inventories   33

CABINET // Inventory / The Bible: 2,728 Objects in Order of Appearance
"This list catalogues every individual object in the Bible in the order in which it appears. I defined an object as anything inanimate that can be moved. Animal carcasses or parts of the human body were included but I also included eggs and seeds, considering the status of these as objects to be more relevant for my purposes than the fact that they are in some sense animate. No given object is mentioned more than once, even if it is subsequently referred to in the text because it is still the same object. The list does, however, include multiple instances of the same type of object. For example, “Asherah pole” appears seven times in the list, since it is 
clear that these are all individual Asherah poles rather than repeated references to the same object. Hypothetical objects, such as those described in the visions of the prophets, are not included. The object is listed with its material properties, color, and dimensions where they are given."
via:doingitwrong  objects  bible  inventories  inventory  emmakay  2004  lists 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Symbiota
In this quickly changing world, there has developed a great necessity to learn about our world-wide biota at an increased rate. Scientists are predicting that future species declines will approach historical mass extinction levels within this century. We need to develop better tools to aid taxonomists, field biologists, and environmental educators. It is imperative that we increase our rate of conducting biological inventories, especially within the tropics, as well as steering youth toward becoming our future scientists. Symbiota web tools strive to integrate biological community knowledge and data in order to synthesize a network of databases and tools that will aid in increasing our overall environmental comprehension.
collaborations  inventories  tropics  floras  faunas  databases  data  taxonomy  geography  community  biodiversity 
february 2016 by derishus
Web Retailers, Now With Stores, Teach New Tricks - WSJ
By SUZANNE KAPNER
Aug. 11, 2015 | WSJ

Retailers have been stealing ideas from online rivals about how to run websites for years. Now they are borrowing ways to run brick-and-mortar stores.

In Manhattan Beach, Calif., Macy’s Inc. revamped its swimsuit and workout sections this spring to display only samples, a strategy used by online retailers that have opened physical stores.

Instead of stuffing racks with every size and style in these departments, Macy’s displayed only one item of each style. Shoppers used an app on their mobile phones to alert Macy’s sales staff of the style and size they wanted to try on and that item was sent to a specified dressing room.

By not putting all the sizes on the sales floor, Macy’s was able to display more styles and avoid the tangle of hangers. Shoppers didn’t have to go back and forth into the fitting rooms to find the right size. The effort sought to marry the ease of online with something the Internet can’t offer—the ability to see, touch and try on goods.
retailers  apparel  e-commerce  inventories  Macy’s  bricks-and-mortar  mobile_applications  mobile_phones  experiential_marketing 
august 2015 by jerryking
Intimate Spaces: The Archaeology of Pockets | Archaeology and Material Culture
"Few spaces could be more familiar yet more unremarked upon than pockets. Clothing pockets are a presence of sorts, but like edges of an excavation unit their material definition may be made by their tangible boundaries and the things in them rather than the vacuum that is perhaps the actual pocket. Pockets are distinctively intimate since they are stitched into our public garments yet conceal our bodies, and they hold a narrow range of small things like coins, keys, wallets, phones, makeup, lighters, and similar objects that for various reasons are held close to our bodies and accessible to our hands. There are some idiosyncratic but illuminating insights into privacy, place, and self that can be made based on an “excavation” of pockets and the cargo that finds refuge in them.

Maybe our use of some pockets is largely functional, like a right-hander who habitually slides their key chain into their readily accessible right front pants pocket. Yet many pocket use patterns are the complicated result of longstanding practices and the vagaries of fashion. For instance, men’s back pants pockets often betray “billfold bulge,” which is even worse in the face of contour-hugging skinny jeans and similar cuts. In 1977, the Palm Beach Post assessed increasingly lean European pants cuts and pocket-less pants and recognized pocket use was a force of habit, concluding that “most men just don’t feel comfortable unless everything is in the same place its been for years.” Thirty years later Details advised that there “is absolutely no need for you to shove an engorged wallet in the pocket of your $400 jeans.” They concluded that “the contemporary pocket-stuffer is one of three things: an oblivious creature of habit, a man too insecure to carry a shoulder bag, or someone lacking the organizational skills to pare down the clutter that sits like a benign tumor on his right cheek to a couple of $100 bills and an AmEx.”

Much of pocket use is rooted in ideological notions of gender, class, and sexuality, historical fashion styles, and unexamined pocket use habits. Since the late 19th century masculinity ideologies and fashion have cast pockets as somehow distinctively “masculine” reserves. In the 18th century women’s garments included concealed pockets, with expansive tie pockets under dresses and petticoats in use for roughly two centuries. Garments began to include far fewer pockets in the late 19th century as dresses and coats became more streamlined and the handbag became the carry-all of choice for women. In 1899 a New York Times commentator noted the gradual disappearance of women’s garment pockets and remembered that “our grandmothers . . . used to have big, deep pockets in their skirts which they could get at somehow and in which they usually carried the household keys, a ball of yarn with knitting needles stuck in it, a little smooth-worn gourd for darning operations, and very often a few doughnuts or cookies and apples and a pair of spectacles.”

[via: http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2015/02/pockets.html ]
pockets  archaeology  everyday  carrying  inventories  2015  handbags  backpacks  contents  objects  history  anthropology  abrahamlincoln  clothing  wearables  wearable  gender  georgelegrady  jasontravis  erintaylor  lindaalstead  rafaellozano-hemmer  francoisrobert  hannahsmithallen  meredithbrickell 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Blessedly Unnecessary | Books and Culture
"Gregory Blackstock is autistic, and because of his extraordinary gifts he is called a "savant" (a problematic word, I feel). Like many autistic people, Blackstock has a passion for order and precision, which shows up in any number of ways. For instance, the autobiography he hand–wrote for his book, Blackstock's Collections, takes the form of a list—"1. MY DATE OF BIRTH … 2. MY PREVIOUS SCHOOLS OF 1950 TO 1964 … 3. MY USUAL CITY NEWSPAPER ROUTE PERIOD"—and in listing his employment history he notes that he began his job at the Washington Athletic Club on September 9, 1975 and retired on January 12, 2001. Though I said that Blackstock worked there for twenty–five years, he prefers to say that it was twenty–five–and–a–third years.

This precision is central to Blackstock's art as well—though I have no idea whether it affects his accordion playing. The book is called Blackstock's Collections because each drawing is just that, a collection of things belonging to a particular category. I find especially intriguing Blackstock's tendency to give his drawings titles that begin with the definite article: "The Knives", "The Dentist's Tools, "The Memorable Vermont Scenes"—as though he aspires to utter completeness, gathering every member of a given set on a single page."



"Most of the "collections" are perfectly comprehensible, even if we suspect that it's not really possible to get all of "The Knives" on one page (Blackstock manages fifty–one of them, a considerable achievement). But Blackstock's passion for taxonomy gets him into some curious corners. Smack in the middle of "The Bells," among cowbells and bicycle bells and doorbells and the Liberty Bell and the bell of Big Ben, there's a diving bell. Not the same kind of thing, you say? But it's a bell, isn't it? I wonder how Blackstock would respond if someone were to point out to him that in his drawing of "The Drums" he omits the eardrum.

One of the few really heterogeneous collections is "The Noisemakers," a highly colorful and (for Blackstock) rather large drawing, forty–four inches tall, which includes not only whistling skyrockets and M–80 firecrackers and chainsaws, but also "thunder–&–rainstorms" and a scowling face accompanied by a speech balloon containing an unusually symmetrical set of signs indicating unprintable words: "##**@@**##!!!" This noisemaker is labeled as "LOUD FILTHY–MOUTH OFFENDER, THE OVEREMOTIONAL DIRTBAG!""



"As Auden also notes, art has now lost that habit of usefulness and does not seem likely to get it back: when we try to unite the useful and the beautiful, he says, we "fail utterly." Though there are some recent developments in industrial design that give one hope, I think Auden is basically correct. It's difficult to imagine a new Piranesi, or an Audubon for the 21st century. We have turned over the task of documenting the world to the various cameras, and for good reason: they perform the task well. But I hope we may occasionally find more Gregory Blackstocks, artists who—unaware that their labors of documentary love are unnecessary—plunge ahead and do their work, thereby reminding us what it means to look, really to look, at the Creation."

[See also: http://blog.ayjay.org/uncategorized/collections/ ]
gregoryblackstock  alanjacobs  art  whauden  2007  katebingamanburt  cataloging  taxonomy  sorting  classification  drawing  drawings  inventory  inventories 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Walmart Strains to Keep Grocery Aisles Stocked - NYTimes.com
By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
Published: April 3, 2013

Walmart, the nation’s largest retailer and grocer, has cut so many employees that it no longer has enough workers to stock its shelves properly, according to some employees and industry analysts. Internal notes from a March meeting of top Walmart managers show the company grappling with low customer confidence in its produce and poor quality. “Lose Trust,” reads one note, “Don’t have items they are looking for — can’t find it.”...The retailer’s customers have complained about the quality and freshness in the produce aisle....Walmart charged into the grocery market about two decades ago, realizing that frequent trips by grocery shoppers could help improve traffic. Grocery made up 55 percent of Walmart United States sales in 2012, which was flat from the previous year. The company’s grocery prices are usually about 15 percent below competitors’, according to Supermarket News. ... Safeway customers are 71 percent confident in its fresh produce, the notes said, while Walmart customers are 48 percent confident in Walmart’s produce. In the interview, Mr. Sinclair of Walmart said he did not know where that data came from, but that “we believe that we can improve the perception of quality of produce for Walmart customers.”

The notes highlighted some stocking problems: “1 hour out of Refrigeration = 1 day less product life,” they read, adding that Walmart will change shift responsibilities so fresh food is not stocked overnight and goes out at 10 a.m., not 7 a.m. ...The company just introduced an inventory management system for produce departments nationwide that will track how many days an item has been in transit, how much shelf life remains, and what orders the company should place to meet demand. With delicate items like raspberries, “you almost need to know by the hour how long the product has been through our system,” which was hard to track when 42 distribution centers buying from hundreds of different vendors were sending around products,
cold_storage  Wal-Mart  fresh_produce  customer_experience  grocery  supermarkets  staffing  inventories  consumer_confidence  perishables  quality  tracking  shelf_life  merchandising  distribution_centres  refrigeration 
april 2013 by jerryking
Used car dealers getting a Boost
Feb. 08 2007 | The Globe and Mail | GERRY BLACKWELL

Boost Motor Group of Toronto.

Those who don't understand it may themselves be ripe for plucking.

Most people think of Web 2.0, the much-hyped and ill-defined evolution of the World Wide Web, as being characterized by online social interaction sites such as YouTube or MySpace, or collaborations such as wikis and blogs. But a parallel Web 2.0 trend involves software companies using the Internet to build products and offer services that would not be possible, or at least not as effective, using traditional client-server approaches. Boost is an example of the latter.

Boost's service helps dealers manage used-car inventories, allows them to present exhaustive information about each vehicle on their own websites (hosted by Boost), and manage the process of listing vehicles on sites such as eBay, driving.ca and livedeal.ca. Boost employees do all the data capture, including photographing cars, describing and assessing vehicles on the lot, and providing marketing services to help dealers get their vehicles noticed on the Web.
Web_2.0  second_hand  automobile  dealerships  inventories  marketing 
january 2013 by jerryking
A partial inventory of Gustave Flaubert's personal effects
As catalogued by M. Lemoel on May 20, 1880, twelve days after the writer’s death.
Joanna Neborsky, illustrator

Triple Canopy, 8 October 2012
inventories  joanna.neborsky  lists  from delicious
october 2012 by disegno
Leisure revenue management
Oct 2001 | Journal of Leisure Property |Ian Yeoman; Una McMahon-Beattie; and Ros Sutherland.

Leisure revenue management (RM or yield management) marries the issues of supply, demand and price, when the organisation is constrained by capacity. By using time' as the unit of inventory, the authors explore a typology of the characteristics of RM that pertain to the leisure experience, and set out to explain the process of RM through a holistic model which brings benefits to managing leisure properties and events.
ProQuest  yield_management  inventories  revenue_management  operational_research  leisure 
july 2012 by jerryking
What makes Mick Davis stand out -- strong nerves
27 Mar 2007 | The Globe and Mail pg.B.2. | Eric Reguly.

Canadian mining bosses should get out of the office more often...For Canadian (mining CEOs) when the price rises sharply, visions of price collapse immediately fill their heads, and for good reason. The last downward cycle was so brutal that the mining companies were lucky to come out of it alive. They totally misjudged the current cycle, though. The Canadian CEOs should have spent less time on the golf course and more time watching stockpiles of nickel (and copper, zinc and lead) in Shanghai, Mumbai, Taipei and Seoul disappear like beer at Oktoberfest....Xstrata CEO Mick Davis and the intelligence gatherers at Glencore International, the commodities trader that controls 35 per cent of Xstrata, endlessly traipse around the planet to pick up information on reserves and supply and demand. They feed the data into a black box, which rattles and shakes and spits out a range of eye-popping numbers. Then Xstrata runs out and buys nickel companies when nickel prices are outrageously, unsustainably, stupidly high, or so everyone else thinks. Then the company and its shareholders make obscene amounts of money....CVRD and Inco have been spectacularly right, the Canadians spectacularly wrong. The result is a Canadian nickel mining industry with no nickel miners left of any size. Falconbridge, Inco and LionOre have been eradicated as independent, home-grown names. Investors who sold Inco and Falconbridge left fortunes on the table...The Xstrata lads didn't just get smart on price forecasts. They also figured out how to treat the hedge funds: Respect but don't fret about them. The hedgies pump volatility into the system. When commodity prices fall, say, 10 per cent, share prices might fall by double that amount as the hedgies head for the tall grass. As a CEO, you need strong nerves to endure such violent up and down movements. Mr. Davis has strong nerves and it has paid off. Many other mining bosses look at the hedge funds with fear.
CEOs  commodities  commodities_supercycle  Eric_Reguly  Glencore  inventories  lessons_learned  market_intelligence  Mick_Davis  mining  price_forecasts  scuttlebutt  sellout_culture  stockpiles  volatility  Xstrata 
june 2012 by jerryking
Sales Spurt, Growing Pains Leave Karaoke Maker Singing the Blues - WSJ.com
July 29, 2003 | WSJ | By JEFF BAILEY - Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.

Singing Machine Co., a Coconut Creek, Fla., maker of karaoke machines. But rather than celebrating its success, these days the executives at Singing Machine are scrambling to avoid insolvency. The company's experience is a warning to all entrepreneurs about the dangers of rapid growth. Outside auditors last month noted that a default on a borrowing agreement "raises substantial doubt about the company's ability to continue as a going concern."

"It's a classic business-school case of growing pains," says Y.P. Chan, 39 years old and recently named Singing Machine's chief operating officer.

Every year, thousands of smaller companies go belly up because entrepreneurs aren't prepared to manage rapid growth. Accustomed to scratching for every sale, when the throttle is finally thrown wide open, too many assume it is clear sailing and fail to ask some important questions.
[chart]

Are your finances solid enough to support a bigger company, or are you counting on lush profits to do it? If you load up on inventory to satisfy demand, how will you survive if prices plunge? Look around -- does management have experience running a bigger enterprise? Look at your competitors -- are they bigger and likely to weather tough times better? Or are they also small companies that might get overextended and slash prices to stay afloat?
small_business  growth  bankruptcies  warning_signs  insolvency  contingency_planning  hard_times  high-growth  inventories  risk-management  overextended 
may 2012 by jerryking
Lost Libraries | The Public Domain Review
Claire Preston, on Thomas Browne (1605-1682) his Musaeum Clausum, an imagined inventory of ‘remarkable books, antiquities, pictures and rarities of several kinds, scarce or never seen by any man now living’.

"Musaeum Clausum (the hidden library) is a fake catalogue of a collection that contained books, pictures, and artefacts. Such collections (and their elaborate indices) were a common phenomenon from about 1500 to 1700 and after."
thomas.browne  lists  inventories  imaginary 
april 2012 by asfaltics

related tags

&  2002-2008  2004  2007  2015  _wishlist  abrahamlincoln  agriculture  alanjacobs  amazon  ammonia  analysis  annual  ansible  anthropology  apparel  applications  apps  archaeology  art  automobile  backpacks  bankruptcies  bible  biodiversity  books  bopis  bricks-and-mortar  budgets  cards  carrying  cataloging  catalogs  ceos  checklists  chloride  christmas  classification  clothing  co2  cold_storage  collaborations  commodities  commodities_supercycle  commodity  community  consumer_confidence  contacts  contents  contingency_planning  coptic  corn  crude_price  custom  customer_experience  data  databases  dealerships  decline  demotic  department  design  diammonium  digital-to-physical  directory  distribution_centres  drawing  drawings  ducati  dynamic  dynamics  e-commerce  economic.history  economic  economics  emissions  emmakay  energy  envelopes  equipment  eric_reguly  erintaylor  everyday  examples  experiential_marketing  exports  faunas  fertilizer  floras  francoisrobert  free  fresh_produce  gender  geography  georgelegrady  gift-ideas  gift-tags  glencore  greek  gregoryblackstock  grocery  growth  gtd  guide  handbags  hannahsmithallen  hard_times  high-growth  history  home  howto  iassist2010presentation  illustration  imaginary  imports  indexes  information  inscriptions  insolvency  interface  inventory  italian  jasontravis  joanna.neborsky  katebingamanburt  krugman  labels  latin  layout  lego  leisure  lessons_learned  lindaalstead  list  listmaking  lists  mac  macy’s  market_intelligence  marketing  md  menu-planning  merchandising  meredithbrickell  mick_davis  mining  mixing  mobile_applications  mobile_phones  motorcycles  multiple  nordstrom  note-taking  notebookism  notes  objects  of  oil  operational_research  ostraca  osx  overextended  papress  papyri  perishables  phosphate  planner-pages  planning  plans  playbooks  pockets  potash  potassium  price_forecasts  prices  printables  probate  proquest  quality  rafaellozano-hemmer  refrigeration  research  retailers  revenue_management  risk-management  roles  schedules  science  scuttlebutt  second_hand  sellout_culture  service  set  several  sheilagh.ogilvie  shelf_life  small_business  social  sorting  soybe  soybeans  speed  staffing  states  static  statistics  stockpiles  structure  styleguide  summary  supermarkets  tables  tablets  taxonomy  thomas.browne  tips  tools  tracking  tricks  tropics  tutorial  ui  united  va  variables  volatility  wal-mart  warning_signs  wearable  wearables  web_2.0  webdesign  websites  whauden  wheat  xstrata  yield_management 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: