interdisciplinarity   327

« earlier    

Institute for New Economic Thinking
"First they want to impress you with how technically competent they are. Then they tell you the story about what they're doing. But what they should be doing is to tell you the story about what they're doing then tell you why they need these techniques to do it."

Network analysis...very interesting...but not incorporated into traditional macroeconomics.
economics  sociology  ob  interdisciplinarity 
5 weeks ago by bradleyrturner
AI’s social sciences deficit | Nature Machine Intelligence
To create less harmful technologies and ignite positive social change, AI engineers need to enlist ideas and expertise from a broad range of social science disciplines, including those embracing qualitative methods, say Mona Sloane and Emanuel Moss.
ai  methodology  social_science  interdisciplinarity  computer_science  automation  qualitative_research 
august 2019 by JFIResearch
Rough Guide to Interdisciplinarity: Graduate Student Perspectives | BioScience | Oxford Academic
Core recommendation 1: Attend to the process This recommendation is simple, yet profoundly difficult to maintain in academia. Attending to the process describes the mental effort necessary to rigorously explore interdisciplinary topics while also addressing the interpersonal dynamics intrinsic in groups. Breakdown of collaboration is a recurrent theme in the literature on interdisciplinarity (Rhoten and Parker 2004). For the authors of this article, instances of constrained collaboration occurred as a result of miscommunication, lack of accountability of team members, or divergent expectations among faculty and students.

To attend to the process, the urban ecology IGERT at the University of Washington hires a professional group dynamics facilitator. This person conducts workshops—attended simultaneously by faculty, students, and staff—on group management skills, interpersonal communication strategies, and creative problem solving....

Core recommendation 2: Develop students' sense of ownership When students experience ownership of and agency within an IDRT program, a practice of collective responsibility emerges in all program elements (e.g., team projects, seminars, co-instruction). For example, when we facilitate learning in the IDRT group, we each develop unique scholarly identities and areas of expertise. Student ownership and agency are promoted as we design and facilitate a quarterly graduate seminar ab initio (faculty are not session leaders), and as each PhD student cohort designs and teaches an undergraduate urban ecology course. Redesigning the seminar quarterly, and the course annually, generates student involvement and camaraderie. While faculty participate in discussions and serve as expert consultants in these program components, students develop and facilitate course themes, structure, and sessions. ...

Core recommendation 3: Garner institutional support Institutional support is intellectual and financial, and both components are critical for faculty and students. Intellectual support includes the ability to access faculty in multiple departments and to develop PhD committees comprising multiple disciplines. ... Doctoral committee members who privilege one epistemological approach over another (e.g., quantitative over qualitative), for example, can cripple PhD student progress and potentially affect retention rates in IDRT programs. ...

Graduate students must plan ahead to successfully complete an interdisciplinary doctorate. This planning must be addressed from the outset, individually and within the research group, to integrate departmental (e.g., timely courses, exams, fieldwork) and team research requirements. Students need to undertake several important steps: (a) clarify the accountability of all team research participants (students, team members, and faculty), (b) align requirements for progress in the home department and the IDRT program, (c) recognize and accommodate the amount of time needed to conduct team research and complete all other requirements...

Understanding and appreciating different worldviews requires a commitment to curiosity about different disciplines' contributions to an interdisciplinary endeavor. Traditional competition among disciplines for recognition, for students, and ultimately for funding limits the productivity and cohesion of IDRT teams, resulting in students' losing perspective about their own goals and expectations. ...

We recommend an appreciative stance toward all disciplines in an IDRT program, accompanied by the suspension of disciplinary biases regarding “legitimate” research. We recommend that participants regularly and explicitly check their perspectives for evidence of disciplinary bias. To practice appreciative inquiry in the Urban Ecology IGERT Program, we developed, posted, and followed “teamwork rules,” such as “Articulate your commitment to operating from a place of curiosity,” “Respect ‘sacred datesÂ’ on group work calendars,”“Respect others' viewpoints.”
interdisciplinarity  PhD  pedagogy  mentoring 
july 2019 by shannon_mattern
The Professor Is In: The Curse of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. | ChronicleVitae
Institutional rhetoric on interdisciplinarity just isn’t matched by administrative or organizational support of interdisciplinarity—especially not when it comes to tenure lines, which are still overwhelmingly approved in the traditional disciplinary homes. Sure, there are other East Asian language and culture departments, but they’re small in number compared to departments of history or anthropology. Graduate students are inevitably thrilled about entering interdisciplinary programs because at the start they see (and are informed of) only the intellectual and programmatic opportunities. What they don’t understand (and are not informed of) are the limitations the interdisciplinary Ph.D. imposes on them when they go out on the market.

What to do?

Take a long hard look at your record, and get clear on which traditional disciplinary field you will be most competitive in. Then, while you’re still in grad school, build a conference, grant, and publication record that places you firmly in that field. Don’t go to conferences and publish in three or four different disciplines. Pick one or at most two, and focus your efforts on those.

Also strategize your letter-writers so they reflect the discipline at which you are aiming. That famous linguist who was so helpful to you on your committee? She’ll be of limited utility in your history job search. Molding your record of grants, conferences, publications, and letter writers to a particular disciplinary home. When you finish, search committees will look at you and see a card-carrying member of their discipline.
job_search  mentoring  interdisciplinarity 
july 2019 by shannon_mattern
Cutting Across Disciplinary Boundaries | Higher Ed Gamma
Many of the most influential scholars and teachers that I have encountered over the past forty years have been anything but narrow disciplinary specialists. Their scholarship could not be easily pigeon-holed. My mentor, David Brion Davis, exemplified the kind of professor who was as comfortable with literature and theology as history, who viewed scholarship as moral enterprise, and whose writing is known for its literary and philosophical tenor.

Might it not make sense for Ph.D. programs to strive to nurture such scholars by training them across humanities disciplines?...

Among the objections to a more self-consciously interdisciplinary training is that such an education tends to be superficial and to neglect cutting-edge approaches and fields of study. But, in my view, the advantages outweigh any disadvantages. At a time when a growing proportion of undergraduates will receive only limited exposure to the humanities, it is vital for them to receive a broad, well-rounded introduction to the richness of all of those disciplines.
academia  interdisciplinarity 
july 2019 by shannon_mattern
Dominic Pettman — The Species Without Qualities: Critical Media Theory and the Posthumanities | boundary 2
At what point can we confidently say that an emerging field, or nexus of fields, has “arrived” into the academy? When there are conferences dedicated to it? When there are book series bearing the name, backed by university presses? When there are job descriptions that mention it? When there are actual degrees offered in it, as opposed to occasional classes, splashed across departments? Or when some other criteria or metric invented by institutional historians or pragmatic administrators has been satisfied?... Taken as a whole, “the humanities” have been under siege for several decades now, and something else seems to be emerging from the glowing ashes, something we might loosely label the “posthumanities.”...

the posthumanities represent an unprecedented re-orientation of knowledge – and constellation of new practices – that promise to make an enormous contribution to the ongoing enterprise of self-understanding writ large. (Whereby self-understanding is the essential foundation for navigating alterity, in all its most telling or pressing forms.) More specifically, the posthumanities pay special attention to our relationship to relationships; including and especially the relationship to our tools (which themselves are conscientiously helping to reveal new relationships, as well as often rendering older relationships – say, with viruses or carbon – in a new light)...

The question of media (for instance, “how do different technologies determine or influence human habits in certain ways?”) evolves and expands to become more the question of mediation itself (such as, “how are human habits enframed by apparatuses of all kinds, both material and not?”). What we know, and how we know it, is now framed within a productively destabilizing ontology. We can no longer presume who the “we” is that manifests the privileged place of knowing....

The humanities might thus be considered a discursive engine for producing interpretation, critique, and the ongoing evaluation of values.[ii] Reading the past – which does not mean only reading texts in the Archive, but also objects and artificial fossils of all kinds – is a necessary condition for orienting ourselves in time and space: a capacity that some critics (notably Bernard Stiegler) believe that we are swiftly losing; becoming existentially disoriented, and unable to sustain or contribute to the trans-generational human project. The humanities have built their reputation and authority on their ability to act as not just a moral compass for our kind, but an aesthetic astrolabe and ethical protractor....

The rise of the “studies” model – as with Cultural Studies, Gender Studies, Food Studies, etc. – exhibits a growing interest in clustering work around an object of study, rather than a specific approach or methodology. This can lead to very exciting, paradigm-shifting work. But it can also result in a Babel of different agendas and registers, which often only coalesce in the eyes of administrators or in wishful phantom student demographics, rather than according to any specific internal logic or organizing principle. This collective – and only partially coherent – endeavor, it is true, threatens to fall apart. (Especially as the other, more established and traditional disciplines wake up to the importance of media to their own legacy and mission, and begin to annex parts of the former domain of Media Studies, sometimes reinventing the wheel in the process.) ...

What is the difference between media studies and the philosophy of technology? Or an anthropology of communication? Or a material history infrastructures? All of these approaches have something significant to contribute to the study of media. But then what makes media studies distinctive? The difference, I would venture, is that media studies begins with the object, or the vector. It begins with the in-between; the interface; the threshold.... history looks very different when we view it from the point of view of the technologies that enabled it. (I’m thinking of Manuel de Landa’s “robot historian,” who narrates the evolution of war from the perspective of different types of weapon, rather than the people they killed.)[vi] As this example suggests, there is a danger of evacuating, or at marginalizing, humans, when we focus on media. I would argue, however, that this kind of decentering is crucial if we are to in fact relocate the human in a more measured, ethical – and, dare I say, even cosmically accurate – way....

Critical Media Theory complicates McLuhan’s definition of media as “the extensions of man,” just as McLuhan himself, at times, recognized man may be extensions of media. (As when he impishly suggested that human beings could be considered “the sex organs of the machine world.”)[vii] Media is thus posited as ubiquitous, atmospheric, perhaps even elemental. From this perspective, the media is not just newspapers and televisions and cell-phones, but perhaps even the environment itself (as John Durham Peters, Jussi Parikka, and Shannon Mattern have argued).[viii] This approach renders the nature/culture divide moot, as we begin to see the use of organic media in the natural world (for instance, cetaceans using sonic communication, or cuttlefish signaling to each other through the phasing of colors, and so on). Critical media theory thus dovetails in some interesting ways with the new interest in “environmental humanities,” as the natural sciences open up new doors, and indeed vast new territories, for the study of media....

Critical Media Theory explicitly acknowledges the difficulty that media studies has had recognizing its proper object from within itself (and thus actively seeks perspectives from other intellectual umwelten, such as systems theory, biology, art history, process philosophy, science and technology studies, etc.). It is also less concerned with issues of representation (or ideology), than the scaffolding which allows ideological effects to circulate at scales and speeds previously unconsidered. (Think of flash-trading, CRISPR gene technologies, 3D printing, or high speed algorithms.) At one time, literary theory, for instance, felt it had a strong handle on “media” as a fledgling discipline, because of its own profound grasp of the mechanics of narrative. But this is no use when it comes to the examples I just mentioned. And even in the mid-twentieth century, in the case of cinema, attention to narrative does not account for the subtle but real differences between, say, Technicolor and Color-by-Deluxe....

For me, cultural studies and media studies are a mobius strip, tracing the often seamless distinctions between form and content, infrastructure and ideology. The wager of Critical Media Theory is that by asking more fundamental, theoretical questions – as well as forging unexpected new ones – it is possible to more directly and usefully engage with the unstable and unpredictable landscape of media....

Both Wolfe and Braidotti have been criticized, however, for simply using humanities methods – and established academic protocols and privileges – to examine the posthuman, rather than following their own rhetoric to its logical conclusion (i.e., radical new methods and approaches). For the posthumanities to be more than simply a description of a new field of study – rather than a comprehensive reboot of the humanities themselves – we need to be creative and rather brave, especially when it comes to questioning our own habits of both mind and deed. As an unnamed spokesperson for The Center for Disruptive Media notes: “[I]f knowledge and research are the result of complex processes involving both human and non-human objects and actants, what does this mean for politics and ethics? In short, how can we perform knowledge-making practices differently...

there is an emerging wave of writing from academics who feel enervated by the same intellectual – well – gestures; and who seek to import new voices, strategies, conceits, and genres into our discursive worlds.[xxxvi] This project is one such example of this new wave, originally inspired by Vilem Flusser’s own willingness to go beyond the conventions of the analytical essay towards more speculative and mischievous projects (of which his Vampyroteuthis Infernalis – a philosophical treatise on the ontology of the giant squid – is his most famous example)
academic  disciplinarity  interdisciplinarity  methodology  epistemology  curriculum 
april 2019 by shannon_mattern
The Interdisciplinary Delusion - The Chronicle of Higher Education
The humanities, like other fields of study, tell us important truths about some parts of the world. Disciplinary diversity is grounded in a pluralistic vision of things. But such pluralism necessarily produces tensions among different methods and truth claims. The best interdisciplinary humanities work confronts these tensions head on. ...

On a highly idealized picture, disciplines that minimize variables find it easier to agree on truth claims and thus, in their view, to build knowledge over time than disciplines that scale upward in the effort to be persuasive. The sheer variety of factors that can go into or be left out of an influential reading means that the literary disciplines are prone to what might seem from the outside to be a circular eclecticism and heterogeneity, periodically redefining their interpretations or even their core concepts with little convergence or accumulation. Such eclecticism should not detract from the discipline’s claims to say something true about the world. Rather, it should reveal something important about criticism as a method, its movement from individual artifacts to explanations that hold across forms, genres, and contexts....

If we are to be interdisciplinary, we require a model of interdisciplinarity that respects the character of disciplines at a moment when their independence is under attack. The defense of disciplines is neither conservative nor elegiac. It is a defense of a vision of the world as itself plural.
academia  interdisciplinarity  methodology  epistemology  via:shannon_mattern 
january 2019 by crystaljjlee
The Interdisciplinary Delusion - The Chronicle of Higher Education
The humanities, like other fields of study, tell us important truths about some parts of the world. Disciplinary diversity is grounded in a pluralistic vision of things. But such pluralism necessarily produces tensions among different methods and truth claims. The best interdisciplinary humanities work confronts these tensions head on. ...

On a highly idealized picture, disciplines that minimize variables find it easier to agree on truth claims and thus, in their view, to build knowledge over time than disciplines that scale upward in the effort to be persuasive. The sheer variety of factors that can go into or be left out of an influential reading means that the literary disciplines are prone to what might seem from the outside to be a circular eclecticism and heterogeneity, periodically redefining their interpretations or even their core concepts with little convergence or accumulation. Such eclecticism should not detract from the discipline’s claims to say something true about the world. Rather, it should reveal something important about criticism as a method, its movement from individual artifacts to explanations that hold across forms, genres, and contexts....

If we are to be interdisciplinary, we require a model of interdisciplinarity that respects the character of disciplines at a moment when their independence is under attack. The defense of disciplines is neither conservative nor elegiac. It is a defense of a vision of the world as itself plural.
academia  interdisciplinarity  disciplinarity  methodology  epistemology 
october 2018 by shannon_mattern
[The Family] Avoiding Zombie Startups
zombie startups: companies that have the outside appearance of a startup but that aren’t moving that quickly and that are likely to always stay small, kept alive with suboptimal sources of funding (bad angel investors, subsidies, grants, etc.):
#1 Don't join a startup only because of the cash it has raised.
#2 Don't join a startup because of the prizes it has won or the coverage it got.
#3 Don't join a startup in which the team isn’t properly incentivised equity-wise.
#4 Always ask yourself why they are hiring.
#5 Companies can have different values but transparency is non-negotiable.
@Article  @HOWTO  Finance  Entrepreneurship  Motivation  HR  Investment  PEnVC  Trustworthiness  Funding  Marketing  InterpersonalCommunication  CorporateGovernance  Interdisciplinarity 
october 2018 by jslu
B.S. in Artificial Intelligence - Curriculum | Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science
BSAI majors will take courses in math and statistics, computer science, AI, science and engineering, and humanities and arts. There's also room built into the curriculum for academic exploration via electives. Here's how the curriculum breaks down.
@CourseOutline  @Reference  AI  MachineLearning  Math  Interdisciplinarity  Engineering 
september 2018 by jslu
The ‘Two Cultures’ Fallacy - The Chronicle of Higher Education
How the "two cultures" division is maintained, artificially, by academics on both sides who have a stake in the distinction (or believe they do). The distinction does a disservice to everybody, in particular because research and knowledge creation in the future will increasingly be transdisciplinary.
academia  two_cultures  humanities  science  interdisciplinarity 
july 2018 by johnmfrench

« earlier    

related tags

2013  2015  2016  @article  @company  @comparison  @concept  @courseoutline  @example  @gov  @graph  @howto  @interview  @reference  @research  @site  a-way-of-being-thought-shallow-in-two-fields-at-once  academia  academic-culture  academic  academicpublishing  acwri  adaptability  adaptations  advising  agility  ai  algorithms  alicesebrell  andreazittel  angelgallardo  animation  annialbers  anthologies  anthrodesign  anthrogeek  anthropology  antipode  api  archaeology  architecture  archives  art  artinstituteofchicago  artseducation  assessment  attentionmanagement  attitude  automation  autonomy  balance  banking  bardcollege  bargainingandnegotiation  bauhaus  bhqfu  big-science  bigdata  bingchenliu  biology  blackmountaincollege  bmc  books  bubbles  buckminsterfuller  business  buzzwords  career  carolkino  carsondavis  cca  celebrity  cloudcomputing  collaboration  colonialism  communes  communication  communities  community  computation  computer_science  corporategovernance  costdown  course.use  creativity  crowdsourcing  cultural.geography  culture  curation  curriculum  cycleandrhythmoflife  cytwombly  data  data_science  datasearch  datavis  dataviz  decision-making  decolonization  democracy  deschooling  design-thinking  design  devops  digital_ethics  disciplinarity  disciplines  discrimination  diversity  downloaded  e-commerce  economics  education  edwardsaid  empathy  engineering  entrepreneurship  epistemology  ethics_of_algorithms  ethnic_id  ethnography  experientiallearning  experimental.geography  favorites  feedback-receiving  finance  financial_access  financial_crisis  financial_economics  finland  form  foucaultmichel  framework  frantzfanon  franzkline  freedom  funding  geog107  geog495  geographers  geography  geohumanities  globalization  goal-setting  great_recession  greggbordowitz  happiness  helenmolesworth  higher_education  highered  highereducation  history  holismandoneness  horizon2020  housing  howeteach  howwelearn  hr  humanities  ilyabolotowsky  impact  indicatorindexandratio  industry  inequality  innovation  inquiry  institutes  integration  interdisciplinary-collaboration  interdisciplinary  internet  interpersonalcommunication  interviews  investment  iu  jacoblawrence  jay  jenniferraab  jeromerobbins  job_search  john-allspaw  johnandrewrice  johncage  jonathanwilliams  josefalbers  katherinemckittrick  landscape  language  latentdesire  law  lawrenceuniversity  leadership  leapbeforeyoulook  learning  lesleyuniversity  liberalarts  libraries  lowresidencymfas  machine_learning  machinelearning  maps  margarita  marketing  materials  math  media  meghanwadle  mentoring  mercecunningham  metaphor  metaresearch  methodology  michaelaiuvalasit  mobile  modernism  monopsony  motivation  mountainschoolofarts  naturejournal  noahdavis  non-verbal  ob  oberlincollege  outsourcing  paper  pedagogy  penvc  peopleskill  personalaccountability  personalgrowth  phd  philosophy  physics  place  postmodernism  power-asymmetric  problem-solving  process  productivity  programming  progressive  progressiveeducation  projectmanagement  prototyping  qualitative_research  quantification  quitlit  race  racism  reading  rebuildfoundation  recsys  redlining  ref  reference  research  robertmotherwell  robertrauschenberg  rollinscollege  ruthasawa  salesmanship  saravanderbeek  scalability  scenario  school  schools  science  scientific-method  securitization  self-confidence  self-designedmajors  seo  serviceindustry  shadow_banking  social.science  social_science  social_sciences  socialsciences  sociology  software  space  stanvanderbeek  stock  stolaf  storytelling  studio  suny-fredonia  system-of-professions  systemarchitecture  tax  tcnj  tdd  teaching  teamwork  tech  technology  theastergates  theodoredreier  theory  timemanagement  timmcgee  tip  toget  trustworthiness  tutorial  twitterfav  two_cultures  ui  um  umd  uminn  undergroundmuseum  unexpectednessuncertaintyandimpermanence  universities  unschooling  us_economy  usa  uw  ux  vancouver  vermontcollege  visualization  walking  warburg  webanalytics  webdesign  webhosting  world  worldliness  writing 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: