judgement   496

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Stephen Sedley reviews ‘The Trial of the Kaiser’ by William A. Schabas · LRB 11 October 2018
The real story is the germination and the eventual flowering of the idea of a permanent international criminal court empowered to try and punish leaders and heads of state for defined offences: wars of aggression, genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. We are not there yet – Russia, the US, Sudan and Israel do not accept the ICC’s jurisdiction – but it was in the turmoil of 1919 in Paris that, almost blindly, a start was made.
war  law  trial  judgement  elite 
yesterday by soobrosa
Jim Horning - Wikiquote
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement
quote  jim  horning  experience  judgement 
10 weeks ago by yencarnacion
Twitter
“We are approaching a tipping point. For the first time ever systems are replacing human in actual c…
AI  judgement  from twitter
august 2018 by phil_hendrix
A Delicate Solution To The Pains And Sorrows Of Your Life - Siddha Performance
...

There will come a day in the future that isn’t as distant as your mind tells you it is. A day will certainly come when you and I are no longer here. And though a select few humans in the world will cry that we are gone, they will once again return to their lives. The buses and the trains will continue to run. The stores will open at the same time they always have.

...

And on that day that you die, if you are lucky you will have a moment or two to look back upon the number of hours and days and years that you were allotted. And when you do, what will you feel? What will you have to say about it?

I’m not interested in what others will say about you when you are dead.

...

In the end, life is more verb than noun.

...
problem  joy  pain  sorrow  pleasure  life  siddha  performance  kapil  gupta  cheer  death  theend  end  clever  judgement  gentle  smile  fix  fixing  cheering  understand  anger  000  000000  000000000  0 
july 2018 by bekishore
Children, Learning, and the Evaluative Gaze of School — Carol Black
"That's when I understood: when you watch a child who is focused on learning, and you let them know you’re watching, and you let them know your opinion as though your opinion matters, you just took that thing away from them. You just made it yours. Your smell is all over it now.

The evaluative gaze does the greatest harm, of course, to the kids who live under a biased eye; the ones who enter school with a test score or a disciplinary record or a skin color that shades the gaze against them. Once an assessment of a child's ability has been made, positive or negative, that child will feel it; if you think you can conceal it from them, you're wrong. They know. They always know. Studies have shown that even lab rats learn more slowly if their researchers believe that they aren't smart rats. The kids who grow up under a negative gaze, the ones who day after day, year after year, feel themselves appraised and found wanting –– these kids pay the greatest price, their psyches permanently damaged by it, their futures irrevocably harmed. (The fact that our appraisals are shown again and again to be wrong never seems to discourage us from making them.) But even the kids who get the good grades, the high scores, the perfect "10's" –– even they are subtly blighted by it. They've won the prize, and lost their power.

Why is it clear to us that it's degrading and objectifying to measure and rank a girl’s physical body on a numeric scale, but we think it’s perfectly okay to measure and rank her mind that way?

Over the years I've watched the many ways that children try to cope with the evaluative gaze of school. (The gaze, of course, can come from parents, too; just ask my kids.) Some children eagerly display themselves for it; some try to make themselves invisible to it. They fight, they flee, they freeze; like prey animals they let their bodies go limp and passive before it. Some defy it by laughing in its face, by acting up, clowning around, refusing to attend or engage, refusing to try so you can never say they failed. Some master the art of holding back that last 10%, of giving just enough of themselves to "succeed," but holding back enough that the gaze can't define them (they don't yet know that this strategy will define and limit their lives.) Some make themselves sick trying to meet or exceed the "standards" that it sets for them. Some simply vanish into those standards until they don't know who they would have been had the standards not been set.

But the power of the gaze goes beyond the numbers and letters used to quantify it. It exists in looks and tones and body language, in words and in the spaces between words. It is a way of looking at another human being, of confronting another human life; it is a philosophical stance, an emotional stance, a political stance, an exercise of power. As philosopher Martin Buber might have put it, the stance of true relationship says to the other, "I–Thou;" the evaluative gaze says "I–It." It says, "I am the subject; you are the object. I know what you are, I know what you should be, I know what 'standards' you must meet." It is a god-like stance, which is actually a big deal even if you think you are a fair and friendly god.

The evaluative gaze of school is so constant a presence, so all-pervasive an eye, that many people have come to believe that children would actually not grow and develop without it. They believe that without their "feedback," without their constant "assessment," a child's development would literally slow or even stop. They believe that children would not learn from the things they experience and do and see and hear and make and read and imagine unless they have an adult to "assess" them (or unless the adult teaches them to "self-assess," which generally means teaching them to internalize the adult gaze.) For people whose experience is with children inside the school system, it may seem self-evident that this is true. For people whose experience is with children outside the school system, it may seem like believing that an acorn would not grow into an oak tree unless you measure it and give it your opinion. Because an oak tree does not actually require your opinion, and believe it or not, 90% of the time, neither does a child.

A pot boils whether you watch it or not. It just needs water and fire.

There are ever-increasing numbers of people raising their kids outside this Panopticon of constant evaluation and measurement and feedback, and what they find is simply this: they grow and develop very much like other kids. Like other kids, they don't all conform to the same "standards;" like other kids, they are individual and diverse. Like other kids, they have triumphs, and struggles, and doldrums, and passions, and frustrations, and joys. "Assessment," or the lack of it, seems to have remarkably little to do with it. Because what an oak tree actually needs is not your opinion but soil and water and light and air, and what a child needs is love and stories and tools and conversation and support and guidance and access to nature and culture and the world. If a kid asks for your feedback, by all means you can give it; it would be impolite not to. But what we should be measuring and comparing is not our children but the quality of the learning environments we provide for them. "
carolblack  canon  unschooling  deschooling  evaluation  assessment  schools  schooling  schooliness  cv  petergray  judgement  writing  art  sfsh  rubrics  children  childhood  learning  howwelearn  education  discipline  coercion  rabindranathtagore  panopticon  observation  teaching  teachers  power  resistance  surveillance  martinbuber  gender  race  racism  measurement  comparison  praise  rewards  grades  grading  2018 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Twitter
“It’s that defeats us.”

Good night, - maybe tomorrow y’all will finally wise-up and listen to…
judgement  peasants-  from twitter_favs
march 2018 by toddc
Why Norway Is So Good at the 2018 Winter Olympics | Time
"But a distinctly Norweigan rule for their youth sports may strike a particular chord with many Americans. (This one included: I’m a youth sports parent, and wrote a TIME cover story on the booming kid sports industry last summer).

Ovrebo says that in Norway, organized youth sports teams cannot keep score until they are 13. “We want to leave the kids alone,” says Ovrebo. “We want them to play. We want them to develop, and be focused on social skills. They learn a lot from sports. They learn a lot from playing. They learn a lot from not being anxious. They learn a lot from not being counted. They learn a lot from not being judged. And they feel better. And they tend to stay on for longer.”"
norway  sports  play  games  winterolympics  olympics  2018  children  youth  judgement  competition  confidence  anxiety 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Review of The Tyranny of Metrics by Jerry Muller
Muller shows that metrics are often used as a substitute for relevant experience, by managers with generic rather than specific expertise.

If a group of doctors collect and analyze data on clinical outcomes, they are likely to learn something together. If bonuses and promotions are tied to the numbers, the exercise will teach nobody anything and may end up killing patients.

It makes the case for professional autonomy: that metrics should be tools in the hands of teachers, doctors and soldiers rather than tools in the hands of those who would oversee them.

Measurement is not an alternative to judgement: measurement demands judgement: judgement about whether to measure, what to measure, how to evaluate the significance of what’s been measured, whether rewards and penalties will be attached to the results, and to whom to make the measurements available.
metrics  judgement  measurement 
february 2018 by drmeme
Free Yourself of Your Harshest Critic, and Plow Ahead - The New York Times
You’re too close to your work to be a decent judge of it. So cut the paralyzing self-criticism and instead pour that energy into doing what you do.
bias  work  criticism  judgement  perception 
october 2017 by vloux
George W. Bush’s anti-Trump manifesto, annotated - The Washington Post
"Too often, we judge other groups by their worst examples while judging ourselves by our best intentions – forgetting the image of God we should see in each other."

Deep truth bombs from George Dubya
Speeches  President  Leadership  Judgement  Sense  Arguments  Discourse  Disagreement 
october 2017 by JB4GDI

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