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Twitter
RT : Fact check:

Before the invention of twitter, scientists didn't work 24 hours a day either.
Histsci  from twitter
10 weeks ago by jrosenau
Science's debt to the slave trade | Science
“Modern science and the transatlantic slave trade were two of the most important factors in the shaping of the modern world.” Historians are finally recognizing that they shaped each other as well. As Delbourgo says, “We've been so negligent in bringing these histories [of slavery and science] together. We've missed that they are in fact the same history.”
histsci  slavery 
april 2019 by madamim
Twitter
RT : Calling all enthusiasts, at Science in the Making you can transcribe, tag and comment on documents from ou…
histsci  from twitter
january 2019 by miaridge
The imperial roots of climate science
Universities, institutes, museums, herbaria, observational networks, publishing houses and government bureaus settled on climatology, meteorology and the metaphor of atmospheric circulation as the scientific proof of the ‘naturalness’ of the empire. This group developed a science designed to show the dynamic interdependence of regions with wildly diverse topography, hydrography and vegetation. Just as the wind from Austria brought rain to the Hungarian plain, and alpine snows fed the lands of the Danube, so each region was shown to provide some climatic essential that an adjoining one lacked.


Review of Climate in Motion: Science, Empire, and the Problem of Scale, by Deborah R.Coen
climate  histsci  europe 
july 2018 by madamim
Twitter
Newton's and - considered some of the greatest works in the field of . Our campaign to…
Principia  histsci  Opticks  from twitter_favs
april 2018 by rukku
Historiens de la santé: Les cultures matérielles des communautés urbains de savoir
(Call for papers) Workshop on the material cultures of urban knowledge communities, 1500-1800
histsci  from twitter_favs
february 2018 by freerange_inc
Twitter
RT : Looking for postgraduate opportunities in ? We have an -funded (fees plus maintenance) Master's+PhD on…
histsci  from twitter
january 2018 by cathmnet
The Life and Science of Tor Bergeron: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society: Vol 59, No 4
What I had read in Wegener's book evidently lay latent in my mind, when in February 1922, just before emigrating to Norway for a 13 years' stay there, I spent a couple of weeks for recreation at a health resort at an altitude of 430 m (1400 ft) on a hill near Oslo. On that hill we were often in a supercooled stratus layer, and when walking on a narrow road in the fir forest, parallel to the contours of the hillside, I noticed that the "fog" did not enter the "road tunnel" at, say, -5° to -10°C, but did enter it when the temperature was >0°C ... My tentative explanation came immediately. At -10°C the rime-clad branches of the firs along the windward side of the road by diffusion transport "filtered away" so much of the water vapor in the air (because at -10°C the saturation vapor pressure over ice is less than that over water) that the fog droplets partly evaporated.

[...]

I hope to be excused for having underestimated the role and importance of rain release in warm clouds, since I then hardly had seen any weather or climate south of 50°N (except the winter of 1928/29 on Malta.

[...]

Naturally, the ice nucleus theory was judged and received very differently, depending on the disposition and personal experiences of my colleagues, the climate they lived in, etc.
histsci  clouds  meteorology  physics  weather  ice  thermodynamics 
january 2018 by madamim
Twitter
Hang a piece of on your wall! See our vast print collection from the archives
histsci  from twitter_favs
november 2017 by danbri
The chromatic scale - James Sowerby | The Royal Society
Hang a piece of on your wall! See our vast print collection from the archives
histsci  from twitter_favs
november 2017 by danbri
Twitter
RT : Hang a piece of on your wall! See our vast print collection from the archives
histsci  from twitter_favs
october 2017 by dalcrose
Eagle Owl - Edward Lear | The Royal Society
RT : Hang a piece of on your wall! See our vast print collection from the archives
histsci  from twitter_favs
october 2017 by dalcrose
Twitter
RT : Charles Darwin's sketch of the primate family tree, 1868.
histsci  from twitter_favs
september 2017 by bowbrick
Baudot code - Wikipedia
As there was no longer a connection between the operator's hand movement and the bits transmitted, there was no concern about arranging the code to minimize operator fatigue, and instead Murray designed the code to minimize wear on the machinery, assigning the code combinations with the fewest punched holes to the most frequently used characters.[13][14]

For example, the one-hole letters are E and T. The ten two-hole letters are AOINSHRDLZ, very similar to the "Etaoin shrdlu" order used in Linotype machines. Ten more letters have three holes, and the four-hole letters are VXKQ.
telegraphy  encoding  histsci 
may 2017 by madamim

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