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GitHub - Pterodactyl/Panel: Pterodactyl Panel is the free, open-source, game agnostic, self-hosted control panel for users, networks, and game service providers. Pterodactyl supports games and servers such as Minecraft (including Spigot, Bungeecord, and S
Pterodactyl Panel is the free, open-source, game agnostic, self-hosted control panel for users, networks, and game service providers. Pterodactyl supports games and servers such as Minecraft (including Spigot, Bungeecord, and Sponge), ARK: Evolution Evolved, CS:GO, Team Fortress 2, Insurgency, Teamspeak 3, Mumble, and many more. Control all of your games from one unified interface.
games 
yesterday by geetarista
FPS and human perception
Details from cognitive science on 144Hz monitors, 90Hz VR, etc
oculus  games  perception  fps  vision 
yesterday by nelson
Data Atsume
Analysis on how to get the most sardines in Neko Atsume
nekoatsume  games  data 
yesterday by angelchrys
How Checkers Was Solved - The Atlantic
The man who only lost 6 times, EVER and how checkers was "solved" (exhaustive search of starting and end games that met in the middle).
history  math  games  via:HackerNews 
yesterday by mcherm
Torbjörn Svensson Lecturer in Media Arts, Aesthetics and Narration School of Informatics Högskolan i Skövde
Torbjörn Svensson is a PhD student at the School of informatics, University of Skövde, Sweden, and a member of the research group MTEC, Media, Technology and Culture. He is currently doing his PhD studies in a research project called Level Up, focusing on the use of gamification and game technology to increase young citizens (16-39) consumption and re-distribution of news. 
gamification  people  Research  games 
yesterday by paulbradshaw
How Checkers Was Solved - The Atlantic
The computer scientist became fixated on that moment. After the match, he ran simulations to examine what had gone wrong. And he discovered that, in fact, from that move to the end of the game, if both sides played perfectly, he would lose every time. But what he discovered next blew his mind. To see that, a computer or a human would have to look 64 moves ahead.
games  computing  machine-learning  history  people  read-later 
yesterday by kmt

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