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Amazon Alexa for Hospitality: The Smart Hotel of The Future Is Here
Amazon has announced a new version of its Echo smart home assistant, Alexa for Hospitality, targetted at hotels and businesses in the hospitality industry. With features on board specifically intended for businesses in the hospitality sector, Alexa for Hospitality pushes the envelope for posibilities in service standards in the industry. For guests who have Alexa...

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Amazon  Alexa  for  Hospitality:  The  Smart  Hotel  of  Future  Is  Here 
1 hour ago by vrzone
Oppo's Find X Is Yet Another Bezelless Masterpiece
Just a week after the Vivo Nex was announced, Oppo’s Find X has been announced. As yet another fully bezel-less smartphone, they both take after the vision first set out in Vivo’s Apex concept phone. Boasting a 92.25% screen-to-body ratio, the Oppo Find X snuff’s out the Vivo Nex’s short-lived world-best 91.24% candle. Of course, all...

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Oppo’s  Find  X  Is  Yet  Another  Bezelless  Masterpiece 
16 hours ago by vrzone
The CMO of HP Inc is calling time on the traditional ad agency model: 'The disruption is real'
There has been much consternation in the ad business about the threat of consulting firms like Accenture, Deloitte, and IBM encroaching on agencies. And these companies are hardly being shy about their ambitions, as each has a noticeable presence on the French Riviera at the Cannes advertising festival.
The consulting threat is significant, according to Antonio Lucio, global chief marketing & communications officer at HP Inc. And traditional ad agencies should be worried.
"The  disruption  is  real_"  he  told  Business  Insider. 
18 hours ago by palfiericmw
My Tamagotchi is everything that went wrong with our future - The Verge
My smartphone, I’ve realized, is also a Tamagotchi. My laptop is a Tamagotchi. My tablet is a Tamagotchi. These new Tamagotchis have nicer screens and more than three buttons, but more importantly, they’re hooked into much more elaborate guilt trips. Now it‘s not just a virtual pet at stake; it’s my friends, my family, and my work being held hostage in order to keep me pressing these stupid buttons.
lmao  tech  culture  futurism  is  whack 
22 hours ago by defundpoppunk
Understanding The Administration’s Monstrous Immigration Policies | Current Affairs
immigration trump dystopia law analysis
Understanding The Administration’s Monstrous Immigration Policies
Regular readers of Current Affairs will know that I usually have a lot to say about immigration. Regular readers of the news generally will know that a lot of bad stuff has happened with immigration over the past week or so. An article was inevitable! Here it is.
I will be taking several recent news items on immigration, putting them into a bit of context, and speculating about what future developments might arise from them. I want to stress, on the one hand, that this has been an especially bad few weeks in immigration policy. It represents, in my opinion, the culmination of a multi-prong strategy to completely choke off asylum-seeking at the border. No physical wall could possibly be more effective than the system the Trump administration is currently setting up, if everything works out according to their plans (though this is not yet a foregone conclusion).
On the other hand, many of the things that people are currently shocked by are not new. Separating mothers from children on a large scale is new. Separating children from fathers, or fathers from families, is not new: that has been going on for ages, and no one has ever given a damn. The heartwrenching, blood-boiling story of the Honduran father who killed himself after his child was ripped from his arms could have happened at any point over the past six years or so.
Important caveat: I am not an expert in immigration law, so what follows are purely my own impressions. I think they are sensible, but they are by no means authoritative. I have not been able to consult at any length with more knowledgeable immigration law folks, because they are all too goddamn busy right now. Technically, I myself am supposed to be studying for the bar exam—memorizing the rules of estate administration and corporations and all those really important areas of law—but I am too busy drinking about the gathering strength of the murderous immigration police state. (Don’t worry, I am doing fine! We all occasionally have those days when it feels as if one’s physical body is but the fragile carapace of a huge and terrible rage.)
WHY IS THE GOVERNMENT SEPARATING FAMILIES AT THE BORDER? IS IT BECAUSE OF A “DEMOCRATIC LAW”?
Recently, Trump has dropped numerous cryptic references to a “Democratic law” that is supposedly forcing his hand on family separations. The other day he tweeted: “The Democrats are forcing the breakup of families at the Border with their horrible and cruel legislative agenda.”
I have no idea what Trump’s referring to there—there is no existing law that requires Trump to separate families. It’s possible he’s just casually spreading disinformation. That said, there are a number of laws and legal holdings that, operating in conjunction, produced a situation on the border that the Trump administration has found extremely frustrating to their plans to reduce border crossings. The only way to get around this was to start separating families. I will explain.
Basically, between the time when the Refugee Act was passed in 1980 (implementing in our domestic law the commitments we agreed to when we signed the 1951 Refugee Convention) and the Clinton years, anybody who came to the U.S. and asked for asylum was entitled to a full hearing of their claim, either at the asylum office or before an immigration judge. Immigration detention was quite rare: it was certainly not a standard feature of the asylum-seeking process. Asylum-seekers had temporary permission to live and work in the U.S. while their cases were pending.
Then, in 1996, Congress passed, and Clinton signed into law, the “Illegal Immigration and Immigrant Responsibility Act,” which (among many other disastrous things) established a procedure known as “expedited removal.” This means that any person who cannot prove continuous presence in the United States for the past two years—including, by definition, all the people who come to our borders and ports of entry—may be snatched by CBP or ICE and summarily deported, without ever going in front of a judge. The only way that an asylum-seeker can stop this from happening is by asserting that they are afraid to go back to their country. At this point, they are entitled to a brief interview with an asylum officer, whom they must convince that they have a substantial likelihood of winning their asylum case. If the asylum officer gives them a “no,” it is nearly impossible to get this decision reversed. Even when lawyers have access to asylum-seekers during this process, which is often not the case, they are very limited in what they can do to help their clients, and are usually engaged in a terrifying race against the clock. I cannot possibly over-emphasize how much expedited removal fucked up our asylum system. (Among the Democratic lawmakers who voted in favor of this bill were Dianne Feinstein, Patrick Leahy, and Harry Reid. Thanks, guys!)
Once the Department of Homeland Security was created and the militarization of the border increased post-9/11, a system of detention centers began to evolve as holding-places for immigrants who were caught at the border and couldn’t be immediately deported under expedited removal because they had raised a claim of fear. Still, however, detention was far from universal: many people who claimed fear at the border were simply given a notice to appear in court and allowed to go free. In the Bush years, a special detention center, Hutto, was built to hold family units—i.e. women with children—who were caught at the border. Early in Obama’s presidency, the center was re-purposed as an adult-only center, presumably because locking up children felt, well, wrong.
Even this fairly pedestrian and uncontroversial moral stand, however, was soon sacrificed to some twisted form of political expediency. Obama presided over a massive expansion of ICE’s budget and operational capacity. In 2013, when Central Americans started appearing at the border in larger numbers than usual, the Obama administration decided that it had a “crisis” on its hands. Rather than, you know, figuring out whether some of the incoming migrants might be refugees, and, say, coordinating with UNHCR to set up reception centers on the border, the government instead decided to build more family detention centers, where mothers and children could be locked up pending their “credible fear interviews” and then rapidly deported.
Unfortunately for the government, some lawyers showed up at these centers eventually, and then the women started passing their credible fear interviews in pretty large numbers, because the women now actually understood what the hell was going on, and it turns out that most of them had real asylum claims. Now, if the women had crossed the border alone, without children, the government would have been within its legal rights to keep them detained until the date of their final court hearing. (Many adult asylum-seekers are detained in this way, over periods of months and months, even when they pose no conceivable danger to the public, and even though there are non-detention options, like ankle monitors, that would make it near-impossible for them to flee.) But since these women crossed with children, things were different. Per a 1997 legal consent decree called the “Flores Settlement,” kids can’t be kept in more restrictive custody than is absolutely necessary, and there are (at least on paper) all kinds of restrictions on the kinds of facilities they can be housed in. In 2015, a federal judge in California made an additional ruling specifying that the Flores Settlement also applied to children who crossed with their mothers, and that if such a child were released from detention, the mother must be released too if their cases were linked. In other words: if a mother could pass her credible fear interview, she and her child were legally required to be released.
Meeting Trump considerably more than halfway, I would say that maybe he is thinking, in some garbled way, of a combination of expedited removal and the Flores Settlement when he speaks of a Democratic “legislative agenda” that is “forcing” family separations. The expedited removal system is indeed the primary reason why family detention has evolved in the way it has: it has been necessary to confine people close to the border so that, if they fail their credible fear interviews, the expedited removal process can resume with all due haste. The whole problem here for the Trump administration is that if a mother passes her interview, her child, per Flores, acts as her ticket out of detention. If the child and the mother are detained together, the mother goes free when the child goes free. The Trump administration does not want to have to let the mothers go. The only way to get around this inconvenience (other than revoking the Flores Settlement, which Republicans have repeatedly tried to do in immigration bills before Congress this year) is by not detaining the mothers and children together. So Trump was “forced” to separate moms and kids, if we understand “forced” in the sense of “it was the only way to accomplish the result I wanted.”
The Trump administration is a cesspit of racists, sadists, and domestic abusers. What they are doing on the border right now is immoral on the scale of, I don’t know, the Trail of Tears? Nazi Germany, in the pre-death camp phase of its career? I don’t intend to diminish Republicans’ culpability for these atrocities one iota by pointing out—as a separate and additional matter—that Democrats have also been deeply complicit in the terrifying developments we are now seeing. Without the expedited removal procedures established under Clinton, and the vast expansion of the immigration detention and deportation apparatus under Obama, none of what the Trump administration is doing now would be possible. Maybe Obama can create a Netflix series about how Democrats normalized the practice … [more]
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yesterday by aniranc
Ultibo.org
Main Page
Welcome to the Ultibo wiki, the place to find detailed information about Ultibo, what it can do and how to use it. This content will be continually expanding as development of Ultibo core progresses, check back regularly to stay up to date with the latest information.
What is Ultibo?
Ultibo core is a full featured environment for embedded or bare metal (without an operating system) development on Raspberry Pi (all models). It is not an operating system itself but provides many of the same services as an OS such as memory management, threading, networking and file systems. Primarily intended to make development of embedded applications as similar as possible to development for other platforms by providing common features and services and eliminating the need to begin from scratch, Ultibo core can be used in many different ways.
You may want to use it simply to develop applications that take advantage of the extensive API to create connected devices, or Internet of Things (IoT), which support common hardware such as USB and standard protocols like IP, TCP and UDP or physical computing via GPIO control. Alternatively you might use it to experiment with operating system design and embedded development, avoiding the need to create everything from scratch and allowing you to focus on trying out ideas and concepts in an environment where the basics are already taken care of.
More advanced users may opt to use Ultibo core as a base for exploring specific ARM technologies such as TrustZone and Hypervisor mode, because you have complete and unrestricted hardware access you can "take over" one or more CPUs for example to use as you require and still allow Ultibo core to provide basic services like network connectivity and logging.
While Ultibo core is not designed as a real time operating system (RTOS) it offers unrestricted access to hardware and allows the option for including real time components without the need to circumvent the OS functionality.
Whichever way you choose to use it, the possibilities are only limited by your imagination.
Getting Started
Based on the powerful open source Free Pascal compiler and the Lazarus integrated development environment (IDE), Ultibo core doesn't require you to gather together components to create a development environment or wrestle with linker script syntax. Everything you need to create and compile working applications is included in the installer download so you can create your first embedded application as easily as starting a new project, adding a few lines of code and compiling.
Getting Started - A simple guide to creating your first embedded application.
Demo Image - See what Ultibo can do by installing and running the demo image, or if you don’t have a Raspberry Pi you can watch a video of the demo on YouTube.
Architecture and Design
Designed as a unikernel or kernel in a run time library (RTL), Ultibo core is much more than just a boot loader or helper library. When you compile even the simplest application the core functionality of threading, memory management, interrupt handling, clock, timers, strings, objects etc is automatically included in your program so before your code is executed a complete environment has been established to support your application. You don't need to know how it works to use Ultibo core but being open source everything is there for you to explore.
Architecture - Detailed information about the internal workings of Ultibo core.
Developing with Ultibo
With support for almost all of the Free Pascal RTL functionality including memory, strings, classes, objects, files, threads, sockets, exceptions and unicode, most of the information and examples in the Free Pascal documentation can be used directly with little or no change. Ultibo core also includes additional APIs that allow direct access to core functionality and support for specific hardware and protocols.
Unit Reference - Complete API reference for all Ultibo core units.
Environment Variables - Details of all environment variables that can be passed on the command line.
Even though the installer download provides everything needed to get started, some may want to build the Ultibo RTL, or even FPC and Lazarus from sources in order to customize the way things work. If you're a Linux or Mac user, we don't currently provide a package that includes our modifications to FPC or Lazarus however you should be able to build your own using our build instructions as a starting point.
Building from Source - How to rebuild the RTL, FPC or Lazarus from source on Windows.
Building for Debian - Building FPC and the RTL for Debian Linux.
Building for Raspbian - Building FPC and the RTL for Raspbian Linux.
Building for Mac - Building FPC and the RTL for Mac OSX.
Supporting the Ultibo Project
Like any open source project there are many ways you can help and support, it could be as simple as telling others about it, sharing your projects, contributing some code or writing some documentation. You can even choose to directly sponsor a feature if you prefer. Whatever you might decide to do, the goal is always to create an environment where everyone can experience the excitement of creating something from their own imagination. For more details see Supporting Ultibo.
Current Status
Ultibo core is a work in progress (all software is) so not every feature is supported or fully implemented yet. The support for both features and hardware will continue to grow with each release with new support added based on need. Priority is always given to developing those things that have the most benefit and on ensuring that both performance and stability are continually improved.
Current Status - The status of support for features and functionality as at the current version.
Supported Hardware - Detailed information on what hardware is currently supported and ready to use.
Bug Tracking - Information about currently known and reported bugs.
Useful Resources
In spite of the revolution in information provided by the internet, sources of information are still scattered widely and can often be difficult to find unless you search for exactly the right words. We're gathering an ever growing list of resources related to all aspects of developing embedded devices so if you find something good let us know and we'll add it so that others can benefit.
Useful Resources - A collection of the best information we can find on everything related to Ultibo core.
Video Tutorials - Our video tutorial collection including the Discovering Ultibo series.
License
Ultibo  core  is  licensed  under  the  GNU  Lesser  General  Public  License  v2.1  and  is  freely  available  to  use_  modify  and  distribute  within  the  terms  of  the  license.  includes  an  exception  statement  to  permit  static  linking  with  files  that  are  licensed  under  different  terms.  from iphone
5 days ago by kgiverson

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