digital media partner for months now, as I reported earlier.

Meeker, now 51, was born in Portland, Ind., and went to school at DePauw University in Greencastle, Ind.. She joined Merrill Lynch in Chicago, went to Cornell for her MBA, and in 1986 joined Salomon Brothers and later worked for Cowen & Company. By 1991, she was at Morgan Stanley and worked on PC stocks. Then came the Internet, and she became the “Woman in the Bubble” as The New Yorker famously put it.

Meeker, who is abrasive and charming in equal parts, depending on your station in life, has one thing going for her: She’s a true Internet believer. She wasn’t afraid to call the bull: She predicted that at least 70 percent of the Internet companies would go bust or end up trading below their IPO price. She was right. Meeker also championed eBay even when her firm didn’t get the business, and she rightfully saw the big potential of Google early on.

Lately, she has been championing the mobile web, and she’s right. As my readers well know, I’ve been calling for the shift to mobile for past six years. Regardless, in hiring Meeker, KPCB has made another big publicity splash, just as it did with the launch of its iFund for iPhone-oriented startups and more recently, the sFund for social web-focussed companies.

These funds help the firm put on carefully staged marketing events to attract entrepreneur attention and potentially return to relevance. For a while, KPCB has focused all its efforts on cleantech investments, but now (from the outside at least) seems to have decided to refocus its energies on the Internet.

Despite having successful exits such as Ngmoco ($400 million) and chest thumping by more vocal partners such as Bing Gordon, the firm is perceived to be part of the old Silicon Valley and not part of the new Valley, which is represented by angel investors such as Dave McClure, Keith Rabois and Chris Dixon.

In Meeker, the firm gets a workaholic who has dedicated pretty much all of her life to the Internet. That means she’s going to meet a lot more companies, which gives her an opportunity to meet the next black swan, and possibly score a big hit. Of course, one can’t ignore the fact that unless you’re incredibly lucky, it takes about six years to develop the kind of nose for investments that makes you, say, Michael Moritz. So Meeker clearly has a long slog ahead of her.

The big challenge for Meeker will be to endear herself with the early-stage digital media companies run by twenty-somethings, who have little or no institutional knowledge about her. Having spent her whole life as an analyst, she also has the challenge of being a non-operating person, and these days, startups demand more than just money.

Perhaps the best thing for KPCB would be to unleash her on its growth fund; it’s where she can add instant value and perhaps instant returns. Nevertheless, I’m glad to see her join the venture capital world. Now comes the hard part.

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@CNN  @NYT  @SYN  @TheStreet  NYT_Company_News  NYT_Internet  Om's_Posts  Bing_Gordon  John_Doerr  Kleiner_Perkins_Caufield_&_Byers  Mary_Meeker  from google
november 2010 by bmann
GOGII Raises $8.2 Million Series B For Free iPhone Texting
GOGII, the company behind the popular iPhone applicaiton textPlus, announced today that they have raised an $8.2 million Series B led by Matrix Partners, with existing investor Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers also participating in the round.

GOGII was one of the first companies to get funded by the iFund initiative, which is a venture capital partnership between Apple and Kleiner Perkins. Matrix Partners General Partner Dana Stalder is taking a board seat with this round of funding. Stalder is the former Chief Technology Officer & SVP of Product & Marketing of PayPal.

Since launching the textPlus in June 2009, GOGII has become a crowd favorite in the iPhone community, making texting messaging free to anywhere in the world, using a textPlus username.

According to GOGII, the textPlus app has been downloaded almost 3 million times, reaching over 9 million people, with over 300 million messages sent using the service since June.

CrunchBase Information

GOGII

Matrix Partners

Information provided by CrunchBase

Crunch Network: CrunchBase the free database of technology companies, people, and investors
Company_&_Product_Profiles  GOGII  iFund  kleiner_perkins_caufield_&_byers  matrix_partners  textPlus  from google
december 2009 by taglia
Ramping Up: Mary Meeker’s Latest Mobile Trend Slides
View this document on Scribd
Today, Kleiner Perkins partners Mary Meeker (the former Internet analyst-turned-venture-capitalist) and Matt Murphy are giving a presentation at Google’s thinkmobile conference for its biggest 200 advertisers. The complete slideshow is above, and it goes through ten mobile trends Kleiner is following and investing in. Meeker’s slideshows are always insightful, and she’s been focusing on mobile the past few years.

But in particular the first three slides are real eye-openers. The first one shows the acceleration of mobile device adoption from the iPod to the iPad. In the first three quarters after the introduction of the iPod, 236,000 units were shipped. When the iPhone came out, it hit 3.7 million units shipped in its third quarter, but then the iPad blew both of its predecessors out of the water with 14.8 million devices shipped.

This second slide shows why iTunes needs to be renamed to simply the App Store. There have been 10 billion apps downloaded from iTunes versus only about 624 million songs. ‘Nuff said.

Finally, Android is no slouch either. More than 70 million Android phones have been shipped so far, with Android now outpacing iPhone shipments. And in the fourth quarter, overall shipments of smartphones and tablets surpassed PC shipments for the first time. Global mobile data traffic is projected to grow 26 times over the next five years. Welcome to the new era.

CrunchBase InformationMary MeekerMatt MurphyKleiner Perkins Caufield & ByersInformation provided by CrunchBase
Company_&_Product_Profiles  Mobile  kleiner_perkins_caufield_&_byers  Mary_meeker  Matt_Murphy  slides  from google
november -1 by doughamlin

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