junot-diaz   18

Diaz/Machado Q and A (Minute 33) by AChung | Free Listening on SoundCloud
University of Iowa Q and A 2012 with Junot Diaz. Writer Carmen Maria Machado publicly claimed that during this exchange Diaz “became freshly enraged” every time she asked a question; that his “progressivism/geniality fell away”; and that she got "a blast of misogynist rage and public humiliation." This is the official University-recorded audio of that exchange, beginning at minute 33:00. Machado's claims seem to be SEVERELY REFUTED by audio. Listen for yourself, and be the judge. The truth matters.

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junot-diaz  me-too 
july 2018 by StJohnBosco
Opinion | This Is Not Just About Junot Díaz - The New York Times
This debate is not just about Junot Díaz and the women he has mistreated; it is also about the #MeToo movement as a whole — how its aims are articulated, how it constructs a new imaginary of liberation, both social and sexual. And as others have been saying, this imaginary must include a future in which we can become a better community that talks openly, listens and learns from one another, even when it involves pain that comes without a trigger warning.

The Latina feminist philosopher Maria Lugones has asked in her work how our anger can become both backward- and forward-looking, not only redressing past wrongs but serving our visions for the future. Her work is a master class on conflicts that involve what she calls “non-dominant differences” — conflicts among the oppressed — and she argues strongly against sidelining some forms of oppression in favor of others. But she is clear that this is no easy task; every community contains multiple forms of oppression. This can create “barriers across sense,” as she puts it, that distort how we see one another and disable our ability to understand.

Sexist behavior, whether slight or severe, is never acceptable or excusable. Nobody, today, can claim ignorance. Sexism in every form weakens liberatory movements, fractures solidarity and exacerbates the oppression of the already oppressed. Even verbal offenses, like sexist comments, can instigate shame, humiliation and feelings of unworthiness, and in some cases, post-traumatic stress episodes, nightmares and self-harm.

But sexist behavior is sometimes enacted by individuals who are making otherwise important contributions to the movement, even contributions against the oppression of women. Unrepentant and repeated sexist behavior warrants condemnation and exclusion. Repentant sexists, though, should elicit a different response. Mr. Díaz has said publicly that he accepts responsibility for his behavior. Of course there is always the question of sincerity, but this is best judged by practice in the long term.
me-too  junot-diaz  media  social-media  feminism  academia 
july 2018 by StJohnBosco
In The Wake Of His Damage - The Rumpus.net
A girlfriend of mine, a fellow graduate student in another program, shared that he told her how he is deeply attracted to strong women of color, and inevitably, he finds the crack in them and breaks them before taking off. It is his way of teaching them a lesson, a gift he leaves behind for them in resilience. It is sort of like a continual experiment for him—she tells me this in the hope that I will wake up and get out. I did not. Even though I never ran towards him, I never did fully run away. My ambiguity is my fault. The question remains, why is his behavior sanctioned? Why is it cool, acceptable, or revolutionary? Why seek out an embattled people who already suffer the depredations of patriarchy, racism, sexism, nationalisms, fundamentalism, and other such systems of inequality, specifically, seek them out to destroy them? Why is this narrative so attractive that—for a lover whom he barely acknowledges in a footnote and yet, follows up with for twenty-odd years—it is repeated as if choreographed? As Kamala Das once decried to her critics and well-wishers, I say, “Why not leave me alone?”
feminism  abuse  women  junot-diaz  relationships  trauma  people-of-color  india 
july 2018 by StJohnBosco
Open Letter Against Media Treatment of Junot Díaz – Letters - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education
We envision a #MeToo movement that doesn’t become another form of monitoring women and their choices — which may include questioning the toxic environment normalized by the platform’s communicational dynamics. When critical voices are held back for fear of social-media shaming, or the possibility of repercussions in our professional or social environments, we are caught within another form of violence that has affected women for centuries: silencing. The issue at hand is not whether or not one believes Díaz, or his accusers, but whether one approves the use of media to violently make a spectacle out of a single person while at the same time cancelling out the possibility of disagreement about the facts at hand, or erasing a sustained attention to how the violence of racial hatred, structural poverty, and histories of colonialism extend into the most intimate spaces.
junot-diaz  me-too  academics  shame  social-media  internet  ally-bashing  feminism 
july 2018 by StJohnBosco
Rift among scholars over treatment of Junot Díaz as he faces harassment and misconduct allegations
One of the letter’s signatories, Linda Martín Alcoff, a professor of philosophy at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, followed up with an op-ed in The New York Times distinguishing between repentant and unrepentant misogynists, and situating individual perpetrators within larger political systems.

“Clearly, we need to go beyond easy binaries,” Alcoff wrote. “The letter I signed calls on all of us to think through the important issue of how to demand individual responsibility from abusers while also being vigilant about our collective and institutional responsibility, to develop critiques of the conventions of sexual behavior that produce systemic sexual abuse. While individuals can never be absolved of responsibility by blaming structural conditions, those conditions do create opportunities, excuses, even training in the ways of domination, and these have to be radically transformed.”

Sexist behavior, whether slight or severe, “is never acceptable or excusable,” she added. “But sexist behavior is sometimes enacted by individuals who are making otherwise important contributions to the [liberation] movement, even contributions against the oppression of women.”

These pieces do not call out Díaz’s accusers, but rather the conversations surrounding their accusations -- including immediate calls to boycott Díaz and attempts to intimidate on social media or otherwise “silence” those who might defend him.
junot-diaz  me-too  academics  feminism  ally-bashing 
july 2018 by StJohnBosco
Junot Díaz case may be a #MeToo turning point - The Boston Globe
So far, Díaz has been spared, largely because the deluge of #MeToo stories his accusers predicted hasn’t come. Also, some of the allegations have withered under scrutiny: An exchange recalled by one woman as “a blast of misogynist rage and public humiliation” sounded, to others, like an author being defensive about his work. And Clemmons, who accused Díaz of forcibly kissing her in a stairwell, has refused to say whether it was on the lips.

While Díaz’s allies have decried the rush to judge him, his accusers view the esteemed author as the misogynist who got away. They stand by their allegations, saying a broad array of behaviors should be addressed as part of the #MeToo movement.

“Unfortunately, with #MeToo, the standard seems to be, ‘Well, it’s not as bad as Harvey Weinstein, so therefore it’s not something we should do anything about,’ ” said Alisa Rivera, a Los Angeles woman who wrote about an encounter with Díaz that left her in tears. “I think we should have a bigger conversation about abuse of power.”

So does Sarah J. Jackson, a Northeastern University associate professor of communications who studies hashtag activism online. Though she says every #MeToo story deserves to be heard, she thinks this episode may prove to be a turning point in how they are evaluated.

“Possibly what we’re seeing is we are capable as a society — our institutions, our universities are capable — of differentiating between types of bad behavior,” said Jackson. “Which doesn’t mean there are no consequences of bad behavior. There’s still reputational damage.”
junot-diaz  me-too  ally-bashing 
july 2018 by StJohnBosco
Junot Diaz and consent: is it really that simple?
It is only through privileging rather than pathologising the voices of survivors that we can expand our understanding of rape and move forward.
The problem was that my exemplar had now been exposed as a sex pest. Should I chop him? How could he stand for the general principle that we need to accord survivors authority when he had failed to account for the harm he had done to these women? Why did women bear the burden of publicly raising private harm, when he had had so much opportunity to do so? Could I say that he wrote cogently about rape when he had failed to imagine the harm he inflicted upon his victims with the same sensitivity he had afforded himself?
Upon further reflection I decided to leave Diaz in because it is in its complexity, rather than its vigilantism (on both sides) that the #metoo campaign is at its strongest. And one of the first complicating issues to arise with Diaz was our definition of what it means to be a victim.
Consider Roxane Gay’s charge that Diaz’s New Yorker essay was in fact just a "pre-emptive move aimed at garnering sympathy when accusations come to light."
What struck me as odd in this statement is its refusal to afford Diaz presumptive credibility, something feminists have long argued for behalf of survivors. In order to have a #metoo campaign we need to create social conditions where survivors feel like they will be believed.
junot-diaz  rape  rape-culture  me-too  sexual-assault  abuse  literature  writers  allies 
may 2018 by StJohnBosco
Junot Díaz was an awful man. Who is he now?
These are bigger questions than they may seem at first, because we know who we want women to be in the #metoo era: brave, candid, comforted, confident, empathetic, heard, persistent, seen, trusted. But what of the men? What do we want men in the #metoo reckoning to be, besides apologetic and broken and punished -- do we even know? Don't we want them to be better? In Díaz we have a man who is working out his betterment in public, assuredly as a template for other wounded and hurtful men -- especially immigrant men, English-as-a-second-language men, men of color, and other literary men who are protected by the safeguards of their white privilege.
Díaz surely knows his trauma can explain his actions without excusing them. He also knows the savage skepticism directed towards misogynists in the process of becoming reformed. "Do men receive societal power because of misogyny? Absolutely," argued Teresa Jusino on feminist blog The Mary Sue. "But they lose their right to vulnerability in the process."
junot-diaz  rape  rape-culture  me-too  sexual-assault  abuse  literature  writers  allies 
may 2018 by StJohnBosco
Junot Díaz did a Q&A at the grad program I'd just graduated from. When I made the mistake of asking him a question about his protagonist's unhealthy, pathological relationship with women, he went off for me for twenty minutes.
Celeste Ng

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@pronounced_ing
May 4
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Replying to @carmenmmachado
I’m so sorry this happened, and I’m so sorry no one stood up for you. Thank you for speaking about it.

1 reply 2 retweets 336 likes
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𝔟𝔢𝔫 𝔭𝔣𝔢𝔦𝔣𝔣𝔢𝔯 🌎

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@bppfeiffer
May 4
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I'm sorry this happened to you Carmen. It should not have. Full stop.

2 replies 1 retweet 43 likes
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musu thee stallion


@killamusu
May 4
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Ben are you serious? Celeste’s comment was completely reasonable and did not need any extra commentary.

1 reply 1 retweet 45 likes
Reply 1 Retweet 1 Like 45

𝔟𝔢𝔫 𝔭𝔣𝔢𝔦𝔣𝔣𝔢𝔯 🌎

Verified account

@bppfeiffer
May 4
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I'm not attempting to add an “extra commentary”; I just wanted to be supportive of @carmenmmachado and echo the sentiment that people deserve to be treated with respect. That's it. I wasn't responding to @pronounced_ing; I was responding to Carmen's original tweet.

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musu thee stallion


@killamusu
May 4
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Okay, I see. I appreciate the clarification.
junot-diaz  me-too  sexual-assault  abuse  misogyny 
may 2018 by StJohnBosco

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