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Brabham's wild BT62 Supercar Broke The Lap Record At Mount Panorama
The Mount Panorama circuit in Bathurst, New South Wales is incredibly tight and complex as it winds its way to the top of the mountain, with long straights and sweeping curves down the other side. It takes a serious level of concentration, skill, and luck to put in a blistering lap time there, as well as a really good car.
The prior lap record, a 1 minute 59.291 second lap, was set by Christopher Mies in a de-restricted Audi R8 LMS Ultra in November of last year. That time is already more than two seconds clear of the GT3-class pole winner for today’s 12 hour race. In fact, it is faster than Formula 3 and Formula 5000 cars that race at Mount Panorama as well.
cars  hypercard  record  racing  crowdfunding 
17 days ago by rgl7194
The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED
"THE FUTURE BOOK was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.

Prognostications about how technology would affect the form of paper books have been with us for centuries. Each new medium was poised to deform or murder the book: newspapers, photography, radio, movies, television, videogames, the internet.

Some viewed the intersection of books and technology more positively: In 1945, Vannevar Bush wrote in The Atlantic: “Wholly new forms of encyclopedias will appear, ready made with a mesh of associative trails running through them, ready to be dropped into the memex and there amplified.”

Researcher Alan Kay created a cardboard prototype of a tablet-like device in 1968. He called it the "Dynabook," saying, “We created a new kind of medium for boosting human thought, for amplifying human intellectual endeavor. We thought it could be as significant as Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press 500 years ago.”

In the 1990s, Future Bookism hit a kind of beautiful fever pitch. We were so close. Brown University professor Robert Coover, in a 1992 New York Times op-ed titled “The End of Books,” wrote of the future of writing: “Fluidity, contingency, indeterminacy, plurality, discontinuity are the hypertext buzzwords of the day, and they seem to be fast becoming principles, in the same way that relativity not so long ago displaced the falling apple.” And then, more broadly: “The print medium is a doomed and outdated technology, a mere curiosity of bygone days destined soon to be consigned forever to those dusty unattended museums we now call libraries.”

Normal books? Bo-ring. Future Books? Awesome—indeterminate—and we were almost there! The Voyager Company built its "expanded books" platform on Hypercard, launching with three titles at MacWorld 1992. Microsoft launched Encarta on CD-ROM.

But … by the mid-2000s, there still were no real digital books. The Rocket eBook was too little, too early. Sony launched the eink-based Librie platform in 2004 to little uptake. Interactive CD-ROMs had dropped off the map. We had Wikipedia, blogs, and the internet, but the mythological Future Book—some electric slab that would somehow both be like and not like the quartos of yore—had yet to materialize. Peter Meirs, head of technology at Time, hedged his bets perfectly, proclaiming: “Ultimately, there will be some sort of device!”

And then there was. Several devices, actually. The iPhone launched in June 2007, the Kindle that November. Then, in 2010, the iPad arrived. High-resolution screens were suddenly in everyone’s hands and bags. And for a brief moment during the early 2010s, it seemed like it might finally be here: the glorious Future Book."



"Yet here’s the surprise: We were looking for the Future Book in the wrong place. It’s not the form, necessarily, that needed to evolve—I think we can agree that, in an age of infinite distraction, one of the strongest assets of a “book” as a book is its singular, sustained, distraction-free, blissfully immutable voice. Instead, technology changed everything that enables a book, fomenting a quiet revolution. Funding, printing, fulfillment, community-building—everything leading up to and supporting a book has shifted meaningfully, even if the containers haven’t. Perhaps the form and interactivity of what we consider a “standard book” will change in the future, as screens become as cheap and durable as paper. But the books made today, held in our hands, digital or print, are Future Books, unfuturistic and inert may they seem."

[sections on self-publishing, crowdfunding, email newsletters, social media, audiobooks and podcasts, etc.]



"It turns out smartphones aren’t the best digital book reading devices (too many seductions, real-time travesties, notifications just behind the words), but they make excellent audiobook players, stowed away in pockets while commuting. Top-tier podcasts like Serial, S-Town, and Homecoming have normalized listening to audio or (nonfiction) booklike productions on smartphones."



"Last August, a box arrived on my doorstep that seemed to embody the apotheosis of contemporary publishing. The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition was published via a crowdfunding campaign. The edition includes a book of images, three records, and a small poster packaged in an exquisite box set with supplementary online material. When I held it, I didn’t think about how futuristic it felt, nor did I lament the lack of digital paper or interactivity. I thought: What a strange miracle to be able to publish an object like this today. Something independently produced, complex and beautiful, with foil stamping and thick pages, full-color, in multiple volumes, made into a box set, with an accompanying record and other shimmering artifacts, for a weirdly niche audience, funded by geeks like me who are turned on by the romance of space.

We have arrived to the once imagined Future Book in piecemeal truths.

Moving images were often espoused to be a core part of our Future Book. While rarely found inside of an iBooks or Kindle book, they are here. If you want to learn the ukulele, you don’t search Amazon for a Kindle how-to book, you go to YouTube and binge on hours of lessons, stopping when you need to, rewinding as necessary, learning at your own pace.

Vannevar Bush's “Memex” essentially described Wikipedia built into a desk.

The "Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy" in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is an iPhone.

In The Book of Sand, Borges wrote of an infinite book: "It was then that the stranger told me: 'Study the page well. You will never see it again.'" Describing in many ways what it feels like to browse the internet or peek at Twitter.

Our Future Book is composed of email, tweets, YouTube videos, mailing lists, crowdfunding campaigns, PDF to .mobi converters, Amazon warehouses, and a surge of hyper-affordable offset printers in places like Hong Kong.

For a “book” is just the endpoint of a latticework of complex infrastructure, made increasingly accessible. Even if the endpoint stays stubbornly the same—either as an unchanging Kindle edition or simple paperback—the universe that produces, breathes life into, and supports books is changing in positive, inclusive ways, year by year. The Future Book is here and continues to evolve. You’re holding it. It’s exciting. It’s boring. It’s more important than it has ever been.

But temper some of those flight-of-fancy expectations. In many ways, it’s still a potato."
craigmod  ebooks  reading  howweread  2018  kindle  eink  print  publishing  selfpublishing  blurb  lulu  amazon  ibooks  apple  digital  bookfuturism  hypertext  hypercard  history  vannevarbush  borges  twitter  animation  video  newsletters  email  pdf  mobi  epub  infrastructure  systems  economics  goldenrecord  voyager  audio  audiobooks  smarthphones  connectivity  ereaders  podcasts  socialmedia  kevinkelly  benthompson  robinsloan  mailchimp  timbuktulabs  elenafavilli  francescacavallo  jackcheng  funding  kickstarter  crowdfunding  blogs  blogging  wikipedia  internet  web  online  writing  howwewrite  self-publishing  youtube 
6 weeks ago by robertogreco
The Freedom to Associate | The Digital Antiquarian
@modernserf: like, here's a great view into HyperCard's development inside Apple, which I had never seen discussed before
hypercard  history  apple  comment  alankay  archive_it 
october 2018 by mechazoidal
Uncle Buddy's Phantom Funhouse | The Obscuritory
"Phantom Funhouse is for the people who want a narrative to push back and refuse to give up its secrets. It’s a character study for the folks who datamine games to learn more about them, and in fact, there’s more hidden in Phantom Funhouse if you attempt to hack it open using the Mac resource-viewing tool ResEdit.

It starts out as an interesting exercise about a sci-fi punk told through his documents and references. It seems like a lot of detail for a fictional world, though, and the longer you stare at it, the more that seems to be point. Can you create another universe through writing? Are the characters we create alive in their own way, and what if they reject us? If someone else read the objects from our lives like they were pages in a story, what would they think about us? Would we just look like a self-indulgent collection of in-jokes and favorite movies?"
gamedev  writing  retrogaming  hypercard  multimedia 
september 2018 by mechazoidal
Twitter
Emulation is indeed a powerful tool! Here is an application, programmed in witch uses XCMD and XFCN reso…
HyperCard  from twitter_favs
september 2018 by verwinv
Twitter
Reasons HyperCard 2.0 took so long to ship:

1. We couldn't ship until we had tested it with the new Macintosh LX, the one with the impressive performance, quite ride, and distinctive styling, all for under $25,000. See your dealer today.

(h/t TidBITS and Kevin Calhoun)

— HyperCard (@HyperCard) August 27, 2018
FavoriteTweet  HyperCard 
august 2018 by mjtsai
Twitter
Reasons HyperCard 2.0 took so long to ship:

3. Nobody told us you were supposed yo finish the thing first.

2. Howard Spira had his money on System 7.0

— HyperCard (@HyperCard) August 27, 2018
FavoriteTweet  HyperCard 
august 2018 by mjtsai
Twitter
Reasons HyperCard 2.0 took so long to ship:

5. For most of us, it was a great way to avoid sweltering in Boston in August.

4. It took months to devise all those phony seed releases with all those phony bugs, which were doing only as a clever ruse, of course.

— HyperCard (@HyperCard) August 27, 2018
FavoriteTweet  HyperCard 
august 2018 by mjtsai
Twitter
Reasons HyperCard 2.0 took so long to ship:

7. We introduced it at WWDC and thought there was a rule anything you introduce there can't ship until after next year's WWDC.

6. Bowling shirts just take longer than T-Shirts

— HyperCard (@HyperCard) August 27, 2018
FavoriteTweet  HyperCard 
august 2018 by mjtsai
Twitter
Reasons HyperCard 2.0 took so long to ship:

10. Bill left without telling us how it worked.

9. We were saving it as a going-away present for Jean-Louis

8. It took months to get the color out after we discovered the manuals didn't mention it.

— HyperCard (@HyperCard) August 27, 2018
FavoriteTweet  HyperCard 
august 2018 by mjtsai
Old Problems, New Instrumentalities - Quora Design - Quora
We are hardly the first to hope to use computer technologies to optimize what one might call “knowledge dynamics,” of course. In an interview discussing how he came to the ideas behind his extraordinary HyperCard (1987), Bill Atkinson describes his own vision of the possibilities during an acid trip:

>And I'd look up there at the stars, and I'd kind of look down, and you know, there were street lamps. There was a parallel between the stars and the street lamps. The stars are … so far apart. Many of them can't even communicate because of speed of light limitations. … As I looked down at the street lamps, and I saw pools of light… I thought about human knowledge. I thought about how the physicists know some things, and the poets know some things, and the musicians know some things, and the chemists know some, and the biologists know some… But, they don't talk to each other. So, they don't see the bigger picture of how they connect… We have technology to change the future, but not the right wisdom to make the ethical and aesthetic choices between alternative futures. We need more wisdom. I thought, "Well, hell. I'm a kid. I don't know what I'm talking [about], I'm not wise. I'm not old enough to have wisdom." But…I thought about the relationship between information and knowledge. You have to have information before you can have knowledge, and knowledge is kind of the how connections. How does this connect to that? … [W]isdom is kind of the why connections… [I]f you have modules of knowledge, and now you want to make ethical and aesthetic choices about different futures, that's really a why question. And, I thought, if you can at least facilitate this, the connection of the different bodies of knowledge, talking to each other, then there's kind of a, you know, a trickle off effect that you might develop some wisdom on the planet. So, that's where HyperCard really came from.
hypercard  memex  quora  mills-baker  bill-atkinson 
august 2018 by jbrennan

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