esposito   51

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Strategy 1, 3, 5, and 10 - The Scholarly Kitchen
The figures refer to years; they denote the span of one’s strategic outlook. A 1 is concerned with what must be done this year. Everything is urgent. Anything that does not satisfy the requirements of this year is a waste of time. For a 1, a 3-year outlook is suspect, a 5 a bit foolish, a 10 the object of contempt and satire. A 3, of course, sees the 1 as terribly short-sighted. You have to plan ahead, after all, though how far ahead is a matter of debate. The 5 sees the activities of 1 and 3 as things that are pretty much inevitable, as the wheels are already in motion. But the 5 may pull back from the scenarios of the 10. So much can happen between now and then: how can we know?
stratégie  esposito  court-terme  moyen-terme  long-terme  temps  vision 
march 2018 by sentinelle
Twitter
RT : Elena am Montag verpasst? Ihr Vortrag zu Zukunft und Ungewissheit in der digitalen Gesellschaft steht jet…
Esposito  from twitter
march 2018 by ckatzenbach
How Much Does Publishing Cost? - The Scholarly Kitchen
Whenever someone talks about the cost of publishing, the conversation seems to me to take place in a vacuum. Step inside a publishing company and ask this question: Where is the greatest amount of energy expended? The answer is in finding the best authors. Publishing, in other words, is about the relentless pursuit of the best content for a particular program, and the best content comes from the small number of people who can create it. Publishing is brutally competitive, but the competition takes place not so much downstream in sales and marketing but upstream, where editors step into the ring every day, determined to knock out their rivals.
Esposito  publishing  coûts  presses  universitaires 
july 2017 by sentinelle
THAT REVITALIZING FEVER | ENTROPY
What I’m asking for in this essay is really very simple: I want us to stop using the language of difficulty when we talk about literature. I want us to stop doing this because it partakes in the cheapest, lamest stereotypes out there, and because it encourages people to feel like the books we love are frightening things that are too rich for them to experience. And, lastly, because using that language turns us into cheap caricatures of the people we really are.

More than that: every time we do this, we make ourselves tools of the capitalist order. Let’s face it: capitalism as it exists today seeks to infantilize grown men and women. It has a million ways of keeping you in your place—that is, of keeping your mind dull and your eyes fixed on exactly what it wants you to see. One of them is by promulgating this myth that great art is “hard.” Every single time anybody speaks of great art with this language—whether they’re a Ben Marcus or a Jonathan Franzen—they’re making themselves a tool of this oppression.
criticism  reading  literature  esposito 
october 2015 by mjkaul
When Is a Feature a Product, and a Product a Business? | The Scholarly Kitchen
Sometimes the clever way to bring a new feature into the market eludes people for years and then suddenly someone finds the solution. I think we are going to see this with annotation in the next couple years. At this time the annotation of texts is being investigated by many people, but no one has yet figured out the secret sauce that will get anyone to pay for it. Partly this is because annotation is a big topic. Is it simply an online form of footnoting or more like the comments sections we see on blogs such as The Scholarly Kitchen? Can a robust annotation scheme enable meaningful post-publication peer review? How do we design the interface so that we see the annotations we want and are not distracted by those we don’t? And while we spend hours trying to figure out the design and capabilities, how are we going to pay for this? Is annotation an add-on to an existing service (a feature)? A B2B opportunity wherein the annotation capability is marketed to all the platform companies?
feature  product  business  annotation  esposito 
january 2015 by sentinelle
Strategy 1, 3, 5, and 10 | The Scholarly Kitchen
The figures refer to years; they denote the span of one’s strategic outlook. A 1 is concerned with what must be done this year. Everything is urgent. Anything that does not satisfy the requirements of this year is a waste of time. For a 1, a 3-year outlook is suspect, a 5 a bit foolish, a 10 the object of contempt and satire. A 3, of course, sees the 1 as terribly short-sighted. You have to plan ahead, after all, though how far ahead is a matter of debate. The 5 sees the activities of 1 and 3 as things that are pretty much inevitable, as the wheels are already in motion. But the 5 may pull back from the scenarios of the 10. So much can happen between now and then: how can we know?
stratégie  esposito  vision  court-terme  moyen-terme  long-terme 
november 2014 by sentinelle
Theory of the E-book | The Scholarly Kitchen
By this time, we know what an e-book is. It can be differentiated from the device we read it on, a device such as an e-reader, tablet, or smartphone, and in many cases it can be read on multiple devices. The e-book is not the device but the text that is displayed on the device. The text could be Boswell’s “Life of Johnson” or Stephen King’s “11/22/63,” but it’s the same text, the same book however and wherever we read it. In fact, if you pour the text into an analogue container, a paperback book, for example, it’s still the same book. The Signet Classics edition of “Crime and Punishment” from my college days sits atop my (physical) bookshelves, in the very same translation that I read on my iPad. Thus we know what an e-book is. It is pure digital spirit. It alights on one device or another and is conceived to be containerless. The container is the mortal coil, which the e-book shuffles off as circumstances require, to fly away to another device, another provisional container.
ebook  ebooks  Publishing  théorie  esposito 
october 2014 by sentinelle
Everybody Wants a Netflix for Books | The Scholarly Kitchen
So when people say they want a Netflix for books, which of these 3 services are they talking about? It’s my distinct impression that most people confuse Netflix #1 with Netflix #2, and they forget about the lag time for the DVDs. They want a comprehensive and fully up-to-date library for a low monthly price. This will hot happen for movies and video and it will not happen for books.
(...) If the aggregation releases titles too quickly, even if the aggregation is less than comprehensive, it could interfere with other channels, which interferes with the media strategy known as “windowing,” which releases properties along a planned-out timeline the better to maximize
esposito  netflix  books  abonnement  agrégation  windowing 
march 2014 by sentinelle
DBW 2014: Amazon, Subscription and the Book Business
Esposito outlined efforts by Amazon to squeeze ever-tougher terms from cash-strapped nonprofit university presses as well as its efforts to displace distributors like B&T and Ingram with cheaper prices and faster service. He even outlined a “supply chain paradox,” a case study of how Amazon orders titles from third-party distributors, gets them to ship books to libraries overnight packaged in an Amazon box—although paradoxically the same distributor would take longer to ship the title if the sale came to them directly. Esposito said Amazon has about a 10% share of the library market and is taking a growing share of overseas sales of academic titles, disrupting the roles of conventional distributors. “Amazon is thinking 3-5 years ahead and positioning themselves accordingly,” he said.
Amazon  Esposito  BradStone  BookBusiness  PressesUniversitaires  Aerbook  BookShout  Librify  Wattpad 
january 2014 by sentinelle
Amazon: A Cheetah Hunting Gazelles (Publishers) | Digital Book World
Industry consultant Joseph Esposito has also been studying Amazon and its competitors and shared the Digital Book World stage with Brad Stone. (...)”

For those publishers worried that continued poor results at the nation’s largest bricks-and-mortar book retailer might mean its demise, Esposito speculated a way out.

“I fully expect Wal-Mart to buy Barnes & Noble,” he said.

He reasoned that companies like Wal-Mart, H-P and others that Amazon is increasingly competing with will not forever tolerate the e-tailer’s encroaching on to their territory and will fight back. In this case, Wal-Mart would be fighting back by acquiring a major Amazon competitor and propping it up.
dbw14  esposito  amazon  barnes&noble 
january 2014 by sentinelle
Breaking Bad star coming to Comiccon in May – Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa CitizenThe Ottawa Comiccon folks are making a splash early in the new year with the announcement that Giancarlo Esposito will be coming to town in May. Esposito, best known for his role as Gus Fring on the recently concluded Breaking Bad TV series, will be at … …read more Source: Comic Con News From […]
IFTTT  Zennie62  Comic  Con  Breaking  Bad  Giancarlo  Esposito  Gus  Fring  Ottawa  Comiccon  tv 
january 2014 by zennie62
Managing Two Companies at the Same Time | The Scholarly Kitchen
The best communicator in the world, however, cannot persuade everyone. There will always be Company #1 people who will look askance at those in Company #2 and vice versa. It’s too much to ask everyone to have strategic vision and courage; if everyone did, everyone would be a CEO. Nor is it wise to invest too much in changing a company’s culture. Culture grows out of the material circumstances of operations; someone who is a Company #1 sales person, for example, will never be fully comfortable contemplating the sales strategy of Company #2. Being pulled in two directions is part of the job. Get started on Company #2 right now and drive yourself crazy.
strategie  digital  publishing  esposito 
september 2013 by sentinelle
E-Book Ruling Gives Amazon an Advantage - NYTimes.com
Penguin and Random House were innovators who made paperbacks into a disruptive force in the 1940s and ’50s. They were the Amazons of their era, making the traditional book business deeply uneasy. No less an authority than George Orwell thought paperbacks were of so much better value than hardbacks that they spelled the ruination of publishing and bookselling. “The cheaper books become,” he wrote, “the less money is spent on books.” Orwell was wrong, but the same arguments are being made against Amazon and e-books today. Amazon executives are not much for public debate, but they argue that all this disruption will ultimately give more money to more authors and make more books more widely available to more people at cheaper prices, and who could argue with any of that?
Esposito  affaire  verdict  Apple  Amazon  usa  DOJ 
july 2013 by sentinelle
John L. Esposito: New Threat to Egyptian Democracy
Undercover Brother: says that June 30th demos "threaten the democratic process & its future in Egypt"
esposito  jun30  liberalsMB  from twitter_favs
june 2013 by shadihamid
Do Hamsters Pirate Books? « The Scholarly Kitchen
Whether or not piracy hurts book sales is hotly debated in some circles. For publishers, this is a no-brainer, but the evidence for this is not always clear. I have been sifting through the arguments about this for some time now and have concluded that at least in one area, college textbooks, piracy hurts sales. I am not yet persuaded that this is the case for other areas, trade books in particular, and would like to learn more about the circumstances of piracy for those segments.
piratage  education  ebooks  universitaire  esposito 
september 2012 by sentinelle

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